Supplement to Feminist History of Philosophy

Bibliography of Feminist Philosophers Writing about the History of Philosophy

This Bibliography was first constructed by Abigail Gosselin, who maintained it until 2006. In 2015, it was revised and restructured by Rosalind Chaplin and Emily Hodges.

The bibliography begins with a general section of sources that span historical periods. The sections that follow are organized by historical period. Each section begins with a set of general sources for the period. It then lists philosophers from the period in alphabetical order with sources proper to those figures. With respect to secondary sources, this bibliography focuses on material written in English.

This 2015 revision includes substantial additions through the 18th Century. The 19th through 20th Century sections have not been substantially revised since 2006. Some annotations are provided, especially for general sources. These annotations, however, may not include complete information regarding the figures covered in the volume.


General

Books

  • Antony, Louise and Charlotte Witt (eds.), 1993. A Mind of One's Own: Feminist Essays on Reason and Objectivity, Boulder: Westview Press.
  • Alanen, Lilli and Charlotte Witt (eds.), 2004. Feminist Reflections on the History of Philosophy, Dordrecht/Boston: Kluwer Academic Publishers.
  • Atherton, Margaret, 1994. Women Philosophers of the Early Modern Period, Hackett Publishing Co. [Princess Elisabeth of Bohemia, Margaret Cavendish, Anne Viscountess Conway, Damaris Cudworth (Lady Masham), Mary Astell, Catherine Trotter Cockburn, and Lady Mary Shepherd.]
  • Bar On, Bat-Ami (ed.), 1994. Modern Engendering: Critical Feminist Readings in Modern Western Philosophy, Albany: SUNY Press.
  • Broad, Jacqueline and Karen Green, 2009. A history of women's political thought in Europe, 1400–1700, Cambridge University Press. [Explicitly focuses on Pizan, de Beaujeu, de Navarre, Queen Elizabeth of England, de Gournay, Scudery, Cavendish, Astell. Other sections are on groups of women.]
  • Broad, Jacqueline and Karen Green (eds.), 2007. Virtue, Liberty, and Toleration: Political Ideals of European Women (1400–1800), Netherlands: Springer. [Includes chapters specifically dedicated to Margaret Cavendish, Damaris Cudworth Masham, Mary Astell, Elizabeth Carter, Catherine Macauley, and Mary Wollstonecraft.]
  • Case, Bettye Anne and Anne M. Leggett (eds.), 2005. Complexities: Women in Mathematics, Princeton University Press.
  • Coole, Diana H., 1988. Women in Political Theory: From Ancient Misogyny to Contemporary Feminism, Sussex: Wheatsheaf Books.
  • Couchman, Jane and Ann Crabb (eds.), 2005. Women's Letters Across Europe, 1400–1700: Form and Persuasion, Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.
  • Churchill, L.J., P.R. Brown and J. E. Jeffrey (eds.), 2002. Women Writing Latin: From Roman Antiquity to Early Modern Europe, New York: Routledge. [Also listed under Isotta Nagarola]
  • Cornell, Drucilla, 1993. Transformations: Recollective Imagination and Sexual Difference, New York: Routledge.
  • Deutscher, Penelope, 1997. Yielding Gender: Feminism, Deconstruction, and the History of Philosophy, London and New York: Routledge.
  • Duran, Jane, 2006. Eight Women Philosophers: Theory, Politics, and Feminism, Urbana-Champaign: University of Illinois Press. [Includes chapters on Hildegard of Bingen, Anne Conway, Mary Astell, Mary Wollstonecraft, plus some later women.]
  • Dykeman, Therese Boos (ed.), 1999. The Neglected Canon: Nine Women Philosophers from the First to the Twentieth Century, Kluwer Academic Publishers. [Includes discussion of Astell, de la Cruz, de Gourney, van Schurman, and others.]
  • Elshtain, Jean Bethke (ed.), 1982. The Family in Political Thought, Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press.
  • Ferguson, Moira, 1993. Colonialism and Gender Relations from Mary Wollstonecraft to Jamaica Kincaid: East Caribbean Connections, New York: Columbia University Press.
  • Frye, Marilyn, 1992. The Possibility of Feminist Theory, Freedom, CA: The Crossing Press.
  • Fuss, Diana, 1989. Essentially Speaking, New York: Routledge.
  • Gardner, Catherine Villanueva, 2006. Historical Dictionary of Feminist Philosophy, Metuchen: Scarecrow Press.
  • Gatens, Moira, 1991. Feminism and Philosophy: Perspectives on Difference and Equality, Bloomington: Indiana University Press.
  • Gould, Carol C. and Marx W. Wartofsky (eds.), 1976. Women and Philosophy: Toward a Theory of Liberation, New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons.
  • Grimshaw, Jean, 1986. Feminist Philosophers: Women's Perspectives on Philosophical Traditions, Brighton: Wheatsheaf Books.
  • Harding, Sandra and Merrill B. Hintikka (eds.), 1983. Discovering Reality: Feminist Perspectives on Epistemology, Metaphysics, Methodology, and Philosophy of Science, Dordrecht: Reidel.
  • Harding, Sandra, 1986. The Science Question in Feminism, Ithaca: Cornell University Press.
  • Heyes, C. J. (ed.), 2012. Philosophy and Gender (Critical Concepts in Philosophy Series), Routledge. [Has a Section on Ancient and Medieval Philosophy.]
  • Holland, Nancy J., 1998. The Madwoman's Reason: The Concept of the Appropriate in Ethical Thought, University Park: Pennsylvania University Press.
  • Hunter, Lynette and Sarah Hutton (eds.), 1997. Women, science and medicine 1500–1700: mothers and sisters of the Royal Society, Sutton Publishing.
  • Inglis, Laura Lyn and Peter K. Steinfeld, 2000. Old Dead White Men's Philosophy, Amherst: Humanity Books.
  • Jones, Gregory L. and Stephen E. Fowl (eds.), 1995. Rethinking Metaphysics, Cambridge: Blackwell.
  • Kale, S, 2004. French salons: high society and political sociability from the Old Regime to the Revolution of 1848, Johns Hopkins University Press.
  • Keller, Evelyn Fox, 1985. Reflections on Gender and Science, New Haven: Yale University Press.
  • Kersey, Ethel M., 1989. Women Philosophers: A Bio-Critical Sourcebook. Greenwood Press, in Lilly Library, REF/B/105/.W6/K4.7/1989. [Briefly describes 170 women from before 1920.]
  • King, M.L. and A. Rabil Jr., 1983. Her Immaculate Hand: Selected Works by and about the Women Humanists of Quattrocento Italy, Binghamton, N.Y.: Medieval and Renaissance Texts and Studies. [Includes many primary texts of Cassandra Fedele and Laura Cereta among others.]
  • Kittay, Eva Feder and Linda Martín Alcoff (eds.), 2008. The Blackwell guide to feminist philosophy, John Wiley and sons.
  • Korsmeyer, Carolyn, 2004. Gender and Aesthetics: An Introduction, New York: Routledge.
  • Kourany, Janet A., 1998. Philosophy in a Feminist Voice: Critiques and Reconstructions, Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press. Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt7s6sv [Includes Astell, de Gourney, de Grouchy, Guyon, Marie Huber, Amalia Holst, Bathsua Makin, Panckoucke, Sister Jacqueline Pascal, Gabrielle Suchon, Fanny Raoul, and others.]
  • LeDoeuff, Michele, 1991. Hipparchia's Choice: An Essay Concerning Women, Philosophy, Etc, Trista Selous (trans.), Oxford: Blackwell.
  • Lloyd, Genevieve, 1993. The Man of Reason: “Male” and “Female” in Western Philosophy, Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.
  • Lloyd, Genevieve (ed.), 2002. Feminism and History of Philosophy, New York: Oxford University Press.
  • Mahowald, Mary, 1983. The Philosophy of Woman, Indianapolis: Hackett.
  • Matthes, Melissa M., 2000. The Rape of Lucretia and the Founding of Republics: Readings in Livy, Machiavelli, and Rousseau, University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.
  • McAlister, Linda Lopez (ed.) 1996. Hypatia's Daughters: Fifteen Hundred Years of Women Philosophers, Bloomington: Indiana University Press.
  • Menage, Gilles, 1984. The History of Women Philosophers, Beatrice H. Zedler (trans.), Lanham: University Press of America.
  • Moscovici, Claudia, 1996. From Sex Objects to Sexual Subjects, New York: Routledge.
  • Nye, Andrea, 1988. Feminist Theory and the Philosophies of Man, London: Croom Helm.
  • Okin, Susan Moller, 1979. Women in Western Political Thought, Princeton: University of Princeton Press.
  • O’Neill, Eileen and M. Lascano (eds.), 2014. Feminist History of Philosophy: The Recovery and Evaluation of Women's Philosophical Thought, Dordrecht:Springer.
  • Osen, Lynn, 1974. Women in Mathematics, Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press. [Includes chapters on de Agnesi, Marquise du Chatelet, Caroline Herschel, Sophie Germain, Mary Fairfax Somerville, Sonya Corvin-Krukovsky Kovalevsky, and Amy (Amalie) Noether.]
  • Pande, Rekha, 2010. Divine Sounds from the Heart-Singing Unfettered in Their Own Voices: The Bhakti Movement and Its Women Saints (12th to 17th Century), Cambridge Scholars Pub.
  • Panizza, L. and S. Wood., 2000. A History of Women's Writing in Italy, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. [From the early Renaissance to 2000.]
  • Rorty, Richard, J. B. Schneewind, and Quentin Skinner (eds.), 1984. Philosophy in History, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Soper, Kate, 1995. What is Nature? Culture, Politics, and the Non Human, Oxford: Blackwell.
  • Spalding-Andréolle, Donna and Véronique Molinari (eds.), 2011. Women and Science, 17th Century to Present: Pioneers, Activists and Protagonists, Newcastle upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars.
  • Spelman, Elizabeth, 1988. Inessential Woman: Problems of Exclusion in Feminist Thought, Boston: Beacon Press.
  • Tuana, Nancy, 1993. The Less Noble Sex: Scientific, Religious, and Philosophical Conceptions of Woman's Nature, Bloomington: Indiana University Press.
  • Tuana, Nancy, 1992. Woman and the History of Philosophy, New York: Paragon House.
  • Tuana, Nancy (ed.), 1994–. Re-Reading the Canon Series, Pennsylvania State University Press.
  • Waithe, Mary Ellen (ed.), 1987–1991. A History of Women Philosophers, Vol. 1–3, Kluwer Academic Publishing.
  • Warnock, Mary (ed.), 1996. Women Philosophers, London: J. M. Dent.
  • Warren, Mary Anne, 1980. The Nature of Woman: An Encyclopaedia and Guide to the Literature, Reyes, CA: Edgepress.
  • Warren, Karen (ed.), 2009. An unconventional history of Western philosophy: conversations between men and women philosophers, Rowman & Littlefield. [Includes primary sources for Hildegard of Bingen, as well as Princess Elisabeth, Macualay, Masham, Conway, Wollstonecraft, van Schurman.]
  • Zinsser, Judith P (ed.), 2005. Men, Women, and the Birthing of Modern Science, DeKalb: Northern Illinois University Press.

Articles

  • Atherton, Margaret, n.d. “Doing the History of Philosophy as a Feminist,” American Philosophical Association Newsletter on Feminism and Philosophy, L. Antony and D. Meyers (eds.).
  • Bell, Linda A., 1984. “Gallantry: What it is and Why it Should Not Survive,” Southwestern Journal of Philosophy, 22: 165–174.
  • Code, Lorraine, 1986. “Simple Equality is Not Enough,” Australasian Journal of Philosophy, Supp., 64.
  • Finucci, V., 2005. “In the Footsteps of Petrarch,” Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies, 35(3): 457–466. [Discusses Isotta Nogarola as well as Renaissance women such as Laura Cereta.]
  • Kelly, Joan, 1988. “Early Feminist Theory and the Querelle des Femmes: 1400–1789,” in Women, History, Theory: The Essays of Joan Kelly, Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 65–109.
  • Lloyd, Genevieve, 1979. “The Man of Reason,” Metaphilosophy, 10(1): 18–37.
  • Lloyd, Genevieve, 1993. “Maleness, Metaphor, and the ‘Crisis’ of Reason,” in A Mind of One’s Own: Feminist Essays on Reason and Objectivity, Antony and Witt (eds.), Boulder, CO: Westview Press, 69–84.
  • Monter, E. William, 1980. “Women in Calvinist Geneva (1550–1800),” Signs, 6(2): 189–209. Article Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org.proxy.lib.sfu.ca/stable/3173922.
  • Olkowski, Dorothea, 1997. “Materiality and Language: Butler's Interrogation of the History of Philosophy,” Philosophy and Social Criticism, 23(3): 37–53.
  • Parsons, Susan Frank, 2004. “To Be or Not To Be: Gender and Ontology,” in Heythrop Journal: A Quarterly Review of Philosophy and Theology, 45(3): 327–343.
  • Rooney, Phyllis, 1991. “Gendered Reason: Sex, Metaphor and Conceptions of Reason,” Hypatia, 6(2): 77–103.
  • Rooney, Phyllis, 1994. “Recent Work in Feminist Discussions of Reason,” American Philosophical Quarterly, 31(1): 1–21.
  • Scheman, Naomi, 1993. “Though This Be Method, Yet There Is Madness in It: Paranoia and Liberal Epistemology,” in A Mind of One’s Own: Feminist Essays on Reason and Objectivity, Antony and Witt (eds.), Boulder, CO: Westview Press, 177–207.
  • Tuana, Nancy, 1988. “The Weaker Seed: The Sexist Bias of Reproductive Theory,” Hypatia, 3: 35–59.
  • Witt, Charlotte, 1993. “Feminist Metaphysics,” in A Mind of One’s Own: Feminist Essays on Reason and Objectivity, Antony and Witt (eds.), Boulder, CO: Westview Press, 273–288.
  • Witt, Charlotte, 2006. “Feminist Interpretations of the Philosophical Canon,” Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society, 31(2): 537–552.
  • Wolff, Robert Paul, 1976. “There's Nobody Here But Us Persons,” in Women and Philosophy: Toward a Theory of Liberation, Carol C. Gould and Marx W. Wartofsky (eds.), New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons.

Ancient

General

Books

  • Allen, P.,1997. The concept of woman: The Aristotelian revolution, 750 BC-AD 1250, Vol. 1, Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing. [Discusses the concept of women in the writings of philosophers of the time.]
  • Archer, L. S. Fischler and M. Wyke (eds.), 1994. Women in Ancient Socieities, London: Routledge.
  • Bar-On, Bat Ami (ed.), 1994. Engendering Origins: Critical Feminist Readings in Plato and Aristotle, Albany: SUNY Press.
  • DuBois, Page, 1998. Sowing the Body: Psychoanalysis and Ancient Representations of Women, Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
  • Mahowald, Mary Briody (ed.), 1983. Philosophy of Woman: An Anthology of Classic and Current Concepts, Second Edition, Indianapolis: Hackett.
  • Nussbaum, Martha, 1986. The Fragility of Goodness: Luck and Ethics in Greek Tragedy and Philosophy, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Peradotto, J. and J. P. Sullivan (eds.), 1984. Women in the Ancient World: The Arethusa Papers, Albany: SUNY Press.
  • Pomeroy, Sarah, 1975. Goddesses, Whores, Wives, and Slaves: Women in Classical Antiquity, New York: Schocken Books.
  • Pomeroy, Sarah, 1984. Women in Hellenistic Egypt: From Alexander to Cleopatra, New York: Schocken Books.
  • Rabinowitz, Nancy, 1993. Anxiety Veiled: Euripides and the Traffic in Women, Ithaca: Cornell University Press.
  • Rabinowitz, Nancy, 1993. Feminist Theory and the Classics, New York and London: Routledge.
  • Snyder, Jane, 1988. The Women and the Lyre: Women Writers in Classical Greece and Rome, Carbondale: South Illinois University Press.
  • Ward, Julie K., 1996. Feminism and Ancient Philosophy, New York and London: Routledge.
  • Wright, F. A., 1969. Feminism in Greek Literature: From Homer to Aristotle, Port Washington: Kennikat Press.

Articles

  • Arthur, Marilyn, 1984. “Early Greece: The Origin of the Western Attitude Toward Women,” in Women and the Ancient World: The Arethusa Paper, J. Perradotto and J. P. Sullivan (eds.), Albany: SUNY Press.
  • Asmis, Elizabeth, 1996. “The Stoics on Women,” in Feminism and Ancient Philosophy, Julie K. Ward (ed.), New York and London: Routledge.
  • Brumbaugh, Robert and John Burnham, 1989. “Coins and Classical Philohophy,” Teaching Philosophy, 12: 243–255.
  • Connell, Sophia M., 2000. “Aristotle and Galen on Sex Difference and Reproduction: A New Approach to an Ancient Rivalry,” in Studies in History and Philosophy of Science, 31A(3): 405–427.
  • Freeland, Cynthia, 2000. “Feminism and Ideology in Ancient Philosophy,” in Apeiron: A Journal for Ancient Philosophy and Science, 33(4): 365–406.
  • Gottner Abendroth, Heide, 1991. The Dancing Goddess: Principles of a Matriarchal Aesthetic, Maureen T. Krause (trans.), Boston: Beacon Press.
  • Hawkesworth, Mary E., 1987. “Re/Vision: Feminist Theory Confronts the Polis,” Social Theory and Practice, 13: 155–186.
  • Katz, Marilyn, 1992. “Ideology and ‘The Status of Women’ in Ancient Greece,” History and Theory, 31(4): 70–97.
  • Kotzin, Rhoda Hadassah, 1998. “Ancient Greek Philosophy,” in A Companion to Feminist Philosophy, Alison M. Jaggar (ed.), Cambridge: Blackwell.
  • Molinaro, Ursule, 1989. “A Christian Martyr in Reverse Hypatia: 370–415 A.D.,” Hypatia, 4: 6–8.
  • Nussbaum, Martha, 1996. “Therapeutic Arguments and Structures of Desire,” in Feminism and Ancient Philosophy, Julie K. Ward (ed.), New York and London: Routledge.
  • Perez-Estevez, Antonio, 1986. “Feminidad Y Racionalidad En El Pensamiento Griego,” Rev. Filosof (Venezuela), 9: 167–199.
  • Skinner, Marilyn (ed.), 1987. “Rescuing Creusa: New Methodological Approaches to Women in Antiquity,” Special Issue of Helios, 13(2).
  • Smith, Nicholas, 1983. “Plato and Aristotle on the Nature of Women,” Journal of the History of Philosophy, 21: 467–478.
  • Spelman, Elizabeth, 1984. “Anger and Insubordination,” in Beyond Domination: New Perspectives on Women and Philosophy, Carol Gould (ed.), Totowa NJ: Rowman & Allanheld.
  • Spelman, Elizabeth V., 1982. “Woman as Body: Ancient and Contemporary View,” Feminist Studies, 8: 109–131.
  • Thompson, Patricia J., 1996. “Re-Claiming Hestia: Goddess of Everyday Life,” Philosophy in the Contemporary World, 3(4): 20–28.
  • Thompson, Patricia J., 2000. “Hestian Thinking in Antiquity and Modernity: Pythagorean Women Philosophers and 19th Century Domestic Scientists,” in Philosophy in the Contemporary World, 7(2–3): 71–82.
  • Wartenberg, Thomas E., 1988. “Teaching Women Philosophy,” Teaching Philosophy, 11: 15–24.
  • Whitbeck, Caroline, 1976. “Theories of Sex Difference,” in Women and Philosophy: Toward a Theory of Liberation, Carol C. Gould and Marx W. Wartofsky (eds.), New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons.
  • Wider, Kathleen, 1986. “Women Philosophers in the Ancient World: Donning the Mantle,” Hypatia, 1: 21–62.
  • Wiseman, Mary Bittner, 1993. “Beautiful Exiles in Aesthetics,” in Aesthetics in Feminist Perspective, Hilde Hein (ed.), Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 169–178.

Aristotle

Books

  • Bickford, Susan, 1996. The Dissonance of Democracy: Listening, Conflict, and Citizenship, Ithaca: Cornell University Press.
  • Fortenbaugh, W. W., 1975. Aristotle on Emotion: A Contribution to Philosophical Psychology, Rhetoric, Poetics, Politics, and Ethics, New York: Harper & Row.
  • Freeland, Cynthia, 1998. Feminist Interpretations of Aristotle, University Park: Pennsylvania University Press.
  • Holland, Nancy, 1998. The Madwoman's Dream: The Concept of the Appropriate in Ethical Thought, University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.
  • Tessman, Lisa, 2005. Burdened Virtues: Virtue Ethics for Liberatory Struggles (Studies in Feminist Philosophy), New York: Oxford University Press.

Articles

  • Achtenberg, Deborah, 1996. “Aristotelian Resources for Feminist Thinking,” in Feminism and Ancient Philosophy, Julie K. Ward (ed.), New York and London: Routledge.
  • Achtenberg, Deborah, 1989. “The Role of the Ergon Argument in Aristotle's Nichomachean Ethics,” Ancient Philosophy, 9(1).
  • Allen, Christine Garside, 1971. “Can a Woman be Good in the Same Way as a Man?” Dialogue, 10: 534–544.
  • Berman, Ruth, 1989. “From Aristotle's Dualism to Materialist Dialectics: Feminist Transformation of Science and Society,” in Gender/Body/Knowledge: Feminist Reconstructions of Being and Knowing, Alison M. Jaggar and Susan R. Bordo (eds.), New Brunswick: Rutgers University Press.
  • Cavarero, Adriana, 1992. “Equality and Sexual Difference,” in Beyond Equality and Difference, Gisela Bock (ed.), New York: Routledge.
  • Cole, Eve Browning, 1994. “’Women, Slaves, and Love of Toil’ in Aristotle's Moral Philosophy,” in Engendering Origins, Bat-Ami Bar On (ed.), Albany: SUNY Press.
  • Cook, Kathleen C., 1996. “Sexual Inequality in Aristotle's Theories of Reproduction and Inheritance,” in Feminism and Ancient Philosophy, Julie K. Ward (ed.),New York and London: Routledge.
  • Curd, Patricia, 1996. “Aristotelian Visions of Moral Character in Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway,” in Feminism and Ancient Philosophy, Julie K. Ward (ed.), New York and London: Routledge.
  • Curran, Angela, 1998. “Feminism and the Narrative Structures of the ‘Poetics,’” in Feminist Interpretations of Aristotle, Cynthia A. Freeland (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania University Press.
  • Deslauriers, Marguerite, 1998. “Sex and Essence in Aristotle's ‘Metaphysics’ and ‘Biology,’” in Feminist Interpretations of Aristotle, Cynthia A. Freeland (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania University Press.
  • Deslauriers, Marguerite, 2009. “Sexual Difference in Aristotle's Politics and His Biology,” Classical World, 102(3): 215–231.
  • Fememias, Maria Luisa, 1994. “Women and Natural Hierarchy in Aristotle,” Hypatia, 9(1): 164–172.
  • Fortenbaugh, W. W., 1977. “Aristotle on Slaves and Women,” in Articles on Aristotle: 2, Ethics and Politics, J. Barnes, J. Schofield, and R. Sorabji (eds.), London: Duckworth.
  • Freeland, Cynthia A., 1994. “Nourishing Speculation: A Feminist Reading of Aristotelian Science,” in Engendering Origins, Bat-Ami Bar On (ed.), Albany: SUNY Press.
  • Freeland, Cynthia A., 1988. “On Irigaray on Aristotle,” in Feminist Interpretations of Aristotle, Cynthia A. Freeland (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania University Press, 1998.
  • Green, Judith, 1992. “Aristotle on Necessary Verticality, Body Heat, and Gendered Proper Places in the Polis: A Feminist Critique,” Hypatia, 7(1): 70–96.
  • Groenhout, Ruth, 1998. “The Virtue of Care: Aristotelian Ethics and Contemporary Ethics of Care,” in Feminist Interpretations of Aristotle, Cynthia A. Freeland (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania University Press.
  • Halwani, Raja, 2003. “Care Ethics and Virtue Ethics,” in Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy, 18(3): 160–192.
  • Hass, Marjorie, 1998. “Feminist Readings of Aristotelian Logic,” in Feminist Interpretations of Aristotle, Cynthia A. Freeland (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania University Press.
  • Hein, Hilde, 1989. “Liberating Philosophy: An End to the Dichotomy of Spirit and Matter,” in Women, Knowledge, and Reality: Explorations in Feminist Philosophy, Ann Garry and Marilyn Pearsall (eds.), Boston: Unwin Hyman.
  • Henry, Devin M., 2007. “How Sexist is Aristotle's Developmental Biology?,” Phronesis, 52: 251–269.
  • Hirschman, Linda Redlick, 1998. “The Book of ‘A,’” in Feminist Interpretations of Aristotle, Cynthia A. Freeland (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania University Press.
  • Nielsen, Karen, 2008. “The Private Parts of Animals: Aristotle on the Teleology of Sexual Difference,” Phronesis, 53: 373–405.
  • Homiak, Marcia, 1996. “Feminism and Aristotle's Rational Ideal,” in Feminism and Ancient Philosophy, Julie K. Ward (ed.), New York and London: Routledge.
  • Horowitz, Maryanne Cline, 1976. “Aristotle and Women,” Journal of the History of Biology, 9: 183–213.
  • Irigaray, Luce, 1998. “Place, Interval: A Reading of Aristotle's ‘Physics IV,’” in Feminist Interpretations of Aristotle, Cynthia A. Freeland (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania University Press.
  • Krebs, Angelika, 2000. “Freundschaft und Liebe bei Aristoteles und Hugh LaFollette,” in Dialektik: Zeitschrift fuer kulturphilosophie, 1: 149–166.
  • Koziak, Barbara, 1998. “Tragedy, Citizens, and Strangers: The Configuration of Aristotelian Political Emotion,” in Feminist Interpretations of Aristotle, Cynthia A. Freeland (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania University Press.
  • Lange, Lynda, 1983. “Woman is Not a Rational Animal: On Aristotle's Biology of Reproduction,” in Discovering Reality: Feminist Perspectives on Epistemology, Metaphysics, Methodology, and Philosophy of Science, Sandra Harding and Merrill B. Hintikka (eds.), Dordrecht: Reidel.
  • Matthews, Gareth B., 1986. “Gender and Essence in Aristotle,” Australasian Journal of Philosophy, Supp., 64: 16–25.
  • Merleau, Chloe Taylor, 2003. “Bodies, Genders, and Causation in Aristotle's Biological and Political Theory,” in Ancient Philosophy, 23(1): 125–151.
  • Modrak, Deborah K. W., 1998. “Aristotle's Theory of Knowledge and Feminist Epistemology,” in Feminist Interpretations of Aristotle, Cynthia A. Freeland (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania University Press.
  • Modrak, Deborah, 1994. “Aristotle: Women, Deliberation, and Nature,” in Engendering Origins, Bat-Ami Bar On (ed.), Albany: SUNY Press.
  • Morsink, Johannes, 1979. “Was Aristotle's Biology Sexist?” Journal of the History of Biology, 12(1): 83–112.
  • Mulgan, Richard, 1994. “Aristotle and the Political Role of Women,” History of Political Thought, 15(2): 179–202.
  • Nussbaum, Martha, 1998. “Aristotle, Feminism, and Needs for Functioning,” in Feminist Interpretations of Aristotle, Cynthia A. Freeland (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania University Press.
  • Poster, Carol, 1998. “(Re) Positioning Pedagogy: A Feminist Historiography of Aristotle's ‘Rhetorica,’” in Feminist Interpretations of Aristotle, Cynthia A. Freeland (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania University Press.
  • Reutsche, Laura, 2004. “Virtue and Contingent History: Possibilities for Feminist Epistemology” in Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy, 19(1): 73–101.
  • Rosenberg, Rosalind,1975. “In Search of Woman's Nature, 1850–1920,” Feminist Studies, 3: 141–154.
  • Sakezles, Priscilla K., 1999. “Feminism and Aristotle,” Apeiron, 32(1): 67–74.
  • Schollmeier, Paul, 2003. “Aristotle and Women: Household and Political Roles,” in Polis: The Journal of the Society for the Study of Greek Political Thought, 20(1–2): 22–42.
  • Senack, Christine M., 1994. “Aristotle on the Woman's Soul,” in Engendering Origins, Bat-Ami Bar On (ed.), Albany: SUNY Press.
  • Spelman, Elizabeth V., 1983. “Aristotle and the Politicization of the Soul,” in Discovering Reality: Feminist Perspectives on Epistemology, Metaphysics, Methodology, and Philosophy of Science, Sandra Harding and Merrill B. Hintikka (eds.), Dordrecht: Reide.
  • Stiehm, Judith Hicks, 1983. “The Unit of Political Analysis: Our Aristotelian Hangover,” in Discovering Reality: Feminist Perspectives on Epistemology, Metaphysics, Methodology, and Philosophy of Science, Sandra Harding and Merrill B. Hintikka (eds.), Dordrecht: Reidel.
  • Thom, P., 1976. “Stiff Cheese For Women,” Philosophical Forum, 8(1): 94–107.
  • Tress, Daryl McGowan, 1992. “The Metaphysical Science of Aristotle's ‘Generation of Animals,’ and It Feminist Critics,” Review of Metaphysics, 46(2): 307–341. Reprinted in Feminism and Ancient Philosophy, Julie K. Ward (ed.), 1996, New York and London: Routledge.
  • Tuana, Nancy, 1994. “Aristotle and the Politics of Reproduction,” in Engendering Origins, Bat-Ami Bar On (ed.), Albany: SUNY Press.
  • Tumulty, Peter, 1981. “Aristotle, Feminism, and Natural Law Theory,” New Scholars, 55: 450–464.
  • Ward, Julia K., 1996. “Aristotle on Philia: The Beginning of a Feminist Ideal of Friendship,” in Feminism and Ancient Philosophy, Julie K. Ward (ed.), New York and London: Routledge.
  • Whitbeck, Caroline, 1976. “Theories of Sex Difference,” in Women and Philosophy: Toward a Theory of Liberation, Carol C. Gould and Marx W. Wartofsky (eds.), New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons.
  • Witt, Charlotte, 1998. “Form, Normativity, and Gender in Aristotle: A Feminist Perspective,” in Feminist Interpretations of Aristotle, Cynthia A. Freeland (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania University Press.
  • Zack, Naomi, 2001. “Intra-Feminist Criticism and Intellectual Virtue,” in Newsletter on Feminism and Philosophy (American Philosophical Association Newsletters), 00(2): 83–84.

Plato

Books

  • Bluestone, Natalie Harris, 1987. Women and the Ideal Society: Plato's Republic and Modern Myths of Gender, Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press.
  • Buchan, Morag, 1999. Women in Plato's Political Theory, New York: Routledge.
  • Tuana, Nancy (ed.), 1994. Feminist Interpretations of Plato, University Park: Pennsylvania University Press.

Articles

  • Allen, Christine Garside, 1975. “Plato on Women,” Feminist Studies, 2(2–3): 132.
  • Annas, Julia, 1996. “Plato's Republic and Feminism,” Philosophy, 51: 309. Reprinted in Feminism and Ancient Philosophy, Julie K. Ward (ed.), 1996, New York and London: Routledge.
  • Bluestone, Natalie Harris, 1994. “Why Women Cannot Rule: Sexism in Plato Scholarship,” in Feminist Interpretations of Plato, Nancy Tuana (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 109–130.
  • Bowery, Anne-Marie, 1996. “Diotima Tells a Story: A Narrative Analysis of Plato's ‘Symposium,’” in Feminism and Ancient Philosophy, Julie K. Ward (ed.), New York and London: Routledge.
  • Bowery, Anne-Marie, 1995. “Plato Visits Postmodernity,” Southwest Philosophy Review, 11: 135–142.
  • Brown, Wendy, 1988. “ ’Supposing Truth Were a Woman’: Plato's Subversion of Masculine Discourse,” Political Theory, 16: 594–616.
  • Calvert, Brian, 1975. “Plato and the Equality of Women,” Phoenix, 29(3).
  • Canto, Monique, 1994. “The Politics of Women's Bodies: Reflections on Plato,” Arthur Goldhammer (trans.), in Feminist Interpretations of Plato, Nancy Tuana (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 49–66.
  • Cappelletti, Angel J., 1980.“Sobre El Feminismo De Platon,” Revista de Filosofio (Venezuela), 12: 87–96, (Spanish).
  • Darling, John, 1986. “Are Women Good Enough: Plato's Feminism Re-Examined,” Journal of Philosophy in Education, 20: 123–128.
  • De Pater, W. and W. Van Langendonck, 1989. “Natuurlijkheid Van De Taal En Iconiciteit: Plato En Hedendaagse Taaltheorieen,” Tijdschr Filosof, 51: 256–297. (Dutch/Flemish)
  • Dickason, Anne, 1976. “Anatomy and Destiny: The Role of Biology in Plato's Views of Women,” The Philosophical Forum, V (Fall-Winter 1973–1974). Reprinted in Women and Philosophy: Toward a Theory of Liberation, Carol C. Gould and Marx W. Wartofsky (eds.), 1976. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons.
  • duBois, Page, 1994. “The Platonic Appropriation of Reproduction,” in Feminist Interpretations of Plato, Nancy Tuana (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 139–156.
  • Fortenbaugh, W. W., 1975. “On Plato's Feminism in ‘Republic V,’,” Apeiron, IX(2).
  • Freeman, Barbara, 1988. “(Re)writing Patriarchal Texts: The Symposium,” in Postmodernism and Continental Philosophy, Hugh J. Silverman and Donn Welton (eds.), Albany: SUNY Press.
  • Gardner, Catherine, 2000. “The Remnants of the Family: The Role of Women and Eugenics in Republic V” in History of Philosophy Quarterly, 17(3): 217–235.
  • Genova, Judith, 1994. “Feminist Dialectics: Plato and Dualism,” in Engendering Origins, Bat-Ami Bar On (ed.), Albany: SUNY Press.
  • Gould, Timothy, 1982. “Intensity and its Audiences: Notes Towards a Feminist Perspective,” Canadian Journal of Philosophy, 12: 287–302.
  • Hampton, Cynthia, 1994. “Overcoming Dualism: The Importance of the Intermediate in Plato's Philebus,” in Engendering Origins, Bat-Ami Bar On (ed.), Albany: SUNY Press.
  • Hawthorne, Susan, 1994. “Diotima Speaks Through the Body,” in Engendering Origins, Bat-Ami Bar On, (ed.), Albany: SUNY Press, 1994.
  • Irigaray, Luce, 1995. “Sorcerer's Love: A Reading of Plato's ‘Symposium,’” Eleanor H. Kuykendall (trans.), in Feminism and Philosophy: Essential Readings in Theory, Reinterpretation, and Application, Boulder: Westview Press.
  • Jacobs, William, 1978. “Plato on Female Emancipation and the Traditional Family,” Apeiron, 12: 24–31.
  • Joo, Maria, 1996. “The Platonic ‘Eros’ and Its Feminist Interpretations,” Magyar Filozofiai Szemle, 1–2-3: 1–30 (Hungarian).
  • Kofman, Sarah, 2002. “Socrates and his Twins (The Socrates(es) of Plato's Symposium)” in Feminism and History of Philosophy, Genevieve Lloyd (ed.), New York: Oxford University Press, 41–67.
  • Lange, Lynda, 1979. “The Function of Equal Education in Plato's ‘Republic’ and ‘Laws,’” in The Sexism of Social and Political Theory, L. Clark and L. Lange (eds.), Toronto: University of Toronto Press.
  • Lesser, Harry, 1979. “Plato's Feminism,” Philosophy, 54: 113–117.
  • Levin, Susan B., 1996. “Women's Nature and Role in the Ideal Polis: ‘Republic V’ Revisited,” in Feminism and Ancient Philosophy, Julie K. Ward (ed.), New York and London: Routledge.
  • Levin, Susan B., 2000. “Plato's On Women's Nature: Reflections on the Laws” in Ancient Philosophy, 20(1): 81–97.
  • Lovibond, Sabina, 1994. “An Ancient Theory of Gender: Plato and the Pythagorean Table,” in Women in Ancient Societies, Archer, Fischler, and Wyke (eds.), London: Routledge), 88–101.
  • Mansfeld, Jaap, 1987. “Plato Over De Vrouw,” Alg. Ned. Tijdschr Wijs, 79: 199–120, (Dutch/Flemish).
  • Marquez, Alvaro, 1986. “El Tema De Lo Femenino En Platon,” Revista de Filosofio (Venezuela), 9: 33–41, (Spanish).
  • Martin, Jane R, 1977. “Equality and Education in Plato,” in Feminism and Philosophy, M. Vetterling-Braggin, F. A. Elliston, J. English (eds.), Totowa, NJ: Littlefield.
  • Nye, Andrea, 1989. “The Hidden Host: Irigaray and Diotima at Plato's Symposium,” Hypatia, 3: 45–61.
  • Nye, Andrea, 1994. “Irigaray and Diotima at Plato's Symposium” in Feminist Interpretations of Plato, Nancy Tuana (ed.),University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 197–216.
  • Okin, Susan Moller, 1977. “Philosopher Queens and Private Wives: Plato on Women and the Family,” Philosophy and Public Affairs, 6(Summer).
  • Osborne, Martha Lee, 1975. “Plato's Unchanging View of Woman: A Denial That Anatomy Spells Destiny,” The Philosophical Forum, Summer.
  • Pierce, Christine, 1973. “Equality: ‘Republic V,’” The Monist, 57(January).
  • Pierce, Christine, 1994. “Eros and Epistemology,” in Engendering Origins, Bat-Ami Bar On (ed.), Albany: SUNY Press.
  • Pomeroy, Sarah, 1974. “Feminism in Book V of Plato's ‘Republic,’” Apeiron, VIII(1).
  • Santas, Gerasimos, 2005. “Justice, Law, and Women in Plato's Republic” in Philosophical Inquiry: International Quarterly, 27(1–2): 25–37.
  • Saxenhouse, Arlene W., 1984. “Eros and the Female in Greek Political Thought: An Interpretation of Plato's ‘Symposium,’” Political Theory, 12: 5–27.
  • Saxenhouse, Arlene W., 1976. “The Philosopher and the Female in the Political Thought of Plato,” Political Theory, 4(May): 195–212.
  • Senter, Nell W., 1977. “Plato on Women,” Southwest Philosophical Studies, 2: 4–13.
  • Smith, Janet Farrell, 1983. “Plato, Irony and Equality,” Hypatia, WSIF 1: 597–607.
  • Smith, Nicholas, 1980. “The Logic of Plato's Feminism,” Journal of Social Philosophy, 11: 5–11.
  • Spelman, Elizabeth V., 1994. “Hairy Cobblers and Philosopher-Queens” in Feminist Interpretations of Plato, Nancy Tuana (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 87–108.
  • Tress, Daryl McGowan, 1994. “Relations in Plato's ‘Timaeus,’” Journal of Neoplatonic Studies, 3: 93–139.
  • Tuana, Nancy and William Cowling, 1994. “The Presence and Absence of the Feminine in Plato's Philosophy” in Feminist Interpretations of Plato, Nancy Tuana (ed)., University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 243–269.
  • Vlastos, Gregory, 1989. “Was Plato a Feminist?” Times Literary Supplement, 276: 288–289. Cited from Studies in Greek Philosophy, ed. Daniel W. Graham, 1995. Volume 2: Socrates, Plato, and Their Tradition, Princeton: Princeton University Press), 133–143.
  • Wender, Dorothea, 1973. “Plato: Misogynist, Paedophile and Feminist,” Arethusa, VI (Spring).

St. Paul

  • Dubarle, A. M., 1976. “Paul et L'Antifeminisme,” Revue des Sciences Philosophiques et Theologiques, 60: 261–280 (French).

Medieval Philosophy

General

Books

  • Allen, P., 2002–2005. The Concept of Woman: The Early Humanist Reformation, 1250–1500, parts 1–2 (Vols. 2–3), William B. Eerdmans Publishing. [Discusses the concept of women in the writings of philosophers of the time]
  • Bennett, J. M. and Karras, R. M. (eds.), 2013. The Oxford Handbook of Women and Gender in Medieval Europe, Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.
  • Benson, P. J. and Kirkham, V. (eds.), 2005. Strong voices, weak history: early women writers & canons in England, France, & Italy, Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press. [Includes Isotta Nogarola and Christine de Pizan, among others.]
  • Borresen, Kari Elisabeth (ed.), 1991. Images of God and Gender Models: in Judaeo-Christian Tradition, Atlantic Highlands: Humanities Press.
  • Brabant, Margaret (ed.), 1992. Politics, Gender, and Genre: The Political Thought of Christine de Pizan, Boulder: Westview Press.
  • Bynum, C. W., 2013. Resurrection of the Body, New York: Columbia University Press. [Includes extensive sections on Herrad of Hohenbourg and Hildegard von Bingen]
  • Dinshaw, C. and Wallace, D. (eds.), 2003. The Cambridge companion to medieval women's writing, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. [Includes Christine de Pizan and Julian of Norwich, among others.]
  • Gracia, J. J. & Noone, T. B. (eds.), 2008. A companion to philosophy in the Middle Ages, New Jersey: John Wiley & Sons. [Includes Hildegard of Bingen, among others]
  • Griffiths, F. J., 2011. The garden of delights: reform and renaissance for women in the twelfth century, Pennsylvania: University of Pennsylvania Press. [Includes Hildegard von Bingen]
  • Minnis, A. J. and Voaden, R. (eds.), 2010. Medieval Holy Women in the Christian Tradition, C. 1100-c. 1500, Belgium: Brepols Publishing.
  • Niebrzydowski, S. (ed.), 2011. Middle-aged Women in the Middle Ages (Vol. 7 in the Gender in the Middle Ages Series), Cambridge: DS Brewer.
  • Suydam, Mary A. and Joanne E. Zeigler, 1999. Performance and Transformation: New Approaches to Late Medieval Spirituality, New York: St. Martin's Press.

Articles

  • Green, Karen, 1994. “Christine de Pisan and Thomas Hobbes,” Philosophical Quarterly, 44(177): 456–475.
  • Hollywood, Amy M., 1994. “Beauvoir, Irigaray, and the Mystical,” Hypatia, 9(4): 158–185.
  • John, Helen J., 1992. “Hildegard of Bingen: A New Medieval Philosopher?” Hypatia, 7(1): 115–123.
  • King, M. L., 2005. “Petrarch, the self-conscious self, and the first women humanists,” Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies, 35(3): 537–558.
  • McLaughlin, Eleanor, 1974. “Equality of Souls, Inequality of Sexes: Women in Medieval Theology,” in Religion and Sexism, Rosemary Ruether (ed.), New York: Simon & Schuster.
  • Ruether, Rosemary, 1974. “Misogynism and Virginal Feminism in the Fathers of the Church,” in Religion and Sexism, Rosemary Ruether (ed.), New York: Simon & Schuster.

Akka Mahadevi (Akkamahadevi)

Books

  • Prackash, Shiva, 2010. Songs for Siva: Vacanas of Akka Mahadevi (Sacred Literature Trust Series), Vinaya Chaitanya (trans.), Connecticut: Yale University Press.

Articles

  • Narayanan, Vasudha, 2005. “Gender and Priesthood in the Hindu Traditions,” Journal of Hindu-Christian Studies, 18(8).
  • Mudaliar, C. Y., 1991. “Religious Experiences of Hindu Women: A study of Akka Mahadevi,” Mystics Quarterly, 17(3): 137–146.

St. Thomas Aquinas

Books

  • Traina, Cristina L. H., 1999. Feminist Ethics and Natural Law: The End of the Anathemas, Washington DC: Georgetown University Press.

Articles

  • Hartel, Joseph, 1996. “The Integral Feminism of St. Thomas Aquinas,” Gregorianum, 77(3): 527–547.
  • Hein, Hilde, 1989. “Liberating Philosophy: An End to the Dichotomy of Spirit and Matter,” in Women, Knowledge, and Reality: Explorations in Feminist Philosophy, Ann Garry and Marilyn Pearsall (eds.), Boston: Unwin Hyman.
  • Lavaud, B., 1940. “Toward a Theology of Woman,” Thomist, 2: 459–518.
  • Snow, Nancy, 2003. “Feminism and Natural Law Theory: Irreconcilable Differences?” in Vera Lex, 4(1–2): 5–21.

St. Augustine

Articles

  • Borresen, Kari Elisabeth, 1994. “Patristic ‘Feminism’: The Case of Augustine,” Augustinian Studies, 25: 139–152.
  • Duval, Shannon, 1993. “Augustine's Radiant Confessional--Theatre of Prophecy,” Contemporary Philosophy, 15(2): 1–4.

The Beguines, including Marguierite Porete and Mechthild of Magdeburg

Books

  • Field, S. L., 2012. The Beguine, the Angel, and the Inquisitor: The Trials of Marguerite Porete and Guiard of Cressonessart, Indiana: University of Notre Dame Press.
  • McDonnell, E.W., 1954. The Beguines and Beghards in Medieval Culture: With Special Emphasis on the Belgian Scene, New Brunswick, N.J.: Rutgers University Press.
  • Mechthild of Magdeburg, 1998. The flowing light of the Godhead, F. J. Tobin (ed. and trans.), Mahwah, New Jersey: Paulist Press.
  • Murk-Jansen, S., 2004. Brides in the Desert: the spirituality of the Beguines, Eugene, Oregon: Wipf and Stock Publishers.
  • Porete, Marguierite, 1993. The mirror of simple souls, Ellen Babinsky (trans.), Mahwah, New Jersey: Paulist Press.
  • Simons, Walter, 2001. Cities of Ladies: Beguine Communities in the Medieval Low Countries, 1200–1565, Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press. ISBN 978–0-8122–1853–4.

Articles

  • Marin, J., 2010. “Annihilation and Deification in Beguine Theology and Marguerite Porete's Mirror of Simple Souls,” Harvard Theological Review, 103: 89–109. [Discusses moral duty.]
  • Neel, C., 1989. “The origins of the beguines,” Signs, 14: 321–341.

Hildegard von Bingen

Books

  • von Bingen, Hildegard, 2005. Hildegard von Bingen: Selected Writings, Mark Atherton (trans.), Penguin Classics.
  • Flanagan, S., 2002. Hildegard of Bingen: A visionary life, London: Routledge.
  • Newman, B., 1989. Sister of Wisdom: St. Hildegard's Theology of the Feminine, With a New Preface, Bibliography, and Discography, Oakland: University of California Press.

Articles

  • Corrigan, V. J., 2012. “Hildegard of Bingen,” Icons of the Middle Ages: Rulers, Writers, Rebels, and Saints, Vol 1, Greenword Publishing: 355.
  • Milem, B., 2002. “Hildegard of Bingen,” A Companion to Philosophy in the Middle Ages, Jorge JE Gracia and Timothy B Noone (eds.), Wiley-Blackwell: 318–319.

Heloise

Books

  • Hamilton, Elizabeth, 1966. Heloise, London: Hodder and Stoughton.
  • Radice, Betty, 1974. The Letters of Abelard and Heloise, Middlesex: Penguin Books.

Herrad of Hohenbourg

Books

  • Gibson, J., 1989. Herrad of Hohenbourg, Springer Netherlands.

Articles

  • Gibson, J., 1991. “Herrad of Hohenbourg,” in A History of Women Philosophers, vol 2, Mary Ellen Waithe (ed.), Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers.

Gertrude the Great

Books

  • St Gertrude the Great and the Religious of her Monastery, 2002. Life and Revelations of Saint Gertrude the Great, Charlotte, North Carolina: TAN Books.

Julian of Norwich

Books

  • Julian of Norwich, 1999. Revelations of Divine Love (Short Text and Long Text), Elizabeth Spearing (trans.), Penguin Books.
  • Turner, Denys, 2013. Julian of Norwich: Theologian, New Haven/London: Yale University Press.

Articles

  • Adams, Marilyn, 2011. “Julian of Norwich: Problems of Evil and the Seriousness of Sin,” Philosophia, 39(3): 433–447.
  • Bauerschmidt, Frederick Christian, 1997. “Julian of Norwich-Incorporated,” Modern Theology, 13(1): 75–100.
  • Hartmann, J., 1962. “The Revelations of Divine Love of Julian of Norwich,” Augustinianum, 2(2): 446–447.
  • Hide, Kerrie, 2000. “As verily as God is our Father as verily God is our Mother: the doctrine of the Fatherhood and Motherhood of God in the Showings of Julian of Norwich,” Australasian Catholic Record, 77(3): 259–268.
  • Johnson, Lynn Staley, 1991. “The trope of the scribe and the question of literary authority in the works of Julian of Norwich and Margery Kempe,” Speculum, 66(4): 820–838.
  • Logarbo, Mona, 1986. “Salvation Theology in Julian of Norwich,” Thought, 61(3): 370–380.
  • Park, M. L. Del Mastro, 1989. “Julian of Norwich,” Thought, 64(4): 415–416.
  • Turner, Denys, 2004. “'Sin is behovely' in Julian of norwich's revelations of divine love 1,” Modern Theology, 20(3): 407–422.
  • Watson, Nicholas, 1993. “The Composition of Julian of Norwich's Revelation of Love,” Speculum, 68(3): 637–683.

Christine de Pizan

Books

  • Altmann, B. K., and McGrady, D. L. (eds.), 2003. Christine de Pizan: a casebook, Vol. 34, Hove, UK: Psychology Press.
  • Bell, S. G., 2004. The lost tapestries of the City of ladies: Christine de Pizan's Renaissance legacy, California: University of California Press.
  • Birk, B. A., 2004. Christine de Pizan and biblical Wisdom: A feminist-theological point of view (Marquette Studies in Theology, 47), Milwaukee: Marquette University Press.
  • Brabant, Margaret (ed.), 1992. Politics, Gender, and Genre: The Political Thought of Christine de Pizan, Boulder: Westview Press.
  • Desmond, M., 1998. Christine de Pizan and the Categories of Difference, University of Minnesota Press.
  • de Pizan, Christine, 1997. The selected writings of Christine de Pizan: new translations, criticism, Renate Blumenfeld-Kosinski (trans. and ed.) and Kevin Brownlee (ed.), New York: WW Norton & Company.
  • de Pizan, Christine, 1999 [1405]. The Book of the City of Ladies, Rosalind Brown-Grant (trans.), London: Penguin.
  • Forhan, K. L., 2002. The political theory of Christine de Pizan, Aldershot: Ashgate.
  • Zimmermann, M. & De Rentiis, D. (eds.), 1994. The city of scholars: new approaches to Christine de Pizan, Walter de Gruyter Inc.

Articles

  • Bell, S. G., 1976. “Christine de Pizan (1364–1430): Humanism and the Problem of a Studious Woman,” Feminist Studies, 3(3/4): 173–184.
  • Berges, Sandrine, 2013. “Teaching Christine de Pizan in Turkey,” Gender and Education, 25(5):595–605.
  • Blumenfeld-Kosinski, Renate, 2000. “Saintly Scenarios in Christine de Pizan's Livre des trios vertus,” Mediaeval Studies, 62(1): 255–292.
  • Bornstein, Diane, 1977. “French Influence on Fifteenth-Century English Prose as Exemplified by the Translation of Christine de Pisan's Livre du corps de policie,” Mediaeval Studies, 39(1): 369–386.
  • Dudash, Susan J., 2003. “Christine de Pizan and the 'menu peuple',” Speculum, 78(3): 788–831.
  • Margolis, Nadia, 1996. “The Cry of the Chameleon: Evolving Voices in the Epistles of Christine de Pizan,” Disputatio, 1: 37–70.
  • Margolis, Nadia, 1986. “Christine De Pizan: The Poetess as Historian,” Journal of the History of Ideas, 47(3): 361–375.
  • Martínez, María Lara, 2011. “La emancipación de la mujer en la obra de Christine de Pisan,” Astrolabio: Revista Internacional de Filosofía, 11: 239–245.
  • Green, Karen, 1994. “Christine de Pisan and Thomas Hobbes,” Philosophical Quarterly, 44(177): 456–475.
  • Green, Karen, 2010. “What Were the Ladies in the City of Ladies Reading? The Libraries of Christine de Pizan’s Contemporaries,” Medievalia Et Humanistica, 36: 77–100.
  • Green, Karen, 2011. “Isolated individual or member of a Feminine Courtly Community? Christine de Pizan’s milieu,” in Communities of Learning: Networks and the Shaping of Intellectual Identity in Europe 1100–1500, Constant J. Mews & Crossley John (eds.), Belgium: Brepols.
  • Kirshner, Julius, 2012. “Was bartolo da sassoferrato a source for Christine de pizan?” Mediaeval Studies, 74: 263–282.
  • König-Pralong, Catherine, 2012. “Métaphysique, théologie et politique culturelle chez Christine de Pizan,” Freiburger Zeitschrift für Philosophie Und Theologie, 59(2).
  • Paakkinen, Ilse, 2010. “The case of widows : Christine de Pizan on defending the rights of widows,” in The Nature of Rights: Moral and Political Aspects of Rights in Late Medieval and Early Modern Philosophy, Virpi Mäkinen (ed.), The Philosophical Society of Finland.
  • Primi, Alice, 2011. “Écrits féministes de Christine de Pizan à Simone de Beauvoir, anthologie réunie et présentée par Nicole Pellegrin,” Clio, 2:15–15.

Murasaki Shikibu

Books

  • Kato, Shuichi, 1979. A History of Japanese Literature: The First Thousand Years, David Chibbett (trans.), London: The Macmillan Press.
  • Shikibu, Murasaki, 2002. The Tale of Genji, Royall Tyler (trans.), Penguin Classics.
  • Shikibu, Murasaki, 1996. The Diary of Lady Murasaki, R. Bowring (trans.), Penguin Classics.
  • Shikibu, Murasaki, 1982. Murasaki Shikibu, Her Diary and Poetic Memoirs: A Translation and Study, R Bowring (trans.), New Jersey: Princeton University Press.

Articles

  • Fujiwara No Teika and Meigetsuki, Nanba Hiroshi (ed.), 1972. “Murasaki Shikibu shu no Kenkyu: Koihen, denpon kenkyuhen,” Kasama Sosho, 31.
  • Miner, Earl, 1982. “The Heroine: Identity, Recurrence, Destiny,” in Ukifune: Love in The Tale of Genji, Andrew Pekarik (ed.), New York: Columbia University Press.
  • Miyamoto, Shoson, 1967. “Relation of Philosophical Theory to Practical Affairs in Japan,” in The Japanese Mind, Essentials of Japanese Philosophy and Culture, Charles A. Moore (ed.), Honolulu: East-West Center Press, University of Hawaii Press, 5–6.

Renaissance and Sixteenth Century Philosophy

General

Books

  • Benson, P. J., 2010. Invention of the Renaissance Woman: The Challenge of Female Independence in the Literature and Thought of Italy and England, Penn State Press.
  • Cohn, S. K., 1996. Women in the streets: essays on sex and power in Renaissance Italy, Maryland: Johns Hopkins University Press.
  • Colonna, Vittoria, Chiara Matraini, and Lucrezia Marinella, 2008. Who is Mary?: Three Early Modern Women on the Idea of the Virgin Mary, Susan Haskins (ed. and trans.), Chicago: University of Chicago Press. [Includes Vittoria Colonna, Chiara Matraini, and Lucrezia Marinella.]
  • Ferguson, M. W., M. Quilligan, and N. J. Vickers, 1986. Rewriting the Renaissance: The Discourses of Sexual Difference in Early Modern Europe, Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
  • Jacobs, F. H., 1997. Defining the Renaissance virtuosa: women artists and the language of art history and criticism, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Jordan, C., 1990. Renaissance Feminism: Literary Texts and Political Models, Ithaca: Cornell University Press.
  • Kelly, J., 1984. Women, History and Theory: The Essays of Joan Kelly, Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
  • Kuehn, T. 1994. Law, Family, and Women: Toward a Legal Anthropology of Renaissance Italy, Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
  • King, M. L., 1997. Her Immaculate Hand: Selected Works by and about the Women Humanists of Quattrocento Italy, Medieval & and Renaissance Texts and Studies, 20, Binghamton, New York: Center for Medieval and Early Renaissance Studies.
  • King, M. L., 1991. Women of the Renaissance, Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
  • Maclean, I., 1980. The Renaissance Notion of Woman: A Study in the Fortunes of Scholasticism and Medical Science in European Intellectual Life, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Richardson, Lula McDowell, 1928. The Forerunners of Feminism in French Literature of the Renaissance: From Christine of Pisa to Marie de Gournay, Johns Hopkins studies in Romance Literatures and Languages, 12, Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press.
  • Ross, S. G., 2009, The Birth of Feminism: Woman as Intellect in Renaissance Italy and England, Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press. [Sections are organized by topic, not women. Focus is on 19 women writers from 1400–1700, including interesting discussions about “the intellectual family”. Includes Marinella and Isotta Nogarola.]

Articles

  • Banic-Pajnic, Erna, 2004. “Women in Renaissance Philosophy,” in Prilozi za Istrazivanje Hrvatske Filozofske Bastine, 59–60(1–2): 69–89 (in Serbo-Croatian).
  • Cox, V., 1995. “The Single Self: Feminist Thought and the Marriage Market in Early Modern Venice,” Renaissance Quarterly, 48(3): 513–81.
  • Curtis-Wendlandt, Lisa, 2004. “Conversing on Love: Text and Subtext in Tullia d'Aragona's Dialogo della Infinita d'Amore,” Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy, 19(4): 77–98.
  • Gibson, Joan, 1989. “Educating for Silence: Renaissance Women and the Language Arts,” Hypatia, 4: 9–27.
  • Hurlburt, H. S., 2007. “A Renaissance for Renaissance Women?” Journal of Women's History, 19(2): 193–201.
  • King, M., 1980. “Book-Lined Cells: Women and Humanism in the Early Italian Renaissance,” in Beyond Their Sex: Learned Women of the European Past, P. H. Labalme (ed.), New York and London: New York University Press, 66–90.
  • Zedler, Beatrice H., 1989. “Marie le Jars de Gournay,” in A History of Women Philosophers, Volume II: Medieval, Renaissance and Enlightenment, A. D. 500–1600, Norwell: Kluwer.

Francis Bacon and the Scientific Revolution

Books

  • Merchant, Carolyn, 1980. The Death of Nature: Women, Ecology, and the Scientific Revolution, San Francisco: Harper & Row.

Articles

  • Keller, Evelyn Fox, 1980. “Baconian Science: A Hermaphroditic Birth,” Philosophical Forum, 11(3): 299–308.
  • Landau, Iddo, 1998. “Feminist Criticisms of Metaphors in Bacon's Philosophy of Science,” in Philosophy: The Journal of the Royal Institute of Philosophy, 73(283): 47–61.
  • Potter, Elizabeth, 1988. “Modeling the Gender Politics in Science,” Hypatia, 3: 19–33.

Laura Cereta

Books

  • Cereta, L., 1997. Collected letters of a Renaissance feminist, Diane Robin (ed.), Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Articles

  • Gill, A. M., 2009. “Fraught Relations in the Letters of Laura Cereta: Marriage, Friendship, and Humanist Epistolarity,” Renaissance Quarterly, 62(4): 1098–1129.
  • Rabil, A., 1981. “Laura Cereta: Quattrocento Humanist,” Renaissance Quarterly, 36(2): 231–33.

Cassandra Fedele

Books

  • Fedele, C., 2007. Letters and orations, Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
  • Mayer, T. F. and Woolf, D. R., 1995. The rhetorics of life-writing in early modern Europe: forms of biography from Cassandra Fedele to Louis XIV, Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press.

Articles

  • Fedele, C., 1983. “Cassandra Fedele: Oration for Bertucio Lamberto, Receiving the Honors of the Liberal Arts,” in Her Immaculate Hand: Selected Works by and about the Women Humanists of Quattrocento Italy, Margaret L. King and Albert Rabil, Jr. (trans. and eds.), Binghamton, N.Y.: Medieval and Renaissance Texts and Studies, 69–73.
  • Fedele, C., 1983. “Letters: (a) Alessandra Scala to Cassandra; (b) Cassandra to Alessandra,” in Her Immaculate Hand: Selected Works by and about the Women Humanists of Quattrocento Italy, Margaret L. King and Albert Rabil, Jr. (trans. and eds.), Binghamton, N.Y.: Medieval and Renaissance Texts and Studies, 87–88.
  • Fedele, C., 1983. “Cassandra Fedele: Oration in praise of letters,” in Her Immaculate Hand: Selected Works by and about the Women Humanists of Quattrocento Italy, Margaret L. King and Albert Rabil, Jr. (trans. and eds.), Binghamton, N.Y.: Medieval and Renaissance Texts and Studies, 74–77.
  • Fedele, C., 1983. “Cassandra Fedele: Oration to the Ruler of Venice, Francesco Venerio, on the arrival of the Queen of Poland,” in Her Immaculate Hand: Selected Works by and about the Women Humanists of Quattrocento Italy, Margaret L. King and Albert Rabil, Jr. (trans. and eds.), Binghamton, N.Y.: Medieval and Renaissance Texts and Studies, 1983, 48–50.
  • Ross, S. G., 2007. “Her Father's Daughter: Cassandra Fedele, Woman Humanist of the Venetian Republic,” in COLLeGIUM: Studies Across Disciplines in the Humanities and Social Sciences, Volume 2: The Trouble with Ribs: Women, Men and Gender in Early Modern Europe, Anu Korhonen and Kate Lowe (eds.).

Veronica Gambara

Books

  • Gambara, V., 2012[1759]. Rime E Lettere Di Veronica Gambara, Nabu Press.
  • Gambara, V., 1890. Sonetti amorosi inediti o rari, L. Battei.
  • Gambara, V., 1995. Le rime, Alan Bullock (ed.), Firenze: Leo S. Olschki.

Articles

  • Bozzetti, C., P. Gibellini & E. Sandal (eds.), 1989. Veronica Gambara e la poesia del suo tempo nell'Italia settentrionale: atti del convegno, Brescia-Correggio 17–19 ottobre 1985, Olschki.

Lucrezia Marinella

Books

  • Benson, P. J., 1992. The Invention of the Renaissance Woman: The Challenge of Female Independence in the Literature and Thought of Italy and England, University Park, PA: The Pennsylvania State University Press.
  • Colonna, V., Chiara Matraini, and Lucrezia Marinella, 2008. Who is Mary?: Three early modern women on the idea of the Virgin Mary,Susan Haskins (trans.), Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
  • Marinella, L., 1999. The Nobility and Excellence of Women, and the Defects and Vices of Men, Anne Dunhill (trans.), Chicago: Chicago University Press.
  • Marinella, L., 2009. Enrico; or, Byzantium Conquered: A Heroic Poem, Maria Galli Stampino (trans.), Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Articles

  • Chemello, A, 2000. “The rhetoric of eulogy in Marinella's La nobiltà e l'eccelenza delle donne,” in Women in Italian Renaissance Culture and Society, Panniza, L. (ed.), London: Legenda, 463–77.
  • Kraye, J., 1994. “The Transformation of Plato in the Renaissance,” in Platonism and the English Imagination, A. Baldwin and S. Hutton (eds.), Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Kolsky, S., 2001. “Moderata Fonte, Lucrezia Marinella, Guiseppe Passi: An Early Seventeenth-Century Feminist controversy,” The Modern Language Review, 96(4): 973–89.
  • Malpezzi Price, P. and C. Ristaino, 2008. “Lucrezia Marinella and the 'Querelle des Femmes',” in Seventeenth-Century Italy, Madison: Fairleigh Dickinson University Press.

Isotta Nogarola

Books

  • Nogarola, Isotta, 2003. Complete Writings: Letter book, Dialogue on Adam and Eve, Orations, Margaret L. King and Diana Robin (eds. and trans.), Chicago: Chicago University Press.

Articles

  • Jardine, Lisa, 1983. “Isotta Nogarola: Women humanists‐Education for what?” History of Education, 12(4): 231–144.
  • King, M. L., 1978. “The Religious Retreat of Isotta Nogarola (1418–1466): Sexism and Its Consequences in the Fifteenth Century,” Signs, 3(4): 807–822.
  • Parker, Holt, 2002. “Angela Nogarola (ca. 1400) and Isotta Nogarola (1418–1466): Thieves of Language,” in Women Writing Latin: From Roman Antiquity to Early Modern Europe, Laurie J. Churchill, Phyllis R. Brown, and Jane E. Jeffrey (eds.), New York: Routledge, 11–30.

Oliva Sabuco

Books

  • Oliva Sabuco de Nantes Barrera, 2010. The True Medicine, Gianna Pomata (ed. and trans.), Toronto: Iter.
  • Oliva Sabuco de Nantes Barrera, 2007. New Philosophy of Human Nature: Neither Known to nor Attained by the Great Ancient Philosophers, Which Will Improve Human Life and Health, Mary Ellen Waithe, Maria Colomer Vintro, and C. Angel Zorita (eds. and trans.), Illinois: University of Illinois Press.

Seventeenth Century Philosophy

General

Books

  • Atherton, Margaret (ed.), 1994. Women Philosophers of the Early Modern Period, Indianapolis: Hackett.
  • Boros, Gábor, Herman De Dijn, and Martin Moors (eds.), 2007. The concept of love in 17th and 18th century philosophy, Leuven University Press. [Includes a chapter on the Masam-Astell exchange. Also included in the 18th Century Philosophers Section]
  • Broad, Jacqueline, 2002. Women Philosophers of the Seventeenth Century, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. [Focuses on Elizabeth of Bohemia, Cavendish, Conway, Astell, Masham, Cockburn]
  • Conley, John J., 2002. The Suspicion of Virtue: Women Philosophers in Neoclassical France, Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press. [Includes Madame de Sablé, Madame Deshoulières, Madame de la Sabliére, Mlle de la Vallière, and Madame de Maintenon]
  • Courtney, William Leonard, 1888. Studies new and old, London: Chapman and Hall. [Includes an entire chapter dedicated to Jacqueline. Also includes a chapter on Princess Elisabeth and Descartes.]
  • Craveri, Benedetta and Teresa Waugh, 2005. The Age of Conversation, New York: New York Review Books. [Includes chapters dedicated to de Sable, de la Sabliere, de Maintenon, and others. Spans 17th and 18th Centuries.]
  • Fara, P, 2004. Pandora's breeches: Women, science and power in the enlightenment, London: Random House. [Sections dedicated to Elisabeth/Descartes, Conway/Leibniz, Chatelet/Newton, among others. Spans 17th and 18th Centuries]
  • Pal, Carol, 2012. Republic of Women: Rethinking the Republic of Letters in the Seventeenth Century, Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. [Includes chapters on Elisabeth of Bohemia, Anna Maria van Schurman, Dorothy Moore, Katherine Jones, and Bathsua Makin.]
  • Smith, Hilda L., 1982. Reason's Disciples: Seventeenth-Century English Feminists, Urbana: University of Illinois Press.

Articles

  • Deckard, Michael Funk, 2012. “Acts of Admiration: Wondrous Women in Early Modern Philosophy,” Journal of Early Modern Studies, 1(1). [Elisabeth, Anne Finch/Conway,Mary Astell, and others]
  • Findlen, Paula, 2002. “Ideas in the Mind: Gender and Knowledge in the Seventeenth Century,” Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy, 17(1): 183–196.
  • Ganim, Russell, 1996. “Scientific Verses: Subversion of Cartesian Theory and Practice in the ‘Discours à Madame de la Sablière’,” in Refiguring La Fontaine: Tercentenary Essays, Anne Birberick (ed.), Charlottesville, VA: Rookwood, 101–125.
  • James, Susan, 2002. “The Passions and Philosophy,” in Feminism and History of Philosophy, Genevieve Lloyd (ed.), New York: Oxford University Press, 131–159.
  • Lascano, Marcy, forthcoming. “Early Modern Women on the Cosmological Argument: A Case Study in Feminist History of Philosophy,” in Feminist History of Philosophy: The Recovery and Evaluation of Women's Philosophical Thought, E. O'Neill and M. Lascano (eds.), Dordrecht: Springer.
  • Ogilvie-Bailey, Marilyn, 1986. “La Sablière, Marguerite Hessein de la,” in Women in Science: Antiquity through the Nineteenth Century, Cambridge: MIT Press, 118–119.
  • O'Neill, Eileen, 1998. “Disappearing Ink: Early Modern Philosophers and Their Fate in History,” in Philosophy in a Feminist Voice, Janet Kourany (ed.), Princeton: Princeton University Press.
  • O'Neill, Eileen, 1999. “Women Cartesians, ‘Feminine Philosophy,’ and Historical Exclusion,” in Feminist Interpretations of René Descartes, Susan Bordo (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania University Press.
  • O'Neill, Eileen, 2005. “Early Modern Women Philosophers and the History of Philosophy,” in Hypatia, 20(3): 185–197 Article Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3811122 [Interesting overview that orients many of the women on the list into a conceptual map.]
  • Pateman, Carole, 1988. “Patriarchal Confusions,” International Journal of Moral and Social Studies, 3: 127–143.
  • Rogers, G.A.J., 2004. “Women Philosophers of the Seventeenth Century,” in Philosophical Books, 45(4): 335–339.
  • Shanley, Mary Lyndon, 1982. “Marriage Contract and Social Contract in Seventeenth Century English Political Thought,” in The Family in Political Thought, Jean Bethke Elshtain (ed.), Brighton: Harvester Press.
  • Shapiro, Lisa, 2004. “Some Thoughts on the Place of Women in Early Modern Philosophy,” in Feminist Reflections on the History of Philosophy, L. Alanen and C. Witt (eds.), Klewer Academic Publishing, 219–250.
  • Zedler, Beatrice H., 1989. “The three princesses,” Hypatia, 4(1): 28–63.

Mary Astell

Books

  • Astell, Mary, 1996. Astell: Political Writings, P. Springborg (ed.), Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Astell, Mary, 2002. A Serious Proposal to the Ladies, Parts I and II, P. Springborg (ed.), Ontario: Broadview Literary Texts.
  • Kolbrener, William and Michal Michelson (eds.), 2007. Mary Astell: Reason, Gender, Faith, Aldershot: Ashgate Publishers. [Includes 13 essays on Astell.]
  • Perry, Ruth, 1990. The Celebrated Mary Astell, Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
  • Sowaal, Alice and Penny Weiss, (forthcoming). Feminist Interpretations of Mary Astell, Pennsylvania State University Press.
  • Springborg, Patricia, 2005. Mary Astell: Theorist of Freedom from Domination, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Sutherland, Christine, 2005. The Eloquence of Mary Astell, University of Calgary Press.

Articles

  • Apetrei, Sarah, 2008. “Call No Man Master Upon Earth: Mary Astell's Tory Feminism and an Unknown Correspondence,” Eighteenth-Century Studies, 41(4): 507–523.
  • Alvarez, David P., 2011. “Reason and Religious Tolerance: Mary Astell’s Critique of Shaftesbury,” Eighteenth-Century Studies, 44(4): 475–494.
  • Broad, Jacqueline, 2003. “Adversaries or Allies? Occasional Thoughts on the Masham-Astell Exchange,” Eighteenth-Century Thought, 1: 123–49. [Also listed under Masham]
  • Broad, Jacqueline, 2009. “Mary Astell on Virtuous Friendship,” Parergon, 26(2): 65–86.
  • Bryson, Cynthia B., 1998. “Mary Astell: Defender of the ‘Disembodied Mind,’” Hypatia, 13(4): 40–62.
  • Ellenzweig, Sarah, 2003. “The love of God and the radical enlightenment: Mary Astell's brush with Spinoza”, Journal of the History of Ideas, 64(3): 379–397.
  • Green, Karen, 2012. “When is a Contract Theorist Not A Contract Theorist? Mary Astell and Catherine Macaulay as Critics of Thomas Hobbes,” in Feminist Interpretations of Thomas Hobbes, Nancy J.Hiaschmann and Joanne H. Wright (eds.), University Park, PA: Pennsylvania State University Press. pp 169–189. [Also listed under Catherine Macaulay]
  • Lascano, Marcy P. (forthcoming). “Mary Astell on the Existence and Nature of God,” In Feminist Interpretations of Mary Astell, Alice Sowaal and Penny Weiss (eds.), University Park, PA: Pennsylvania State University Press.
  • Lister, Andrew, 2004. “Marriage and Misogyny: The Place of Mary Astell in the History of Political Thought,” in History of Political Thought, 25(10): 44–72.
  • McCrystal, John, 1993. “Revolting Women: The Use of Revolutionary Discourse in Mary Astell and Mary Wollstonecraft Compared,” History of Political Thought, 14(2): 189–203.
  • Myers, Joanne E., 2013. “Enthusiastic Improvement: Mary Astell and Damaris Masham on Sociability,” Hypatia, 28(3): 533–550. [Also listed under Lady Masham]
  • Nelson, A., 2005. “The Rationalist Impulse,” in A Companion to Rationalism, A. Nelson (ed.), Malden, MA: Blackwell, pp. 3–11.
  • Sowaal, Alice, 2007. “Mary Astell's Serious Proposal: Mind, Method, and Custom,” Philosophy Compass, 2(2): 227–43.
  • Taylor, E. Derek, 2001. “Mary Astell's Ironic Assault on John Locke's Theory of Thinking Matter,” Journal of the History of Ideas, 62/(3): 505–522.
  • Weiss, Penny A., 2004. “Mary Astell: Including Women's Voices in Political Theory,” Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy, 19(3): 63–84.
  • Wilson, Catherine, 2004.“Love of God and Love of Creatures: The Masham-Astell Debate,” History of Philosophy Quarterly, 21 (3): 281–98. [Also listed under Lady Masham]

Aphra Behn

Books

  • Behn, Aphra, 2009. Oroonoko and Other Writings, Oxford University Press.
  • Hughes, Derek, and Janet Todd (eds.), 2004. The Cambridge Companion to Aphra Behn, Cambridge University Press.
  • Hutner, Heidi (ed.), 1993. Rereading Aphra Behn: History, Theory, and Criticism, University of Virginia Press.
  • Kreis-Schinck, Annette, 2001. Women, Writing, and the Theater in the Early Modern Period: The Plays of Aphra Behn and Susanne [ie Susanna] Centlivre, Fairleigh Dickinson Univ Press.
  • O’Donnell, Mary Ann, 2004. Aphra Behn: an annotated bibliography of primary and secondary sources, Ashgate Publishing.
  • Spender, D., 1982. Women of Ideas and What Men Have Done to Them: From Aphra Behn to Adrienne Rich, London: Routledge and Kegan Paul.
  • Wallace, David, 2008. Premodern Places: Calais to Surinam, Chaucer to Aphra Behn, John Wiley & Sons.

Articles

  • Dickson, Vernon Guy, 2007. “Truth, Wonder, and Exemplarity in Aphra Behn's Oroonoko,” SEL Studies in English Literature 1500–1900, 47(3): 573–594.
  • Finger, Stanley, 2012. “The Lady and the Eel: how Aphra Behn introduced Europeans to the 'numb eel',” Perspectives in Biology and Medicine, 55(3):378–401.
  • Harol, Corrinne, 2012. “The Passion of Oroonoko: Passive Obedience, The Royal Slave, and Aphra Behn's Baroque Realism,” ELH, 79(2): 447–475.
  • Hughes, Derek, 2002. “Race, Gender, and Scholarly Practice: Aphra Behn's Oroonoko,” Essays in Criticism, 52(1): 1–22.
  • Molineux, Catherine, 2013. “False Gifts/Exotic Fictions: Epistemologies of Sovereignty and Assent in Aphra Behn's Oroonoko,” ELH, 80(2): 455–488.
  • Orr, Leah, 2013. “Attribution Problems in the Fiction of Aphra Behn,” Modern Language Review, 108(1): 30–51.
  • Pearson, Jacqueline, 1991. “Gender and Narrative in the Fiction of Aphra Behn,” The Review of English Studies, 42(165): 40–56.

Caroline of Ansbach

Articles

  • Brown, Gregory, 2004. “Personal, Political, and Philosophical Dimensions of the Leibniz-Caroline Correspondence,” in Leibniz and His Correspondents, Paul Lodge (ed.), Cambridge University Press. Retrived from http://www.myilibrary.com/?ID=47793
  • Meli, Bertoloni D, 1999. “Caroline, Liebniz, and Clarke,” Journal of the History of Ideas, 60(3): 469–486, University of Pennsylvania Press. Article Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org.proxy.lib.sfu.ca/stable/3654014

Margaret Cavendish

Books

  • Battigelli, Anna, 1998. Margaret Cavendish and The Exiles of the Mind, Lexington: The University Press of Kentucky.
  • Cavendish, Margaret, 2001. Observations on the Experimental Philosophy, Eileen O’Neill (ed.), New York/Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Cavendish, Margaret, 1992. Description of a new world, called the Blazing World, and other writings, Kate Lilley (ed.), New York: NYU Press.
  • Cavendish, Margaret, 2000. Paper Bodies, A Margaret Cavendish Reader, Sylvia Bowerblank and Sara Mendelson (eds.), Peterborough, ON: Broadview Press.
  • Cottegnies, Line, and Nancy Weitz (eds.), 2003. Authorial Conquests: Essays on Genre in the Writings of Margaret Cavendish, Fairleigh Dickinson.
  • Clucas, Stephen (ed.), 2003. A Princely Brave Woman: Essays on Margaret Cavendish, Duchess of Newcastle, Hampshire (England) and Burlington, VT: Ashgate Publishing Company.
  • James, Susan (ed.), Margaret Cavendish: Political Writings, Cambridge University Press.
  • O’Neill, Eileen, 2001. “Introduction.” in Margaret Cavendish: Observations upon Experimental Philosophy, Eileen O’Neill (ed.), Cambridge/NY: Cambridge University Press.
  • Rees, Emma LE, 2003. Margaret Cavendish, Manchester University Press.
  • Sarasohn, Lisa T, 2010. The Natural Philosophy of Margaret Cavendish: Reason and Fancy During the Scientific Revolution, Vol 2 , John Hopkins University Press.
  • Spalding-Andréolle, Donna and Véronique Molinari (eds.), 2011, Women and Science, 17th Century to Present: Pioneers, Activists and Protagonists, Newcastle upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars. [Chapter 2 is on d’Arconville, chapter 1 is on Margaret Cavendish and Anne Conway]
  • Whitaker, Katie, 2002. Mad Madge: The Extraordinary Life of Margaret Cavendish, Duchess of Newcastle, the First Woman to Live by Her Pen, New York: Basic Books.

Articles

  • Bonin, Erin Lang, 2000. “Margaret Cavendish's Dramatic Utopias and the Politics of Gender,” SEL Studies in English Literature 1500–1900, 40(2): 339–354.
  • Boyle, Deborah, 2006. “Fame, Virtue, and Government: Margaret Cavendish on Ethics and Politics,” Journal of the History of Ideas, 67(2): 251–289.
  • Boyle, Deborah, 2013. “Margaret Cavendish,” Philosophers' Magazine, 60 (1):63 - 65.
  • Boyle, Deborah, 2013. “Margaret Cavendish on Gender, Nature, and Freedom,” Hypatia, 28(3):516–532.
  • Broad, Jacqueline, 2007. “Margaret Cavendish and Joseph Glanvill: Science, Religion and Witchcraft,” Studies in the History and Philosophy of Science, 38: 493–505.
  • Broad, Jacqueline, 2011. “Is Margaret Cavendish Worthy of Study Today?” Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A, 42(3):457–461.
  • Clucas, Stephen, 1994. “The Atomism of the Cavendish Circle: A Reappraisal,” The Seventeenth Century, 9: 247–273.
  • Clucas, Stephen, 2000. “The Duchess and Viscountess: Negotiations between Mechanism and Vitalism in the Natural Philosophies of Margaret Cavendish and Anne Conway,” In-Between: Essays and Studies in Literary Criticism, 9(1): 125–36. [also listed under Anne Conway]
  • Clucas, Stephen, 2003. “Variation, Irregularity and Probabilism: Margaret Cavendish and Natural Philosophy as Rhetoric,” in A Princely Brave Woman: Essays on Margaret Cavendish, Duchess of Newcastle, Stephen Clucas (ed.), Hampshire (England) and Burlington, VT: Ashgate Publishing Company, 199–209.
  • Detlefsen, Karen, 2006. “Atomism, Monism, and Causation in the Natural Philosophy of Margaret Cavendish,” in Daniel Garber and Steven Nadler (eds.), Oxford Studies in Early Modern Philosophy, 3: 199–240.
  • Detlefsen, Karen, 2007. “Reason and Freedom: Margaret Cavendish on the Order and Disorder of Nature,” Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie, 89: 157–81.
  • Detlefsen, Karen, 2009. “Margaret Cavendish on the Relation between God and World,” Philosophy Compass, 4(3): 421–438.
  • Duncan, Stewart, 2012. “Debating Materialism: Cavendish, Hobbes, and More,” History of Philosophy Quarterly, 29(4):391–409.
  • Gregoriou, Zelia, 2013. “Pedagogy and Passages: The Performativity of Margaret Cavendish's Utopian Fiction,” Journal of Philosophy of Education.
  • Hutton, Sarah, 1996. “In Dialogue with Thomas Hobbes: Margaret Cavendish’s Natural Philosophy,” Women’s Writing, 4: 421–32.
  • Hutton, Sarah, 1997. “Anne Conway, Margaret Cavendish and Seventeenth-Century Scientific Thought,” in Women, Science, and Medicine 1500–1700, L. Hunter and S. Hutton (eds.), Stroud/Gloucestershire: Sutton Publishing. [Also listed under Anne Conway].
  • Hutton, Sarah, 2003. “Science and Satire: the Lucianic Voice of Margaret Cavendish’s Description of a New World Called the Blazing World,” In Authorial Conquests: Essays on Genre in the Writings of Margaret Cavendish, Line Cottegnies and Nancy Weitz (eds.), Madison: Fairleigh Dickinson University Press; London: Associated University Presses.
  • Ingram, Randall, 2000. “First Words and Second Thoughts: Margaret Cavendish, Humphrey Moseley, and 'the Book',” Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies, 30(1): 101–124.
  • James, Susan, 1999. “The Philosophical Innovations of Margaret Cavendish,” British Journal for the History of Philosophy, 7(2):219–244.
  • Lewis, Eric, 2001. “The Legacy of Margaret Cavendish,” Perspectives on Science, 9(3): 341–365.
  • Michaelian, Kourken, 2009. “Margaret Cavendish's Epistemology,” British Journal for the History of Philosophy, 17(1): 31–53.
  • Nate, Richard, 2001. “'Plain and Vulgarly Express'd': Margaret Cavendish and the Discourse of the New Science,” Rhetorica, 19(4): 403–417.
  • Sarasohn, Lisa T, 1984. “A Science Turned Upside Down: Feminism and the Natural Philosophy of Margaret Cavendish,” Huntington Library Quarterly, 47: 299–307.
  • Smith, Hilda, 1997. “'A general war amongst the men': Political differences between Margaret and William Cavendish,” in Politics and the Political Imagination in Later Stuart Britain: Essays presented to Lois Schwoerer, Howard Nenner (ed.), Rochester, NY.
  • Starr, G. Gabrielle, 2006. “Cavendish, Aesthetics, and the Anti-Platonic Line,” Eighteenth-century Studies, 39(3): 295–308.

Queen Christina of Sweden

Books

  • Akerman, Susanna, 1991. Queen Christina of Sweden and her circle: The transformation of a seventeenth-Century philosophical libertine, Leiden: E. J. Brill.
  • Buckley, Veronica, 2011. Christina Queen of Sweden: The Restless Life of a European Eccentric, UK: HarperCollins.
  • Christina of Sweden, 2010 (reprint of London 1753 translation). The Works of Christina, Queen of Sweden, Containing maxims and sentences, in twelve centuries: and reflections on the actions of Alexander the Great; first translation from the French, Farmington Hills, MI: Gale ECCO.
  • Rodén, Marie-Louise, 2000. Church Politics in Seventeenth-Century Rome: Cardinal Decio Azzolino, Queen Christina of Sweden and the Squadrone Volante, Stockholm: Almqvist & Wichsell.
  • Rodén, Marie-Louise, 1998. Queen Christina, Stockholm: Swedish Institute.

Articles

  • Ackerman, Susanna, 1991. “Kristina Wasa, Queen of Sweden,” in A History of Women Philosophers, Vol. 3, Mary Ellen Waithe (ed.), Dordrecht: Kluwer: 21–40.

Lady Mary Chudleigh

Books

  • Chudleigh, Lady Mary, 1993. The Poems and Prose of Mary, Lady Chudleigh, Oxford University Press.

Articles

  • Gilbert, Sandra M. and Susan Gubar, 1996. “Lady Mary Chudleigh.” The Norton Anthology of Literature by Women: The Traditions in English, New York: W.W. Norton. 161.

Anne Conway

Books

  • Conway, Anne Finch, 1996. The Principles of the Most Ancient and Modern Philosophy, Allison Coudert and Taylor Corse (eds.), Cambridge/New York: Cambridge University Press.
  • Hutton, Sarah, 2004. Anne Conway: A Woman Philosopher, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Nicolson, Marjorie Hope and Hutton, Sarah (eds.), 1992. The Conway Letters: The Correspondence of Anne, Viscountess Conway, Henry More, and their Friends, 1642–1684. Clarendon Press.
  • Spalding-Andréolle, Donna and Véronique Molinari (eds.), 2011. Women and Science, 17th Century to Present: Pioneers, Activists and Protagonists, Newcastle upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars. [Chapter 2 is on d’Arconville, chapter 1 is on Margaret Cavendish and Anne Conway]
  • White, Carol W, 2008. The Legacy of Anne Conway (1631–1679): Reverberations from a Mystical Naturalism, Albany: State University of New York Press.

Articles

  • Clucas, Stephen, 2000. “The Duchess and Viscountess: Negotiations between Mechanism and Vitalism in the Natural Philosophies of Margaret Cavendish and Anne Conway,” In-Between: Essays and Studies in Literary Criticism, 9(1): 125–36. [Also listed under Margaret Cavendish].
  • Coudert, Allison and Taylor Corse, 1996. “Introduction,” in The Principles of the Most Ancient and Modern Philosophy, by Anne Conway, A. Coudert and T. Corse (eds.), Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Derksen, Louise D, 1998. “Anne Conway’s Critique of Cartesian Dualism,” Paper presented at the Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy, Boston, Massachusetts, August 10–15.
  • Duran, Jane, 1989. “Anne Viscountess Conway: A Seventeenth Century Rationalist.” Hypatia, 4(1): 64–79.
  • Frankel, Lois, 1995. “Anne Finch, Viscountess Conway,” in A History of Women Philosophers: Modern Women Philosophers, vol. 3, 1600–1900, M. E. Waithe (ed.), Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers: 41–58.
  • Hutton, Sarah, 1997. “Anne Conway, Margaret Cavendish and Seventeenth-Century Scientific Thought,” in Women, Science, and Medicine 1500–1700, L. Hunter and S. Hutton (ed.), Stroud/Gloucestershire: Sutton Publishing. [also listed under Margaret Cavendish]
  • Lascano, Marcy P, 2013. “Anne Conway: Bodies in the Spiritual World,” Philosophy Compass, 8(4): 327–336.
  • Loptson, Peter, 1995. “Anne Conway, Henry More and their World,” Dialogue, 34(1): 139–146.
  • Martensen, Robert, 2008. “A Philosopher and her Headaches: The Tribulations of Anne Conway,” Philosophical Forum, 39(3): 315–326.
  • McRobert, Jennifer, 2000. “Anne Conway's Vitalism and Her Critique of Descartes,” International Philosophical Quarterly, 40(1): 21–35.
  • Mercer, Christia, 2012. “Knowledge and Suffering in Early Modern Philosophy: G.W. Leibniz and Anne Conway,” in Emotional Minds, Sabrina Ebbersmeyer (ed.), De Gruyter.
  • Merchant, Carolyn, 1979. “The Vitalism of Anne Conway: Its Impact on Leibniz’s Concepts of the Monad,” Journal of the History of Philosophy, 17: 255–269.
  • Popkin, Richard H, 1990. “The Spiritualist Cosmologies of Henry More and Anne Conway,” in Henry More (1614–1687): Tercentenary Studies, S. Hutton (ed.), Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers: 98–113.

Sor Juana de la Cruz

Books

  • Flynn, Gerard C, 1971. Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, New York: Twayne.
  • Merrim, Stephanie (ed.), 1991. Feminist Perspectives on Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, Detroit: Wayne State University Press.
  • Montross, Constance M, 1981. Virtue or Vice? Sor Juana's Use of Thomistic Thought, Washington DC: University Press of America.
  • Paz, Octavio, 1988. Sor Juana or, The Traps of Faith, Margaret Sayers Peden (trans.), Cambridge: Harvard University Press.
  • Tavard, George H, 1991. Juana Inés de la Cruz and the Theology of Beauty: The First Mexican Theology, Notre Dame, Ind.: University of Notre Dame Press.

Articles

  • Arenal, Electa, 1999. “Where Woman is Creator of the World; or Sor Juana’s Discourses on Method,” in Feminist Perspectives on Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, Stephanie Merrim (ed.) Detroit: Wayne State University Press.
  • Cortés-Vélez, Dinorah, 2010. “Marian Devotion and Religious Paradox in Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz,” Renascence, 62(3): 179–200.
  • Ludmer, Josefina, 1991. “The Tricks of the Weak.” In Feminist Perspectives on Sor Juana, Stephanie Merrim (ed.) Detroit: Wayne State University Press.
  • Mitsuda, Masato, 2002. “Chuang Tzu and sor Juana Ines de la Cruz: Eyes to Think, Ears to See,” Journal of Chinese Philosophy, 29(1): 119–133.
  • Morkovsky, Mary Christine, CDP, 1991. “Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz,” in A History of Women Philosophers, Mary Ellen Waithe (ed.) 4 vols, Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers.
  • Scott, Nina, 1985. “Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz: 'Let your Women Keep Silence in the Churches',” Women’s Studies International Forum, 8(5): 511–19.
  • Scott, Nina, 1988. “'If you are not pleased to favor me, put me out of your mind': Gender and Authority in Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz; and the Translation of Her Letter to the Reverend Father Maestro Antonio Núñez of the Society of Jesus,” Women’s Studies International Forum, 11(5): 429–38.

René Descartes and Cartesianism

See also Elisabeth, Princess of Bohemia

Books

  • Bordo, Susan (ed.) 1999. Feminist Interpretations of Rene Descartes, University Park: Pennsylvania University Press.
  • Bordo, Susan, 1987. The Flight to Objectivity: Essays on Cartesianism and Culture, Albany: SUNY Press.
  • Harth, E, 1992. Cartesian Women: Versions and Subversions of Rational Discourse in the Old Regime, Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press. [TOC identifies Elisabeth, du Chatelet, de Gouges.]
  • Scheman, Naomi, 1993. Engenderings: Constructions of Knowledge, Authority, and Privilege, New York: Routledge.

Articles

  • Amoros, Celia, 1994. “Cartesianism and Feminism: What Reason has Forgotten; Reasons for Forgetting,” Hypatia, 9(1): 147–163.
  • Atherton, Margaret, 1993. “Cartesian Reason and Gendered Reason,” in A Mind of One's Own: Feminist Essays on Reason and Objectivity, Louise Antony and Charlotte Witt (eds.), Boulder: Westview Press, 19–34.
  • Berman, Ruth, 1989. “From Aristotle's Dualism to Materialist Dialectics: Feminist Transformation of Science and Society,” in Gender/Body/Knowledge: Feminist Reconstructions ofBeing and Knowing, Alison M. Jaggar and Susan R. Bordo (eds.), New Brunswick: Rutgers University Press.
  • Bordo, Susan, 1986. “The Cartesian Masculinization of Thought,” Signs, 11: 439–456.
  • Bordo, Susan and Mario Moussa, 1999. “Rehabilitating the ‘I,’” in Feminist Interpretations of René Descartes, Susan Bordo (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania University Press.
  • Cantrell, Carol H., 1990. “Analogy as Destiny: Cartesian Man and the Woman Reader,” Hypatia, 5(2): 7–19.
  • Clarke, Stanley, 1999. “Descartes' ‘Gender,’” in Feminist Interpretations of René Descartes, Susan Bordo (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania University Press.
  • David, Anthony, 1997. “Le Doeuff and Irigaray on Descartes,” Philosophy Today, 41(3–4), 367–382.
  • Gatens, Moira, 1998. “Modern Rationalism,” in A Companion to Feminist Philosophy, Alison M. Jaggar (ed.), Cambridge: Blackwell.
  • Gertler, Brie, 2002. “Can Feminists Be Cartesians?” in Dialogue: Canadian Philosophical Review, 41(1): 91–112.
  • Harth, Erica, 1999. “Cartesian Women,” in Feminist Interpretations of René Descartes, Susan Bordo (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania University Press.
  • Heywood, Leslie, 1999. “When Descartes Met the Fitness Babe: Academic Cartesianism and the Late Twentieth-Century Cult of the Body,” in Feminist Interpretations of René Descartes, Susan Bordo (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania University Press.
  • Hodge, Joanna, 1998. “Subject, Body, and the Exclusion of Women from Philosophy,” in Feminist Perspectives in Philosophy, Morwenna Griffiths (ed.), Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 152–168.
  • Irigaray, Luce, 1999. “Wonder: A Reading of Descartes, ‘The Passions of the Soul,’” Carolyn Burke and Gillian C. Gill, (trans.), in Feminist Interpretations of René Descartes, Susan Bordo (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania University Press.
  • LaCaze, Marguerite, 2002. “The Encounter between Wonder and Generosity,” in Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy, 17(30: 1–19.
  • Lloyd, Genevieve, 1999. “Reason as Attainment,” in Feminist Interpretations of René Descartes, Susan Bordo (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania University Press.
  • O'Neill, Eileen, 1999. “Women Cartesians, ‘Feminine Philosophy,’ and Historical Exclusion,” in Feminist Interpretations of René Descartes, Susan Bordo (ed.) University Park: Pennsylvania University Press.
  • Paliyenko, Adrianna, 1999. “Postmodern Turns Against the Cartesian Subject: Descrtaes' ‘I’, Lacan's Other,” in Feminist Interpretations of René Descartes, Susan Bordo (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania University Press.
  • Perry, Ruth, 1999. “Radical Doubt and the Liberation of Women,” in Feminist Interpretations of René Descartes, Susan Bordo (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania University Press.
  • Saenz, Mario, 1999. “Cartesian Autobiography/Post-Cartesian Testimonials,” in Feminist Interpretations of René Descartes, Susan Bordo (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania University Press.
  • Stern, Karl, 1999. “Descartes,” in Feminist Interpretations of Rene Descartes, Susan Bordo (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania University Press.
  • Thompson, J., 1983. “Women and the High Priests of Reason,” Radical Philosophy, 34(Summer): 10–14.
  • Wartenberg, Thomas E., 1999. “Descartes's Mood: The Question of Feminism in the Correspondence with Elisabeth,” in Feminist Interpretations of René Descartes, Susan Bordo (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania University Press.
  • Watson, Richard A, 2009. “Feminist Interpretations of René Descartes,” International Studies in Philosophy, 35(1): 133–135.
  • Winders, James A., 1999. “Writing Like a Man (?): Descartes, Science, and Madness,” in Feminist Interpretations of René Descartes, Susan Bordo (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania University Press.
  • Wiseman, Mary Bittner, 1993. “Beautiful Exiles in Aesthetics,” in Aesthetics in Feminist Perspective, Hilde Hein (ed.), Bloomington: Indiana University Press.

Judith Drake

Books

  • Drake, Judith, 1970. An essay in defence of the female sex. In Letter to a Lady. Written by a Lady, London, 1696.

Articles

  • Smith, Hannah, 2001. “English ‘Feminist’ Writings and Judith Drake’s ‘An Essay in Defense of the Female Sex’ (1696),” The Historical Journal, 44(3): 727–747.

Jeanne Dumée

Books

  • Howard, Sethanne, 2012. The Hidden Giants, Washington Academy of Sciences, Third Edition. [This has only a very small entry on Dumee.]

Elisabeth, Princess of Bohemia

Books

  • Courtney, William Leonard, 1888. Studies new and old, London, Chapman and Hall. [Includes an entire chapter dedicated to Jacqueline Pascal, and another on Elisabeth and Descartes.]
  • Elisabeth, Princess of Bohemia, 2007. Correspondence between Princess Elisabeth of Bohemia and René Descartes, L. Shapiro (trans.), Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
  • Godfrey, Elizabeth (Jessie Bedford), 1909. A Sister of Prince Rupert, Elizabeth Princess Palatine and Abbess of Herford, London: John Lane the Bodley Head.
  • Nye, Andrea, 1999. The Princess and the Philosopher: Letters of Elisabeth of the Palatine to René Descartes, Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield.

Articles

  • Alanen, Lilli, 2004. “Descartes and Elisabeth: A Philosophical Dialogue?” in Feminist Reflections on the History of Philosophy, Lilli Alanen and Charlotte Witt (eds.), New York/Dordrecht: Kluwer, 193–218.
  • Garber, Daniel, 2001. “Understanding Interaction: What Descartes Should Have Told Elisabeth,” in Descartes Embodied: Reading Cartesian Philosophy through Cartesian Science, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 168–88.
  • Koch, Erec R, 2005. “Cartesian Aesth/Ethics: The Correspondence with Princess Elisabeth of Bohemia,” The Tulane Review, Spring/Summer: 10–15.
  • Lloyd, Genevieve, 2006. “Busy Lives: Descartes and Elisabeth on Time Management and the Philosophical Life,” Australian Feminist Studies, 21(51): 303–311.
  • Mattern, Ruth, 1978. “Descartes's Correspondence with Elizabeth: Concerning Both the Union and Distinction of Mind and Body,” in Descartes: Critical and Interpretative Essays, Michael Hooker (ed.), Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press.
  • Nye, Andrea, 1996. “Polity and Prudence: The Ethics of Elisabeth, Princess Palatine,” in Hypatia's Daughters: Fifteen Hundred Years of Women Philosophers, Linda Lopez McAlister (ed.), Bloomington: Indiana University Press.
  • Schmaltz, Tad. (forthcoming). “Princess Elisabeth of Bohemia on the Cartesian Mind: Interaction, Happiness, Freedom,” in Feminist History of Philosophy: The Recovery and Evaluation of Women's Philosophical Thought, E. O'Neill and M. Lascano (eds.), Dordrecht: Springer.
  • Shapiro, Lisa, 1999. “Princess Elisabeth and Descartes: The Union of Soul and Body and the Practice of Philosophy,” in British Journal for the History of Philosophy, 7(3): 503–520. Reprinted in Feminism and History of Philosophy, Genevieve Lloyd (ed.), New York: Oxford University Press, 2002, 182–203.
  • Sievert, Don, 2002. “Elizabeth and Descartes on the Possibility of Mind-Body Interaction,” Southwest Philosophy Review, 18: 149–54.
  • Tollefsen, Deborah, 1999. “Princess Elisabeth and the Problem of Mind-Body Interaction,” in Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy, 14(3): 59–77.
  • Wartenburg, Thomas, 1999. “Descartes's Mood: The Question of Feminism in the Correspondence with Elisabeth,” in Feminist Interpretations of René Descartes, Susan Bordo (ed.), University Park, PA: Pennsylvania State University Press.
  • Yandall, David, 1997. “What Descartes Really Told Elisabeth: Mind-Body Union as a Primitive Notion,” British Journal for the History of Philosophy, 5: 249–73.
  • Zedler, Bernice, 1989. “The Three Princesses.” Hypatia, 4(10: 28–63. [Also included under Sophie]

Margaret Fell Fox

Books

  • Bruyneel, Sally, 2010. Margaret Fell and the End of Time: The Theology of the Mother of Quakerism, Baylor University Press.
  • Glines, E. F. (ed.), 2003. Undaunted Zeal: The Letters of Margaret Fell, Richmond, IN: Friends United Press.
  • Kunze, B. Y., 1994. Margaret Fell and the Rise of Quakerism, New York: Macmillan.
  • Ross, I., 1996. Margaret Fell: Mother of Quakerism, third edition, York: The Ebor Press.
  • Wallace, T. S. (ed.), 1992. A Sincere and Constant Love: An Introduction to the Work of Margaret Fell, Richmond, IN: Friends United Press.

Articles

  • Donawerth, J, 2006. “Women's Reading Practices in Seventeenth-Century England: Margaret Fell's Women's Speaking Justified,” Sixteenth Century Journal: Journal of Early Modern Studies, 37(4): 985–1005.
  • Gardiner, J. K., 1994. “Margaret Fell Fox and Feminist Literary History: ‘A Mother in Israel’ Calls to the Jews,” Prose Studies, 17(3): 42–56.
  • Guibbory, A., 2000. “Conversation, Conversion, Messianic Redemption: Margaret Fell, Menasseh ben Israel, and the Jews,” in Literary Circles and Cultural Communities in Renaissance England, C. J. Summers and T.-L. Pebworth (eds.), Columbia and London: University of Missouri Press, 210–234.
  • Kunze, B. Y., 1988. “Religious Authority and Social Status in Seventeenth-Century England: The Friendship of Margaret Fell, George Fox, and William Penn,” Church History, 57(2): 170–86.
  • Leucke, M. S., 1997. “‘God Hath Made No Difference Such as Men Would’: Margaret Fell and the Politics of Women's Speech,” Bunyan Studies, 7: 73–95.
  • Thickstun, M. O., 1995. “Writing the Spirit: Margaret Fell's Feminist Critique of Pauline Theology,” Journal of the American Academy of Religion, 63(2): 269–79.

Marie de Gournay

Books

  • Butterworth, Emily, 2006. Poisoned Words: Slander and Satire in Early Modern France, London: Legenda. [There is a chapter dedicated to de Gournay on moral issues of slander.]
  • Clarke, Desmond M., 2013. The Equality of the Sexes: Three Feminist Texts of the Seventeenth Century, Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press. [Includes de Gournay, van Schurman, and Franҫoise Poulain de la Barre.]
  • Devincenzo, Giovanna, 2002. Marie de Gournay: Un cas littéraire, Fasano: Schena Editore/Paris: Presses de l’Université de Paris-Sorbonne.
  • Fogel, Michèle, 2004. Marie de Gournay: itinéraries d’une femme savante, Paris: Fayard.
  • Franchetti, Anna Lia, 2006. L’ombre discourante de Marie de Gournay, Paris: Honoré Champion Éditeur.
  • Gournay, Marie de., 1993. Égalité des hommes et des femmes, Grief des dames, suivi du Proumenoir de Monsieur de Montaigne, Texte établi, annoté et commenté par Constant Venesoen, Genève: Librairie Drozsa.
  • Gournay, Marie le Jars de., 1997–2002 [1641]. Les Advis, ou, les Presens de la Demoiselle de Gournay, 2 volumes, J. P. Beaulieu and H. Fournier (eds.), Amsterdam/Atlanta, GA.
  • Gournay, Marie le Jars de.,1998. Preface to the Essays of Montaigne, Richard Hollman and Colette Quesnel (eds. and trans.), Tempe, AZ: Medieval and Renaissance Texts and Studies.
  • Gournay, Marie le Jars de., 2002. Apology for the Woman Writing and Other Works, R. Hillman and C. Quesnel (eds. and trans.), Chicago: Chicago University Press.
  • Gournay, Marie le Jars de., 2002. Oeuvres complètes, Jean-Claude Arnould, Évelyne Berriot, Claude Blum, Anna Lia Franchetti, Marie-Claire Thomine and Valerie Worth-Stylianou (eds.), Paris: Champion.
  • Ilsley, Marjorie Henry, 1963. A Daughter of the Renaissance: Marie le Jars de Gournay, Her Life and Works, The Hague: Mouton.
  • Noiset, Marie-Thérèse, 2004. Marie de Gournay et son oeuvre, Jambes, Belgique: Les éditions namuroises.
  • Schiff, Mario, 1910. Marie de Gournay, Paris: Honoré Champion.

Articles

  • Bauschatz, Cathleen M., 1995. “Marie de Gournay’s Gendered Images for Language and Poetry,” Journal of Medieval and Renaissance Studies, 25: 489–500.
  • Bijvoet, Maya, 1989. “Marie de Gournay: Editor of Montaigne,” in Women Writers of the Seventeenth Century, Katharina M. Wilson and Frank J. Warnke (eds.), Athens/London: University of Georgia Press.
  • Cholakian, Patricia Francis, 1995. “The Economics of Friendship: Gournay’s Apologie pour celle qui escrit,” Journal of Medieval and Renaissance Studies, 25: 407–17.
  • Deslauriers, Marguerite, 2008. “One Soul in Two Bodies: Marie de Gournay and Montaigne,” Angelaki: Journal of the Theoretical Humanities, 13(2): 5–15.
  • Dotoli, Giovanni, 1997. “Montaigne et les libertins via Mlle de Gournay,” in Montaigne et Marie de Gournay: actes du Colloque international de Duke, réunis et présentés par Marcel Tetel, Paris: Honoré Champion Éditeur.
  • Lewis, Douglas, 1999. “Marie de Gournay and the Engendering of Equality,” Teaching Philosophy, 22(1): 53–76.
  • Mathieu-Castellani, Gisèle, 1997. “La quenouille ou la lyre: Marie de Gournay et la cause des femmes,” in Montaigne et Marie de Gournay: actes du Colloque international de Duke, réunis et présentés par Marcel Tetel, Paris: Honoré Champion Éditeur.
  • O'Neill, Eileen, 2011. “The Equality of Men and Women,” in The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy in Early Modern Europe, Desmond M. Clarke & Catherine Wilson (eds.), Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  • O'Neill, Eileen, 2007. “Justifying the Inclusion of Women in our Histories of Philosophy: The Case of Marie de Gournay,” in The Blackwell Guide to Feminist Philosophy, L. M. Alcoff and E. F. Kittay (eds.), Oxford: Blackwell.

Jeanne-Marie Guyon

Books

  • Guennin-Lelle, Dianne and Ronney Mourad, 2012. Jeanne Guyon: Selected Writings (Classics of Western Spirituality), Paulist Press.
  • Guyon, Jeanne-Marie Bouvier de la Motte, 2011. The Autobiography of Madam Guyon, Lost Angeles, USA: Indo-European Publishing.
  • Guyon, Jeanne-Marie Bouvier de la Motte, 2011. The Complete Madame Guyon, Nancy C. James (ed.), Paraclete Press.
  • Guyon, Jeanne-Marie Bouvier de la Motte, 2013. Letters of Jeanne Guyon, Whitaker House.
  • Mourad, Ronney and Dianne Guennin-Lelle, 2011. The Prison Narratives of Jeanne Guyon, USA: Oxford University Press.

Thomas Hobbes

Books

  • Hiaschmann, Nancy J. and Joanne H. Wright (eds.), 2012. Feminist Interpretations of Thomas Hobbes, University Park, PA: Pennsylvania State University Press.

Articles

  • Dalitz, Renée J., 1993. “The Subjection of Women in the Contractual Society,” in Empirical Logic and Public Debate, Erik C. W. Krabbe (ed.), Amsterdam: Rodopi.
  • Duran Forero, Rosalba, 2000. “Hobbes y Spinoza: Un contrapunto sobre la igualdad,” in Apuntes Filosoficos, 16: 9–19 (Spanish).
  • Green, Karen, 1994. “Christine de Pisan and Thomas Hobbes,” Philosophical Quarterly, 44(177): 456–475.
  • Stefano, Christine Di, 1983. “Masculinity as Ideology in Political Theory: Hobbesian Man Considered,” Women's Studies International Forum, 6(6).

Jane Lead[e]

Books

  • Juster, Susan, 2006. Doomsayers: Anglo-American Prophecy in the Age of Revolution, University of Pennsylvania Press. [See especially Chapter 3: Body and Soul: The Epistemology of Revelation.]
  • Lead, Jane, 1981 [1683]. The Revelation of Revelations, Edinburgh: Magnum Opus Hermetic Sourceworks.
  • Lead, Jane, 2010 [1696]. The Fountain of Gardens, Kessinger Publishing.
  • Hirst, Julie, 2005. Jane Leade: Biography of a Seventeenth-century Mystic, Ashgate Publishing.

Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz

Articles

  • Brown, Gregory, 2004. “Leibniz's Endgame and the Ladies of the Courts,” Journal of the History of Ideas, 65(1): 75–100.
  • Fara, Patricia, 2004. “Leibniz's women,” Endeavour, 28(4): 146–148. [Sophie, Sophie Charlotte, and Caroline.]
  • Gatens, Moira, 1998. “Modern Rationalism,” in A Companion to Feminist Philosophy, Alison M. Jaggar (ed.), Cambridge: Blackwell.

John Locke

Books

  • Beer, E. S., 1976. The Correspondence of John Locke, vol II - VI (of VIII), Oxford: Clarendon Press. [Excellent source for multiple correspondences with Lady Masham. Many correspondences with Lady Calverly, Martha Lockhard, Elisabeth Yonge, Martha Lockhart, Elizabeth Stratton, Elizabeth Berkeley (Burnet).]
  • Locke, John (1996/1693 and 1706). Some Thoughts Concerning Education and On the Conduct of the Understanding, Ruth Grant and Nathan Tarcov (eds.), Indianapolis: Hackett.

Articles

  • Butler, Melissa, 1978. “Early Political Roots of Feminism: John Locke and the Attack on Patriarchy,” American Political Science Review, 72. Reprinted in Nancy Tuana and Rosmarie Putnam Tong (eds.), 1995. Feminism and Philosophy: Essential Readings in Theory, Reinterpretation, and Application, Boulder: Westview Press.
  • Clark, Lorenne, 1979. “Women and Locke: Who Owns the Apples in the Garden of Eden?” in The Sexism of Social and Political Theory, L. Clark and L. Lange (eds.), Toronto: University of Toronto Press.
  • Simons, Martin, 1990. “Why Can't a Man Be More Like a Woman? (A Note on John Locke's Educational Thought),” Educational Theory, 40(1): 135–145.

Madame de Maintenon

Books

  • Dupré, L., 2004. The enlightenment and the intellectual foundations of modern culture, Yale University Press. [Discusses many aspects of the enlightenment, including many of the key male figures, as well as Madame de Maintenon and Guyon.]
  • de Maintenon, Madame, 2007. Dialogues and Addresses, John J. Conley (ed. and trans.), University of Chicago Press.

Articles

  • Gregoriou, Zelia, 1999. “Letter Writing and the Performativity of Intimacy in Female Pedagogical Relations: Recuperating Derridean Amnesia, Writing Back to Madame de Maintenon,” Studies in Philosophy and Education, 18(5): 351–363.
  • Leonard, John, 1947. “Madame de Maintenon and Saint-Cyr,” Studies: An Irish Quarterly Review, 36(144): 421–430. Article Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/30099736
  • Nyabongo, Virginia Simmons, 1949. “Madame de Maintenon and Her Contribution to Education,” The French Review, 22(3): 241–248.

Bathsua Makin

Books

  • Makin, Bathsua, 1993. An essay to revive the antient education of gentlewomen, No. 202. AMS Press.
  • Ratcliff, Melissa, 2004. The Influence of Bathsua Makin and Puritan Ideals on the Issue of Women's Education in Seventeenth and Eighteenth Century England, Diss. Eckerd College.
  • Teague, Frances N, 1998. Bathsua Makin: Woman of Learning, Bucknell Univ Press.
  • Westonia, Elizabetha Johanna, 2000. Neo-Latin Women Writers: Elizabeth Jane Weston and Bathsua Reginald [Makin], Ashgate.

Articles

  • Brink, Jean R., 1991. “Bathsua Reginald Makin: ‘Most Learned Matron,’” Huntington Library Quarterly, 54(4): 313–326.
  • Schillace, B. L., 2013. “Reproducing Custom: Mechanical Habits and Female Machines in Augustan Women's Education,” Feminist Formations, 25(1): 111–137.
  • Watts, R., 2005. “Gender, science and modernity in seventeenth‐century England,” Paedagogica historica, 41(1–2), 79–93. [Also discusses Cavendish, Conway, Hutchinson, van Schurmann.]

Lady Damaris Cudworth Masham

Books

  • Masham, Damaris Cudworth, n.d. Two letters to Shaftesbury, Public Record Office, London, MS 30/24/20 [part II], no. 106, ff. 266–7; and MS 30/24/20 [part II], no. 109, ff. 273–4.
  • Masham, Damaris Cudworth, 1696. A Discourse Concerning the Love of God, London.
  • Masham, Damaris Cudworth, 1705. Occasional Thoughts in Reference to a Vertuous or Christian Life, London.
  • Masham, Damaris Cudworth, 2005. Philosophical Works of Damaris, Lady Masham, J. Buickerood (ed.), London: Thoemmes Continuum.
  • Masham, Damaris and Le Clerc, n.d. Correspondence, Amsterdam University Library (UVA), MS J.58v; MS J.57.b; MS J.57.a; MS. J.57.c.
  • Masham, Damaris and Limborch, n.d. Correspondence, Amsterdam University Library (UVA), MS III.D.16, f. 215v; MS M.31.a; MS III.D.16, f. 53; MS M.31.b; MS III.D.16, f. 54; MS M.31.c; MS III.D.16, f. 55v-56.

Articles

  • Broad, Jacqueline, 2003. “Adversaries or Allies? Occasional Thoughts on the Masham-Astell Exchange,” Eighteenth-Century Thought, 1: 123–49.
  • Jacqueline Broad, 2006. “A Woman's Influence? John Locke and Damaris Masham on Moral Accountability,” Journal of the History of Ideas, 67(3): 489–510. Project MUSE. Web. 23 Sep. 2013. See Project MUSE.
  • Buickerood, James G., 2005. “What Is it With Damaris, Lady Masham? The Historiography of One Early Modern Woman Philosopher,” Locke Studies: An Annual Journal of Locke Research, 5: 179–214.
  • Frankel, Lois, 1989. “Damaris Cudworth Masham: A Seventeenth Century Feminist Philosopher,” Hypatia, 4: 80–90.
  • Hutton, Sarah, 1993. “Damaris Cudworth, Lady Masham: Between Platonism and Enlightenment,” British Journal for the History of Philosophy, 1(1): 29–54.
  • Moore, Terence, 2013. “John Locke and Damaris Masham, Née Cudworth: Questions of Influence,” Think, 12(34): 97–108.
  • Myers, Joanne E., 2013. “Enthusiastic Improvement: Mary Astell and Damaris Masham on Sociability,” Hypatia, 28 (3):533–550.
  • O'Donnell, Sheryl, 1984. “'My Idea in Your Mind': John Locke and Damaris Cudworth Masham,” in Mothering the Mind, Ruth Perry and Martine Watson Brownley (eds.), Holmes and Meier, 26–46.
  • Penaluna, Regan, 2007. “The Social and Political Thought of Damaris Cudworth Masham,” in Virtue, Liberty, and Toleration: Political Ideas of European Women, 1400–1800, Jacqueline Broad and Karen Green (eds.), Dordrecht: Springer, 111–22.
  • Phemister, Pauline, 2004. “The Principle of Uniformity in the Correspondence between Leibniz and Lady Masham,” in Leibniz and his Correspondence, Paul Lodge (ed.), Cambridge University Press. Retrieved from http://www.myilibrary.com/?ID=47793
  • Ready, Kathryn, 2002. “Damaris Cudworth Masham, Catharine Trotter Cockburn, and the Feminist Legacy of Locke's Theory of Personal Identity,” Eighteenth-Century Studies, 35(40: 563–576. [Also listed under Catharine Trotter Cockburn.]
  • Simonutti, Luisa, 1987. “Damaris Cudworth Masham: una Lady della Repubblica delle Lettere,” in Scritti in Onore di Eugenio Garin, Pisa: Scuola Normale Superioire, 141–65.
  • Weinberg, Sue, 1998. “Damaris Cudworth Masham: A Learned Lady of the Seventeenth Century,” in Norms and Values: Essays on the Work of Virginia Held, Joram Graf Haber and Mark S. Halfon (eds.), Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield.
  • Wilson, Catherine, 2004. “Love of God and Love of Creatures: The Masham-Astell Debate,” History of Philosophy Quarterly, 21(3): 281–98.

Esther Masham

Books

  • Masham, Esther, 1722. Letters from Relations & Friends to E. Masham Book 1, in The Newberry Library, Chicago, Case MS E5.M3827.

Articles

  • Whyman, Susan, John Locke, and Esther Masham, 2003. “The Correspondence of Esther Masham and John Locke: A Study in Epistolary Silences,” Huntington Library Quarterly, 66(3/4), Studies in the Cultural History of Letter Writing: 275–305

Sister Jacqueline Pascal

Books

  • Arnauld, Antoine and Felix Cadet, 1898. Port-Royal education: Saint Cyran; Arnauld; Lancelot; Nicóle; De Saci; Guyot; Coustel; Fontaine; Jacqueline Pascal, New York: Scribener’s.
  • Pascal, Jacqueline, 1854. Jacqueline Pascal; or, Convent life at Port Royal, H.N. (ed.), London: J Nisbit.
  • Pascal, Jacqueline, 2007. A rule for children and other writings, University of Chicago Press.
  • Weitzel, Sophie Winthrop, 1880. Sister and Saint: A Sketch of the Life of Jacqueline Pascal, No. 3733, ADF Randolph.
  • Woodgate, Mildred Violet, 1944. Jacqueline Pascal and her brother, Browne and Nolan limited.

Articles

  • Aries, Philippe, 1978. “Centuries of Childhood,” in Toward a New Sociology of Education, John Beck (ed.), Transaction Books.

Francois Poullain de la Barre, 1647–1723

Books

  • Clarke, Desmond M., 2013. The Equality of the Sexes: Three Feminist Texts of the Seventeenth Century, Oxford: Oxford University Press. [Includes de Gournay, van Schurman, and Franҫoise Poulain de la Barre.]
  • Poulain de la Barre, F., 2002, Three Cartesian Feminist Treatises, Vivien Bosley (trans.), Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
  • Seidel, Michael A., 1974. “Poullain de la Barre's ‘The Woman as Good as the Man’,” Journal of the History of Ideas, 35: 499–508.

Anna Maria van Schurman

Books

  • de Baar, Mirjam, 1986. Choosing the better part: Anna Maria van Schurman (1607–1678), Vol. 146. International Archives of the History of Ideas, Kluwer Academic Pub.
  • Clarke, Desmond M., 2013. The Equality of the Sexes: Three Feminist Texts of the Seventeenth Century, Oxford: Oxford University Press. [Includes de Gournay, van Schurman, and Franҫoise Poulain de la Barre.]
  • Schurman, Anna Maria van, 1998. Whether a Christian Woman Should Be Educated and Other Writings from her Intellectual Circle, Joyce Irwin (ed. and trans.), Chicago and London: University of Chicago Press.

Articles

  • Bloem, Jeanette, 2004. “The Shaping of a ‘Beautiful’ Soul: The Critical Life of Anna Maria van Schurman,” in Feminism and the Final Foucoult, Dianna Taylor and Karen Vintges (eds.), University of Illinois Press.
  • Bo, Karen Lee, 2008. “I wish to be nothing: the role of self-denial in the mystical theology of A. M. van Schurman,” in Women, Gender and Radical Religion in Early Modern Europe, Sylvia Brown (ed.), Leiden.
  • Clarke, Desmond M., 2013. “Anna Maria van Schurman and Women's Education,” in Revue philosophique de la France et de l'étranger, 3: 347–360.
  • Irwin, Joyce, 1991. “Anna Maria van Schurman and Antoinette Bourignon: contrasting examples of seventeenth-century pietism,” in Church History, 60(3): 301–15.

Madeleine de Scudéry

Books

  • Scudéry, Madeleine de, 1644. Les femmes illustres, ou Les harangues héroïques, 2 vols, Paris: Quiney et de Sercy.
  • Scudéry, Madeleine de, 1683. Conversations upon Several Subjects, 2 volumes, F. Spence (trans.) London.
  • Scudéry, Madeleine de, 2003. The Story of Sapho, Karen Newman (trans.), Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
  • Scudéry, Madeleine de, 2004. Selected Letters, Orations, and Rhetorical Dialogues, Jane Donawerth and Julie Strongson (trans. and eds.), Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Articles

  • Green, Karen, 2010. “The Amazons and Mademoiselle de Scudéry's Refashioning of Female Virtue,” in Expanding the Canon of Early Modern Women's Writing, P. Salzman (ed.), Newcastle upon Tyne, England: Cambridge Scholars, 150–167.
  • Green, Karen, 2009. “Madeleine de Scudéry on Love and the Emergence of the ‘Private Sphere,’” History of Political Thought, 30(2): 272–285.

Sophia of Hanover

Books

  • Duggan, J.N., 2010. Sophia of Hanover, From Winter Princess to Heiress of Great Britain, London: Peter Owen.
  • Leibniz, Gottfried Wilhelm, Sophie of Hanover, and Queen Sophie Charlotte, 2011. Leibniz and the Two Sophies: The Philosophical Correspondence, Lloyd Strickland (trans. and ed.), Toronto: CRRS Publications.
  • Van der Cruysse, Dirk, 1990. Sophie de Hanovre, Memoires et Lettres de Voyage, Paris: Fayard.

Articles

  • Strickland, Lloyd, 2009. “The Philosophy of Sophie, Electress of Hanover,” Hypatia, 24(2): 186–204.

Baruch Spinoza

Books

  • Gatens, Moira, and Genevieve Lloyd, 1999. Collective Imaginings: Spinoza, Past and Present, London and New York: Routledge.

Articles

  • Dale, Catherine Mary, 1999. “A Queer Supplement: Reading Spinoza after Grosz,” in Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy, 14(1): 1–22.
  • Gatens, Moira, 1998. “Modern Rationalism,” in A Companion to Feminist Philosophy, Alison M. Jaggar (ed.), Cambridge: Blackwell.
  • Gatens, Moira, 2000. “Feminism as Password: Rethinking the Possible with Spinoza and Deleuze,” in Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy, 15(2): 59–75.
  • James, Susan, 2000. “The Power of Spinoza: Feminist Conjunctions,” in Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy, 15(2): 40–58.
  • Rorty, Amelie Oksenberg, 2002. “Spinoza on the Pathos of Idolatrous Love and the Hilarity of True Love,” in Feminism and History of Philosophy, Genevieve Lloyd (ed.), New York: Oxford University Press, 204–224.
  • Yeomans, Chris, 2003. “Spinoza, Feminism, and Domestic Violence,” in Iyyun: The Jerusalem Philosophical Quarterly, 52(January): 57–74.

Gabrielle Suchon

Books

  • Suchon, Gabrielle, Stanton, Domna C., and Wilkin, Rebecca May, 2010. A Woman who Defends All the Persons of Her Sex: Selected Philosophical and Moral Writings, University of Chicago Press.

Articles

  • Desnain, Veronique, 2006. “Gabrielle Suchon's Neutralistes,” in Relations and Relationships in Seventeenth-Century French Literature, Jennifer Robin Perlmutter (ed.), Vol. 36, Gunter Narr Verlag.
  • Desnain, Veronique, 2009. “The Origins of la vie neutre: Nicolas Caussin's Influence on the Writings of Gabrielle Suchon,” French studies, 63(2), 148–160.
  • Le Doeuff, Michèle & Deutscher, Penelope, 2000. “Feminism Is Back in France: Or Is It?” Hypatia, 15(4): 243–255.
  • Schutte, A. J, 2010. “Gabrielle Suchon's Leaving the Convent,” Australian Journal of French Studies, 47(3): 304–306.

Eighteenth Century Philosophy

General

Books

  • Boros, Gábor, Herman De Dijn, and Martin Moors (eds.), 2007. The concept of love in 17th and 18th century philosophy, Leuven University Press. [Includes a chapter on the Masam-Astell exchange. Also included in the 17th Century Philosophers Section.]
  • Fronius, Helen, 2007. Women and Literature in the Goethe Era 1770–1820: Determined Dilettantes, Oxford University Press. [Includes an interesting section on Amalia Holst’s debates on women’s education.]
  • Gita, May, 1970. Madame Roland and the Age of Revolution, New York: Columbia University Press.
  • Godineau, D., 1998. The Women of Paris and Their French Revolution, Katherine Streip (trans.), Berkeley: University of California Press.
  • Heuer, J. N., 2005. The Family and the Nation: Gender and Citizenship in Revolutionary France, 1789–1830, Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press.
  • Huber, Marie, and Nathaniel Stacy, 1817. The State of Souls Separated from Their Bodies: Being an Epistolary Treatise, Wherein it is Proved, by a Variety of Arguments Deduced from the Holy Scriptures, the Punishments of the Wicked Will Not be Endless, and All Objections Against it Solved; to which is Prefixed a Large Introduction, Evincing the Same Truth, from the Principles of Natural Religion, Cooperstown, NY: I.W. Clark.
  • Huber, Marie, 1761. Letters Concerning the Religion Essential to Man: as it is distinct from what is merely an assession to it, Glasglow: Printed for Robert Urie.
  • Messbarger, Rebecca, 2002. The century of women: representations of women in eighteenth-century Italian public discourse, University of Toronto Press.
  • Messbarger, Rebecca Marie and Paula Findlen (eds.), 2005. The contest for knowledge: debates over women's learning in eighteenth-century Italy, University of Chicago Press. [Includes primary text material for Maria Gaetana Agnesi, Giuseppa Eleonora Barbapiccola, Diamante Medaglia Faini, and Aretafila Savini de' Rossi.]
  • O'Brien, Karen, 2009. Women and Enlightenment in Eighteenth-Century Britain, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • O'Neill, Eileen (ed.), 1998. Women Philosophers of the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries: A Collection of Primary Sources, Oxford University Press.
  • Reynolds, Sian, 2012. Marriage and Revolution: Monsieur and Madame Roland, Oxford University Press.
  • Roudinesco, É, 1991. Theroigne de Mericourt: A Melancholic Woman during the French Revolution, Martin Thom (trans.), London: Verso.
  • Scott, Anne, 2003. Hannah More: The First Victorian, Oxford University Press.
  • Shaw, William, 1802. The Life of Hannah More, with a Critical Review of Her Writings, T. Hurst.
  • Smith, Nicholas D, 2008. The Literary Manuscripts and Letters of Hannah More, Ashgate Publishing.
  • Sotiropoulos, Carol Strauss, 2007. Early feminists and the education debates: England, France, Germany, 1760–1810, Fairleigh Dickinson University Press. [Includes, among others, in chronological order: Sophie von La Roche, Catharine Macaulay, Mary Wollstonecraft, Amalia Holst, and Betty Gleim.]

Articles

  • Findlen, Paula, 2011. “Mio filosofo caro: Clelia Grillo Borromeo, Antonio Vallisneri, and the Nature of Philosophical Friendship,” in Calculations of Faith Clelia Grillo Borromeo Arese. Un salotto letterario settecentesco tra arte, scienza e politica, Dario Generali, Andrea Spiriti and Ezio Vaccari (eds.), Biblioteca dell’Edizione Nazionale delle Opere di Antonio Vallisneri, Florence.
  • Hermesdorf, Marcellal C., 2003. “Hannah More and Dominican Values,” New Blackfriars, 84(994): 554–570.
  • Macarthur, Elizabeth, 1997. “Between the republic of virtue and the republic of letters: Marie-Jeanne Roland practices Rousseau,” Yale French Studies, 92: 184–203.
  • Offen, Karen, 1990. “The New Sexual Politics of French Revolutionary Historiography,” French Historical Studies, 16(4): 909–922.
  • O'Neill, Eileen, 2005. “Early Modern Women Philosophers and the History of Philosophy,” in Hypatia, 20(3): 185–197. Article Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3811122 [Interesting overview that orients many of the women philosophers in a conceptual map.]
  • Popkin, Jeremy, 1985. “The Condorcet-Suard Correspondence,” Eighteenth-Century Studies, 18(4): 550–557. The John Hopkins University Press. Article Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org.proxy.lib.sfu.ca/stable/2739009
  • Sotiropoulos, Carol Strauss, 2004. “Scandal Writ Large in the Wake of the French Revolution: The Case of Amalia Holst,” in Women in German Yearbook: Feminist Studies in German Literature and Culture, 20: 98–121.
  • Walker, Lesley H, 2001. “Sweet and consoling virtue: The memoirs of Madame Roland,” Eighteenth-Century Studies, 34(3): 403–419.

Maria Gaetana de Agnesi

Books

  • Cupillari, Antonella, 2007. A Biography of Maria Gaetana Agnesi, an Eighteenth-Century Woman Mathematician, with Translations of Some of Her Work from Italian to English, Lewiston, NY: Edwin Mellen Press.
  • Mazzotti, Massimo, 2007. The World of Maria Gaetana Agnesi, Mathematician of God (Johns Hopkins Studies in the History of Mathematics), The Johns Hopkins University Press.
  • Messbarger, Rebecca Marie and Paula Findlen (eds.), 2005. The contest for knowledge: debates over women's learning in eighteenth-century Italy, University of Chicago Press.
  • Osen, Lynn, 1974. Women in Mathematics, Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press. [See especially 33–48.]. [Also listed under Sophie Germain.]

Articles

  • Cavazza, Marta, 2009. “Between Modesty and Spectacle: Women and Science in Eighteenth-Century Italy,” in Italy’s Eighteenth Century: Gender and Culture in the Age of the Grand Tour, Findlen, Paula, Roworth, Wendy Wassyng, Sama, Catherine (eds.), Stanford University Press, 275–302.
  • Findlen, Paula, 2011. “Calculations of Faith: Mathematics, Philosophy, and Sanctity in 18th-Century Italy (new work on Maria Gaetana Agnesi),” Historia Mathematica, 38(2): 248–291.
  • Mazzotti, Massimo, 2001. “Maria Gaetana Agnesi: Mathematics and the Making of the Catholic Enlightenment,” Isis, 92(4): 657–683.
  • Truesdell, C., 1989. “Maria Gaetana Agnesi,” Archive for History of Exact Sciences, 40(2): 113–142.
  • Giuli, Paola, 2009. “'Monsters of Talent': fame and reputation of women improvisers in Arcadia,” in Italy’s Eighteenth Century: Gender and Culture in the Age of the Grand Tour, Findlen, Paula, Roworth, Wendy Wassyng, Sama, Catherine (eds.), Stanford University Press, 303–330.

Marie Thiroux d'Arconville

Books

  • Schiebinger, Londa, 1991. The Mind Has No Sex? Women in the Origins of Modern Science, Harvard University Press. [See especially “Marie Thiroux d’Arconville: A ‘Sexist’ Anatomist” in Chapter 9: The Public Route Barred.]
  • Spalding-Andréolle, Donna and Véronique Molinari (eds.), 2011. Women and Science, 17th Century to Present: Pioneers, Activists and Protagonists, Newcastle upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars. [Chapter 2 is on d’Arconville, chapter 1 is on Margaret Cavendish and Anne Conway.]

Articles

  • Hayes, Julie Candler, 2010. “Friendship and the Female Moralist,” Studies in Eighteenth Century Culture, 39(1): 171–189. [also listed under Anne-Thérèse de Lambert].
  • Pieretti, Marie-Pascale, 2002. “Women Writers and Translation in Eighteenth-Century France,” The French Review, 75(3): 474–488. [also listed under du Chatelet and Anne Dacier.]

Giuseppa-Eleonora Barbapiccola

Books

  • Messbarger, Rebecca Marie and Paula Findlen (eds.), 2005. The Contest for Knowledge: Debates over Women's Learning in Eighteenth-Century Italy, University of Chicago Press. [see Chapter 1 and translator’s introduction to Chapter 1.]

Articles

  • Findlen, P., 1995. “Translating the new science: women and the circulation of knowledge in enlightenment Italy,” Configurations, 3(2): 167–206. [Includes discussion of Barbapiccola’s Italian translation of Descartes’ Principles.]
  • Giglioni, Guido, 2003. “Between Exclusion and Seclusion: The Precarious and Elusive Place of Women in Early-Modern Thought,” Configurations, 11(1): 111–122. [Barbapiccola is mentioned only briefly.]

Laura Bassi

Books

  • Frize, Monique, 2013. Laura Bassi and Science in 18th Century Europe: The Extraordinary Life and Role of Italy’s Pioneering Female Professor, Springer-Verlag Berlin An.

Articles

  • Cavazza, Marta, 2010. “Laura Bassi and Giuseppe Veratti: an electric couple during the Enlightenment,” Contributions to Science, 115–124.
  • Dacome, Lucia, 2006. “Waxworks and the Performance of Anatomy in Mid-18th-Century Italy,” Endeavour, 30(1): 29–35.
  • Findlen, Paula, 1993. “Science as a Career in Enlightenment Italy: The Strategies of Laura Bassi,” Isis, 84(3): 441–469.

Jeremy Bentham

Books

  • Campos-Boralevi, Lea, 1984. Bentham and the Oppressed, West: Berlin-De-Gruyter.

Articles

  • Williford, Miriram, 1975. “Bentham and the Rights of Women,” Journal of the History of Ideas, 36(January-March).

Bluestocking Women

[The Bluestockings were the group of women who visited Elisabeth Montagu’s salon.]

Books

  • Kelly, Jennifer (ed.), 1999. Bluestocking feminism: writings of the Bluestocking Circle, 1738–1785, Pickering & Chatto.
  • Montagu, Elizabeth, 2011. Elizabeth Montagu, the queen of the bluestockings: her correspondence from 1720 to 1761, Vol 1 and 2, Emily J. Climenson (ed.), Cambridge University Press.
  • Schellenberg, Betty A. (ed.), 2003. Reconsidering the Bluestockings, Huntington Library.

Articles

  • Brown, Hilary, 2002. “The Reception of the Bluestockings by Eighteenth-Century German Women Writers,” Women in German Yearbook, 111–132.
  • Guest, Harriet, 2002. “Bluestocking feminism,” Huntington Library Quarterly, 65(1/2): 59–80.
  • Chapone, Hester, 2010. Letters on the Improvement of the Mind, Addressed to a Lady, Kessinger Publishing.

Isabelle de Charriére

Books

  • Allison, Jenene J., 1995. Revealing Difference: The Fiction of Isabelle de Charrière, University of Delaware Press.
  • de Charriére, Isabelle, 2008. Correspondence, Electronic Enlightenment Project.
  • Letzter, Jacqueline, 1998. Intellectual Tacking: Questions of Education in the Works of Isabelle de Charrière, Vol. 145, Rodopi.
  • Letzter, Jacqueline, and Robert Adelson, 2001. Women Writing Opera, University of California Press.
  • Samsom, Jelka, 2005. Individuation and Attachment in the Works of Isabelle de Charrière: Jelka Samsom, Vol. 16, Peter Lang.

Articles

  • Fisch, Gina, 2005. “Charriere's Untimely Realism: Aesthetic Representation and Literary Pedagogy in Lettres de Lausanne and La Princesse de Cleves,” MLN, 119(5): 1058–1082.
  • Rooksby, Emma, 2005. “Moral Theory in the Fiction of Isabelle de Charrière: The Case of Three Women,” Hypatia, 20(1): 1–20.

Elizabeth Carter

Books

  • Carter, Elizabeth, 2005. Elizabeth Carter, 1717–1806: An Edition of Some Unpublished Letters, University of Delaware Press.
  • Pennington, M., 1809. Memoirs of the Life of Mrs. Elizabeth Carter, OC Greenleaf.

Articles

  • Hutton, Sarah, 2007. “Virtue, God and Stoicism in the thought of Elizabeth Carter and Catharine Macaulay,” in Virtue, Liberty and Toleration: Political Ideas of European Women 1400–1800, Jacqueline Broad and Karen Green (eds.), Dordrecht: Springer.
  • Wallace, Jennifer, 2003. “Confined and Exposed: Elizabeth Carter's Classical Translations,” Tulsa Studies in Women's Literature, 22(2): 315–334.

Emilie du Châtelet

Books

  • Allen, Lydia D., 1998. Physics, frivolity, and “Madame Pompon-Newton”: the Historical Reception of the Marquise du Châtelet from 1750–1966, University of Cincinnati: PhD dissertation.
  • Du Châtelet, Émilie, 1740. Institutions de physique, Paris: Prault fils.
  • Du Châtelet, Émilie, 2009. Selected Philosophical and Scientific Writings, Judith P. Zinsser (ed.), Isabelle Bour and Judith P. Zinsser (trans.), Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
  • Hagengruber, Ruth (ed), 2011. Émilie Du Châtelet: Between Leibniz and Newton, London: Springer.
  • Wade, I. O., 1947. Studies on Voltaire with Some Unpublished Papers of Madame du Châtelet, Princeton: Princeton University Press.
  • Wade, I. O., 1941. Voltaire and Madame du Châtelet: An Essay on the Intellectual Activity at Cirey, Princeton: Princeton University Press.
  • Zinsser, Judith P, 2006. La Dame d’Esprit: A Biography of The Marquise Du Châtelet, New York: Viking.
  • Zinsser, Judith P., and Julie Candler Hayes, 2006. Emilie Du Châtelet: Rewriting Enlightenment Philosophy and Science, Oxford: Voltaire Foundation.

Articles

  • Barber, William H, 1967. “Mme du Châtelet and Leibnizianism: the genesis of the Institutions de physique,” in The Age of Enlightenment: Studies Presented to Theodore Besterman, W.H. Barber, J.H. Brumfitt, R.A. Leigh, R. Shackelton, and S.S.B. Taylor (eds.), Edinburgh: University Court of the University of St. Andrews, 200–22.
  • Detlefsen, Karen, 2013. “Emilie du Châtelet between Leibniz and Newton,” British Journal for the History of Philosophy, 21(1): 207–209.
  • Detlefsen, Karen, (forthcoming). “Du Châtelet and Descartes on the Roles of Hypothesis and Metaphysics in Science,” in Feminism and the History of Philosophy, Eileen O'Neill and Marcy Lascano (eds.), Dordrecht: Springer Academic Press.
  • Fara, Patricia, 2004. “Emilie du Châtelet: the Genius without a Beard,” Physics world, 17(6): 14–15.
  • Hagengruber, Ruth, 2011. “Emilie Du Châtelet between Leibniz and Newton: The Transformation of Metaphysics,” in Émilie Du Châtelet: Between Leibniz and Newton, Ruth Hagengruber (ed.), London: Springer.
  • Hutton, Sarah, 2004. “Emilie Du Châtelet’s Institutions de Physique as a Document in the History of French Newtonianism,” Studies in the History and Philosophy of Science, 35: 515–531.
  • Hutton, Sarah, 2004. “Women, Science, and Newtonianism: Emilie Du Châtelet versus Francesco Algarotti,” in Newton and Newtonianism, J.E. Force and S. Hutton (eds.), Dordrecht: Kluwer Publishing, 183–203
  • Hutton, Sarah, 2011. “Between Newton and Leibniz: Emilie Du Châtelet and Samuel Clarke,” in Émilie Du Châtelet: Between Leibniz and Newton, Ruth Hagengruber (ed.), London: Springer.
  • Iltis, Carolyn, 1977. “Madame Du Châtelet’s Metaphysics and Mechanics,” Studies in the History of Philosophy of Science, 8(1): 29–48.
  • Janik, Linda Gardiner, 1982. “Searching for the Metaphysics of Science: the Structure and Composition of Madame Du Châtelet’s Institutions de Physique, 1737–1740,” Studies on Voltaire and the Eighteenth Century, 201: 85–113.
  • Lascano, Marcy P, 2011. “Emilie du Châtelet on the Existence and Nature of God: An Examination of Her Arguments in Light of Their Sources,” British Journal for the History of Philosophy, 19(4): 741–58.
  • Moriarty, Paul Veatch, 2006. “The Principle of Sufficient Reason in Du Châtelet’s Institutions,” in Émilie Du Châtelet: Rewriting Enlightenment Philosophy and Science, Judith P. Zinsser and Julie Candler Hayes (eds.), Oxford: Voltaire Foundation,203–225.
  • Pieretti, Marie-Pascale, 2002. “Women Writers and Translation in Eighteenth-Century France,” The French Review, 75(3): 474–488.
  • Suisky, Dieter, 2012. “Leonhard Euler and Emilie du Châtelet. On the Post-Newtonian Development of Mechanics,” Emilie du Châtelet between Leibniz and Newton, Springer Netherlands, 113–155.
  • Terrall, Mary, 1995. “Emilie du Châtelet and the Gendering of Science,” History of Science, 33: 283–310
  • Zinsser, Judith P., 2005. “The Many Representations of the Marquise Du Châtelet,” in Men, Women, and the Birthing of Modern Science, Judith P. Zinsser (ed.), DeKalb: Northern Illinois University Press, 48–67.

Catharine Trotter Cockburn

Books

  • Kelley, Anne, 2002. Catharine Trotter: an Early Modern Writer in the Vanguard of Feminism, Aldershot: Ashgate.
  • Sheridan, P., 2006. Catharine Trotter Cockburn: Philosophical Writings, Orchard Park, NY: Broadview Editions.

Articles

  • Backscheider, Paula R, 1995. “Stretching the Form: Catharine Trotter Cockburn and Other Failures,” Theatre Journal, 47(4): 443–458.
  • Bolton, Martha Brandt, 1996. “Some Aspects of the Philosophical Work of Catharine Trotter Cockburn,” in Hypatia's Daughters: Fifteen Hundred Years of Women Philosophers, Linda Lopez McAlister (ed.), Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 139–164.
  • Duran, Jane, 2013. “Early English Empiricism and the Work of Catharine Trotter Cockburn,” Metaphilosophy, 44(4): 485–495.
  • Ready, Kathryn, 2002. “Damaris Cudworth Masham, Catharine Trotter Cockburn, and the feminist legacy of locke's theory of personal identity,” Eighteenth-century studies, 35(4): 563–576.
  • Sheridan, Patricia, 2007. “Reflection, Nature, and Moral Law: The extent of Catharine Trotter Cockburn's Lockeanism in her Defence of Mr. Locke's Essay,” Hypatia, 22(3): 133–151.
  • Thomas, Emily 2013. “Catharine Cockburn on Substantival Space,” History of Philosophy Quarterly, 30(30): 195–214
  • Waithe, Mary Ellen, 1991. “Catharine Trotter Cockburn,” in Modern Women Philosophers, 1600–1900, Mary Ellen Waithe (ed.), Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers.
  • Waithe, Mary Ellen, 1991. “Catharine Trotter Cockburn,” A History of Women Philosophers, Springer Netherlands, 101–125.

Anne Dacier

Books

  • Dacier, Anne, 1715. Des causes de la corruption du gout, (public domain e-book).
  • Hayes, Julie Candler, 2002. “Of Meaning and Modernity: Anne Dacier and the Homer Debate,” in Strategic Rewriting, David Lee Rubin (ed.), Charlottesville, VA: Rookwood, 173–95.
  • Morton, Richard Everett, 2003. Examining Changes in the Eighteenth-Century French Translations of Homer's “Iliad” by Anne Dacier and Houdar de la Motte, E. Mellen Press.

Articles

  • Moore, Fabienne, 2000. “Homer Revisited: Anne Le Fèvre Dacier’s Preface to Her Prose Translation of the Iliad in Early Eighteenth-Century France,” Studies in the Literary Imagination, 33(2): 87–107.
  • Pieretti, Marie-Pascale, 2002. “Women Writers and Translation in Eighteenth-Century France,” The French Review, 75(3): 474–488.

Louise D'Epinay

Books

  • David, O., 2007. L'autobiographie de convenance de Madame d'Epinay: Ecrivain-philosophe des Lumières-Subversion idéologique et formelle de l'écriture de soi, Editions L'Harmattan.
  • Steegmuller, Francis, 1991. A Woman, a Man, and Two Kingdoms: the Story of Madame d'Épinay and the Abbé Galiani, Knopf.
  • Weinreb, Ruth Plaut, 1993. Eagle in a Gauze Cage: Louise d'Epinay, femme de lettres. Vol. 23, AMS Press.

Articles

  • Parker, Alice, 1981. “Louise d'Epinay's Account of Female Epistemology and Sexual Politic,” The French Review, 55(1): 43–51.
  • Trouille, Mary, 1996. “Sexual/Textual Politics in the Enlightenment: Diderot and D'Epinay Respond to Thomas's Essay on Women,” Journal for Eighteenth‐Century Studies, 19(1): 1–15.
  • Trouille, Mary, 1996. “La Femme Mal Mariee: Mme d'Epinay's Challenge to Julie and Emile,” Eighteenth-Century Life, 20(1): 42–66.

Louise-Marie Dupin

Books

  • Dupin, Louise-Marie Madeleine. 2008. Louise Marie Madeleine Correspondence, Oxford: Electronic Enlightenment Project.
  • Dupin, L. M. M. F. 1884. Le portefeuille de Madame Dupin, Dame de Chenonceaux: lettres et oeuvres inédites, Paris: Calmann-Lévy.

Articles

  • Hunter, Angela, 2009. “The Unfinished Work on Louise Marie-Madeleine Dupin's Unfinished Ouvrage sur les femmes,” Eighteenth-Century Studies, 43(1): 95–111.

Stephanie Félicité de Genlis

Books

  • Genlis, Stéphanie Félicité, 2007. Adelaide and Theodore, or Letters on Education (1783), Gillian Dow (ed.), London: Pickering & Chatto.

Articles

  • Baumgartner, Karin, 2011. “In Search of Literary Mothers Across the Rhine: the Influence of Genlis and Staël on the Writing of Helmina Von Chezy,” Women's Writing, 18(1): 50–67.
  • Cook, Malcolm, 2005. “Writing for Charity: Mme de Genlis and Thérésina,” Eighteenth-Century Fiction, 17(3): 537–550.
  • Dow, Gillian, 2012. “Stéphanie-Félicité de Genlis and the French historical novel in Romantic Britain,” Women's Writing, 19(3): 273–292.
  • Heuer, Imke, 2011. “Something in Mme de Genlis Stile: Georgiana, Duchess of Devonshire’s ‘Zillia’, Playwriting and Female Aristocratic Authorship,” Women's Writing, 18(1): 68–85.
  • Parfitt, Alexandra, 2013. “Far From the Whirlwind: Christian Ethics and the Classical Tradition in Genlis’ Pedagogy,” RELIEF-Revue électronique de littérature française, 7(1): 4–18.
  • Schaneman, Judith Clark, 2001. “Rewriting Adèle et Théodore: Connections Between Madame de Genlis and Ann Radcliffe,” Comparative Literature Studies, 38(1): 31–45.
  • Schroder, Anne L., 1999. “Going Public against the Academy in 1784: Mme de Genlis Speaks out on Gender Bias,” Eighteenth-Century Studies, 32(3): 376–382.
  • Still, Judith, 2000. “The Re-working of La Nouvelle Heloise in Genlis's Mademoiselle de Clermont,” French Studies Bulletin, 21(77): 7–11.
  • Walker, Lesley H, 2004. “Producing Feminine Virtue: Strategies of Terror in Writings by Madame de Genlis,” Tulsa Studies in Women's Literature, 23(2): 213–236.

Olympe de Gouges

Books

  • Cole, John R. and Gouges, Olympe de, 2011. Between the queen and the cabby: Olympe de Gouges' Rights of Women, Montreal: McGill Queen's University Press.
  • Moussett, Sophie, 2007. Women's Rights and The French Revolution: a Biography of Olympe de Gouges, Joy Poirel (trans.), New Brunswick, New Jersey: Transaction Publishers.
  • Sherman, Carol L, 2013. Reading Olympe de Gouges, New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan.

Articles

  • Brown, Gregory S., 2001. “The Self-Fashioning of Olympe de Gouges, 1784–89,” Eighteenth-Century Studies, 34(3): 383–401. DOI: 10.1353/ecs.2001.0019
  • de Gouges, Olympe, 1994. “Black Slavery, or the Happy Shipwreck,” in Translating Slavery; Gender and Race in French Women's Writing, 1783–1823, Maryann De Julio (trans.), Doris Kadish and Franҫoise Massardiare-Kenney (eds.), Kent, Ohio: Kent State University Press, 87–119.
  • de Gouges, Olympe, 1791. “Declaration of the Rights of Women,” in Women in Revolutionary Paris, 1789–1795, D. G. Levy, H. B. Applewhite, and M.D. Johnson (eds.), Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1980, 87–96; hosted at American Studies Program website, City University of New York.
  • Vanpée, Janie, 1999. “Performing Justice: The Trials of Olympe de Gouges,” Theatre Journal, 51(1): 47–65. Article Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25068623

Sophie de Grouchy

Books

  • de Grouchy, Sophie, 2008 [1830]. Letters on Sympathy (1798): A Critical Edition, Karin Brown (ed.), and James E. McClellan III (trans.), Collingdale, PA: DIANE Publishing Company.

Articles

  • Brookes, B., 1980. “The Feminism of Condorcet and Sophie de Grouchy,” Studies on Voltaire and the Eighteenth Century, 189: 297–362.
  • Dawson, D., 2004. “From Moral Philosophy to Public Policy: Sophie de Grouchy's Translation and Critique of Smith's Theory of Moral Sentiments,” in Scotland and France in the Enlightenment, D. Dawson and P. Morère (eds.), Lewisburg, Pa: Bucknell University Press.
  • Forget, E. L., 2001. “Cultivating Sympathy: Sophie Condorcet's Letters on sympathy,” Journal of the History of Economic Thought, 23(3): 319–337.

David Hume

Books

  • Baier, Annette, 1994. Moral Prejudices, Cambridge MA: Harvard University Press.
  • Jacobson, Anne Jaap (ed.), 2000. Feminist Interpretations of David Hume, University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.
  • Richards, Janet Radcliffe, 1980. The Sceptical Feminist: A Philosophical Inquiry, Boston: Routledge and K. Paul.

Articles

  • Baier, Annette C., 2000, “Hume: The Reflective Women's Epistemologist?” in Feminist Interpretations of David Hume, Anne Jaap Jacobson (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 19–38.
  • Baier, Annette 1993. “Hume, the Reflective Women's Epistemologist?,” in Antony and Witt, 35–48.
  • Baier, Annette C., 1987. “Hume, the Women's Moral Theorist,” in Women and Moral Theory, Eva Kittay and Diane T. Meyers (eds.), Totowa NJ: Rowman and Littlefield, 37–55. Reprinted in Feminism and History of Philosophy, Genevieve Lloyd (ed.), New York: Oxford University Press, 2002, 227–250.
  • Battersby, C.,1981. “An Enquiry Concerning the Humean Woman,” Philosophy, 56: 303–312.
  • Burns, S., 1976. “The Humean Female,” Dialogue, 15(3): 414–424.
  • Burns, S. and L. Marcil-Lacoste, 1997. “Hume on Women,” in The Sexism of Social and Political Theory, L. Clark and L. Lange (eds.), Toronto: University of Toronto Press.
  • Duran, Jane, 2004. “Hume on the Gentler Sex,” in Philosophia: Philosophical Quarterly of Israel, 31(3–4): 487–500.
  • Frasca-Spada, Marina, 2002. “David Hume and the She-Philosophers,” in Philosophical Books, 43(3): 221–226.
  • Guimaraes, Livia, 2004. “The Gallant and the Philosopher,” Hume Studies, 30(1): 127–147.
  • Gowans, Christopher W., 1996. “After Kant: Ventures in Morality Without Respect for Persons,” Social Theory and Practice, 22(1): 105–129.
  • Herdt, Jennifer A., 2000. “Superstition and the Timid Sex,” in Feminist Interpretations of David Hume, Anne Jaap Jacobson (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 283–307.
  • Hirshmann, Nancy J., 2000. “Sympathy, Empathy, and Obligation: A Feminist Rereading,” in Feminist Interpretations of David Hume, Anne Jaap Jacobson (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 174–193.
  • Hough, Sheridan, 2000. “Humean Androgynes and the Nature of ‘Nature,’” in Feminist Interpretations of David Hume, Anne Jaap Jacobson (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 218–238.
  • Jacobson, Anne Jaap, 2000. “Reconceptualizing Reasoning and Writing the Philosophical Canon: The Case of David Hume,” in Feminist Interpretations of David Hume, Anne Jaap Jacobson (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 60–84.
  • Jenkins, Joyce L. and Robert Shaver, 2000. “‘Mr. Hobbes Could Have Said No More,’” in Feminist Interpretations of David Hume, Anne Jaap Jacobson (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 137–155.
  • Kuflik, Arthur, 1998. “Hume on Justice to Animals, Indians, and Women,” Hume Studies, 24(1): 53–70.
  • Lloyd, Genevieve, 2000, “Hume on the Passion for Truth,” in Feminist Interpretations of David Hume, Anne Jaap Jacobson (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 39–59.
  • Marcil-Lacoste, L., 1976. “The Consistency of Hume's Position Concerning Women,” Dialogue, 15(3): 425–440.
  • Martinelli-Fernandez, Susan, 2000. “Social Re(Construction): A Humean Voice on Moral Education, Social Constructions, and Feminism,” in Feminist Interpretations of David Hume, Anne Jaap Jacobson (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 194–217.
  • Smuts, Aaron A., 2000. “The Metaphorics of Hume's Gendered Skepticism,” in Feminist Interpretations of David Hume, Anne Jaap Jacobson (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 85–106.
  • Swanton, Christine, 2000. “Compassion as a Virtue in Hume,” in Feminist Interpretations of David Hume, Anne Jaap Jacobson (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 156–173.
  • Taylor, Jacqueline, 2000. “Hume and the Reality of Value,” in Feminist Interpretations of David Hume, Anne Jaap Jacobson (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 107–136.
  • Temple, Kathryn, 2000. “‘Manly Composition’: Hume and the History of England,” in Feminist Interpretations of David Hume, Anne Jaap Jacobson (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 263–282.
  • Williams, Christopher, 2000. “False Delicacy,” in Feminist Interpretations of David Hume, Anne Jaap Jacobson (ed.), University Park, Pennsylvania State University Press, 239–262.

Immanuel Kant

Books

  • Baier, Annette, 1994. Moral Prejudices, Cambridge MA: Harvard University Press.
  • Herman, Barbara, 1993. The Practice of Moral Judgment, Cambridge MA and London: Harvard University Press.
  • Holland, Nancy, 1998. The Madwoman's Dream: The Concept of the Appropriate in Ethical Thought, University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.
  • Hutchings, Kimberly, 1996. Kant, Critique, and Politics, New York: Routledge.
  • Jauch, Ursula Pia, 1989. Immanuel Kant zur Geschlechterdifferenz: Aufklarerische Vorurteilskritik und burgerliche Geschlechtsvormundschaft, Vienna: Passagen (German).
  • Moscovici, Claudia, 1996. From Sex Objects to Sexual Subjects, New York: Routledge.
  • Schott, Robin May (ed.), 1997. Feminist Interpretations of Immanuel Kant, University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.
  • Schott, Robin May, 1988. Cognition and Eros: A Critique of the Kantian Paradigm, University Park, PA: Pennsylvania State Press.
  • Schott, Robin May, 1993. A Feminist Critique of the Kantian Paradigm, University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.

Articles

  • Baier, Annette C., 1997. “How Can Individuals Share Responsibility?” in Feminist Interpretations of Kant, Robin May Schott (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 297–318.
  • Baron, Marcia, 1997. “Kantian Ethics and Claims of Detachment,” in Feminist Interpretations of Immanuel Kant, Robin May Schott (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.
  • Blum, Lawrence, 1982. “Kant's and Hegel's Moral Rationalism: A Feminist Perspective,” Canadian Journal of Philosophy, 12(2): 287–302.
  • David-Menard, Monique, 1997. “Kant, the Law, and Desire,” Leslie Lykes de Halbert (trans.), in Feminist Interpretations of Immanuel Kant, Robin May Schott (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.
  • David-Menard, Monique, 2000. “Kant's An Essay on the Maladies of the Mind and Observations on the Feeling of the Beautiful and the Sublime,” in Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy, 15(4): 82–98.
  • Gangavane, Deepti, 2004. “Kant on Femininity,” in Indian Philosophical Quarterly: Journal of the Department of Philosophy—University of Poona, 31(1–4): 359–376.
  • Gould, Timothy, 1982. “Intensity and its Audiences: Notes Towards a Feminist Perspective,” Canadian Journal of Philosophy, 12: 287–302.
  • Gowans, Christopher W., 1996. “After Kant: Ventures in Morality Without Respect for Persons,” Social Theory and Practice, 22(1): 105–129.
  • Hall, Kin, 1997. “Sensus Communis and Violence: A Feminist Reading of Kant's ‘Critique of Judgment,’” in Feminist Interpretations of Immanuel Kant, Robin May Schott (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.
  • Heikes, Deborah K., 2001. “Can Kant's Dialectical Subject Solve the Bias Paradox?,” in Contemporary Philosophy, 23(1–2): 16–23.
  • Hermann, Barbara, 1995. “Ob es sich lohnen konnte, uber Kants Auffassungen von Sexualitat und Ehe nachzudenken?,” Deutsche Zeitschrift fur Philosophie, 43(6): 967–988 (German).
  • Herman, Barbara, 1991. “Agency, Attachment, and Difference,” in Ethics, 101: 775–797; Reprinted in Feminism and History of Philosophy, Genevieve Lloyd (ed.), New York: Oxford University Press, 2002, 251–277.
  • Heinrichs, Thomas, 1995. “Die Ehe als Ort gleichberechtigter Lust,” Kant Studien, 86(1): 41–53 (German).
  • Klinger, Cornelia, 1997. “The Concepts of the Sublime and the Beautiful in Kant and Lyotard,” in Feminist Interpretations of Kant, Robin May Schott (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 191–211.
  • Kneller, Jane, 1997. “The Aesthetic Dimension of Kantian Autonomy,” in Feminist Interpretations of Immanuel Kant, Robin May Schott (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.
  • Kneller, Jane, 1993. “Discipline and Silence: Women and Imagination in Kant's Theory of Taste,” in Aesthetics in Feminist Perspective, Hilde Hein (ed.), Bloomington: Indiana University Press.
  • Kofman, Sarah, 1997. “The Economy of Respect: Kant and Respect for Women,”, Nicola Fisher (trans.), in Feminist Interpretations of Kant, Robin May Schott (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 355–372.
  • LaCaze, Marguerite, 2005. “Love, that Indispensable Supplement: Irigaray and Kant on Love and Respect,” in Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy, 20(3): 92–114.
  • Lango, John W., 1998. “Does Kant's Ethics Ignore Relations Between Persons?,” in Norms and Values: Essays on the Work of Virginia Held, Joram Graf Haber (ed.), Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield.
  • Lintott, Sheila, 2003. “Sublime Hunger: A Consideration of Eating Disorders Beyond Beauty,” in Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy, 18(4): 65–86.
  • Mendus, Susan, 1987. “Kant: An Honest but Narrow-Minded Bourgeois?,” in Women in Western Political Philosophy, Ellen Kennedy and Susan Mendus (eds.), Brighton: Wheatsheaf Books.
  • Moen, Marcia, 1997. “Feminist Themes in Unlikely Places: Re-Reading Kant's ‘Critique of Judgment,’” in Feminist Interpretations of Immanuel Kant, Robin May Schott (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 1997.
  • Mosser, Kurt, 1999. “Kant and Feminism,” in Kant-Studien: Philosophische zeitschrift der Kant-Gesellschaft, 90(3): 322–353.
  • Moyer, Jeanna, 2001. “Why Kant and Ecofeminism Don't Mix,” in Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy, 16(3): 79–97.
  • Nagl-Docekal, Herta, 1997. “Feminist Ethics: How it Could Benefit from Kant's Moral Philosophy,” Stephanie Morgenstern (trans.), in Feminist Interpretations of Immanuel Kant, Robin May Schott (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.
  • Okin, Susan Moller, 1989. “Reason and Feeling in Thinking about Justice,” Ethics, 99: 229–249.
  • Piper, Adrian M.S., 1997. “Xenophobia and Kantian Rationalism,” in Feminist Interpretations of Kant, Robin May Schott (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 21–73.
  • Ross, Alison, 2000. “Introduction to Monique David-Menard on Kant and Madness,” in Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy, 15(4): 77–81.
  • Rumsey, Jean, 1997. “Re-Visions of Agency in Kant's Moral Theory,” in Feminist Interpretations of Immanuel Kant, Robin May Schott (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.
  • Schott, Robin May, 1998. “Feminism and Kant: Antipathy or Sympathy?,” in Autonomy and Community, Jane E. Kneller (ed.), Albany: SUNY Press.
  • Schott, Robin May, 1998. “Kant,” in A Companion to Feminist Philosophy, Alison M. Jaggar (ed.), Cambridge: Blackwell.
  • Schott, Robin May, 1997. “The Gender of Enlightenment,” in Feminist Interpretations of Kant, Robin May Schott (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 319–337.
  • Schroder, Hannelore, 1997. “Kant's Patriarchal Order,” Rita Gircour (trans.), in Feminist Interpretations of Immanuel Kant, Robin May Schott (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.
  • Sedgwick, Sally, 1990. “Can Kant's Ethics Survive the Feminist Critique?,” Pacific Philosophical Quarterly, 71(1): 60–79.
  • Uleman, Jennifer K., 2000. “On Kant, Infanticide, and Finding Oneself in a State of Nature,” in Zeitschrift fuer philosophische Forschung, 54(2): 173–195.
  • Villarmea, Stella, 2004. “En el corazon de la libertad: El universalismo kantiano desde una aproximacion de genero,” in Endoxa: Series Filosoficas, 18: 321–336
  • Wilson, Holly L., 1997. “Rethinking Kant from the Perspective of Ecofeminism,” in Feminist Interpretations of Immanuel Kant, Robin May Schott (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.
  • Wilson, Holyn, 1997. “Kant and Ecofeminism,” in Ecofeminism: Women, Culture, Nature, Karen J. Warren (ed.), Bloomington: Indiana University Press.
  • Wiseman, Mary Bittner, 1993. “Beautiful Exiles in Aesthetics,” in Aesthetics in Feminist Perspective, Hilde Hein (ed.), Bloomington: Indiana University Press.
  • Zweig, Arnulf, 1993. “Kant and the Family,” in Kindred Matters, Diana Tietjens Meyers (ed.), Ithaca: Cornell University Press.
  • Sapp, Vicki G., 1995. “The Philosopher's Seduction: Hume and the Fair Sex,” Philosophy and Literature, 19(1): 1–15.

Anne Therése, marquise de Lambert

Books

  • Hine, Ellen McNiven, 1973. Madame de Lambert, her Sources and her Circle, Oxford: The Voltaire Foundation.
  • Marquise de Anne Thérèse de Marguenat de Courcelles Lambert, 2014. Essays on Friendship and Old Age, HardPress Publishing.
  • Marquise de Anne Thérèse de Marguenat de Courcelles Lambert, 1737. The Philosophy of Love: or, New Reflexions on the Fair Sex, John Lockman (ed.), London: J Hawkins.
  • Marquise de Anne Thérèse de Marguenat de Courcelles Lambert, 1769. The Works of the Marchioness de Lambert, trans. anon. London: W. Owen.
  • Marquise de Anne Thérèse de Marguenat de Courcelles Lambert, 1790. The Fair Solitary, or Female Hermit, trans. anon. Philadelphia: (printed and sold by) William Spotswood.
  • Marquise de Anne Thérèse de Marguenat de Courcelles Lambert, 1995. New Reflections on Women: A New Translation and Introduction, Ellen McNiven Hine (ed.), New York: Peter Lang Publishing.

Articles

  • Beasely, Faith, 1992. “Anne-Thérèse de Lambert and the Politics of Taste,” Papers on French Seventeenth Century Literature, 19(37): 337–44.
  • Hayes, Julie Candler, 2010. “Friendship and the Female Moralist,” Studies in Eighteenth Century Culture, 39(1): 171–189.

Liberalism

Articles

  • Brennan, Theresa and Carole Pateman, 1968. “‘Mere Auxiliaries to the Commonwealth’: Women and the Origins of Liberalism,” Political Studies, XXVII(2).
  • Tapper, Marion, 1986. “Can a Feminist Be a Liberal?” Australasian Journal of Philosophy, Supp. 64.

Catharine Macaulay

Books

  • Davies, Kate, 2005. Catharine Macaulay and Mercy Otis Warren: the Revolutionary Atlantic and the Politics of Gender, Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  • Hill, Bridget, 1992. The Republican Virago: The Life and Times of Catharine Macaulay, Historian, Oxford: Clarendon Press.
  • Macaulay, Catherine Sawbridge, n.d. The History of England from the Accession of James I to the Brunswick Line, 8 vols. London, 1763–83.
  • Macaulay, Catherine Sawbridge, 1767. Loose Remarks on Certain Positions to be found in Mr. Hobbes’ ‘Philosophical Rudiments of Government and Society’, with a Short Sketch of a Democratic Form of Government, In a Letter to Signor Paoli, London.
  • Macaulay, Catherine Sawbridge, 1770. Observations on a Pamphlet entitled ‘Thoughts on the Cause of the Present Discontents,’ London.
  • Macaulay, Catherine Sawbridge, 1783. A Treatise on the Immutability of Moral Truth, London.
  • Macaulay, Catherine Sawbridge, 1790. Letters on Education with Observations on Religious and Metaphysical Subjects, Reprint, Yeadon: Woodstock Books, 1995.
  • Macaulay, Catherine Sawbridge, 1790. Observations on the Reflections of the Rt. Hon. Edmund Burke, on the Revolution in France, London.
  • Titone, Connie, 2004. Gender Equality in the Philosophy of Education: Catherine Macaulay's Forgotten Contribution, New York: Peter Lang.

Articles

  • Boos, F., 1976. “Catherine Macaulay's Letters on Education (1790): An Early Feminist Polemic,” University of Michigan Papers in Women's Studies, 2(2): 64–78.
  • Gardner, Catherine, 1998. “Catharine Macaulay's ‘Letters on Education’: Odd but Equal,” Hypatia, 13(1): 118–137.
  • Gardner, Catherine Villanueva, 2000. “Catherine Macaulay's Letters on Education: What Constitutes a Philosophical System,” in Rediscovering Women Philosophers: Philosophical Genre and the Boundaries of Philosophy, Boulder, Colorado: Westview Press.
  • Green, Karen, 2012. “Liberty and Virtue in Catherine Macaulay’s Enlightenment Philosophy,” Intellectual History Review (Special Issue: Women, Philosophy and Literature in the Early Modern Period), 22(3): 411–26.
  • Green, Karen, 2012. “When is a Contract Theorist Not A Contract Theorist? Mary Astell and Catherine Macaulay as Critics of Thomas Hobbes,” in Feminist Interpretations of Thomas Hobbes, Nancy J.Hiaschmann and Joanne H. Wright (eds.), University Park, PA: Pennsylvania State University Press, 169–189.
  • Green, K., & Weekes, S., 2013. “Catharine Macaulay on the Will,” History of European Ideas, 39(3): 409–425.
  • Gunther-Canada, Wendy, 2012. “Catherine Macaulay’s ‘Loose Remarks’ on Hobbesian Politics,” in Feminist Interpretations of Thomas Hobbes, Nancy J. Hiaschmann and Joanne H. Wright (eds.), University Park, PA: Pennsylvania State University Press, 190–215.
  • Gunther-Canada, W., 2003. “Cultivating virtue: Catharine Macaulay and Mary Wollstonecraft on civic education,” Women & Politics, 25(3): 47–70.
  • Hicks, Philip, 2002. “Catharine Macaulay's Civil War: Gender, history, and Republicanism in Georgian Britain,” Journal of British Studies, 41(2): 170–99.
  • Hutton, Sarah, 2005. “Liberty, Equality and God: The Religious Roots Catherine Macaulay’s Feminism,” in Women, Gender and Enlightenment, Barbara Taylor and Sarah Knott (eds.), Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.
  • Hutton, Sarah, 2007. “Virtue, God and Stoicism in the thought of Elizabeth Carter and Catharine Macaulay,” in Virtue, Liberty and Toleration: Political Ideas of European Women 1400–1800, Jacqueline Broad and Karen Green (eds.), Dordrecht: Springer.
  • O’Brien, Karen, 2005. “Catharine Macaulay’s Histories of England: A Female Perspective on the History of Liberty,” in Women, Gender and Enlightenment, Barbara Taylor and Sarah Knott (eds.), Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.
  • Pocock, J.G.A., 1998. “Catherine Macaulay: Patriot Historian,” in Women Writers and the Early Modern British Political Tradition, Hilda L. Smith (ed.), Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Reuter, Martina, 2007. “Macaulay and Wollstonecraft on the Will,” in Virtue, Liberty and Toleration: Political Ideas of European Women, 1400–1800, Jacqueline Broad and Karen Green (ed.), Dordrecht: Springer.
  • Wiseman, Susan, 2001. “Catharine Macaulay: history, republicanism and the public sphere,” in Women, Writing and the Public Sphere, 1700–1830, E. Eger, C. Grant, C. O Gallchoir and P. Warburton (eds.), Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Jean-Jacques Rousseau

Books

  • Lange, Lynda (ed.), 2002. Feminist Interpretations of Jean-Jacques Rousseau, University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.
  • Rousseau, Jean-Jacques, 1979[1762]. Emile, or On Education, Allan Bloom (trans.), New York: Basic Books.

Articles

  • Bloch, M. and J. H. Bloch, 1980. “Women and the Dialectics of Nature in Eighteenth Century French Thought,” in Nature, Culture, and Gender, C. MacCormack and M. Strathern (eds.), Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Bradshaw, Leah, 2002. “Rousseau on Civic Virtue, Male Autonomy, and the Construction of the Divided Female,” in Feminist Interpretations of Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Lynda Lange (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 65–88.
  • Butler, Melissa A., 2002. “Rousseau and the Politics of Care,” in Feminist Interpretations of Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Lynda Lange (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 212–228.
  • Canovan, Margaret, 1987. “Rousseau's Two Concepts of Citizenship,” in Women in Western Political Philosophy, Ellen Kennedy and Susan Mendus (eds.), Brighton: Wheatsheaf Books.
  • Deutscher, Penelope, 2002. “‘Is It Not Remarkable that Nietzsche…Should Have Hated Rousseau?’ Woman, Femininity: Distancing Nietzsche from Rousseau,” in Feminism and History of Philosophy, Genevieve Lloyd (ed.), New York: Oxford University Press, 322–347.
  • Gatens, Moira, 1986. “Rousseau and Wollstonecraft: Nature vs. Reason,” Australasian Journal of Philosophy, Supp. 64: 1–15.
  • Green, Karen, 1996. “Rousseau's Women,” International Journal of Philosophical Studies, 4(1): 87–109.
  • Holland, Nancy J., 1989. “Introduction to Kofman's ‘Rousseau's Phallocratic Ends,’” Hypatia, 3: 119–122.
  • Kofman, Sarah, 2002. “Rousseau's Phallocentric Ends,” Mara Dukats (trans.), in Feminist Interpretations of Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Lynda Lange (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 229–244.
  • Kula, Rebecca, 2002. “The Coupling of Human Souls: Rousseau and the Problem of Gender Relations,” in Feminist Interpretations of Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Lynda Lange (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 346–382.
  • Kuster, Friederike, 1999. “Sophie oder Julie? Paradigmen von weiblichkeit und Geschlechterordnung im werk Jean-Jacques Rousseaus,” in Deutsche Zeitschrift fuer Philosophie, 47(1): 13–33.
  • Lange, Lynda, 1981. “Rousseau and Modern Feminism,” Social Theory and Practice, 7: 245–277.
  • Lange, Lynda, 1979. “Rousseau: Women and the General Will,” in The Sexism of Social and Political Theory, L. Clark and L. Lange (eds.), Toronto: University of Toronto Press.
  • Letzter, Jacqueline and Robert Adelson, 2000. “French Women Opera Composers and the Aesthetics of Rousseau,” in Feminist Studies, 26(10: 69–100.
  • Lloyd, Genevieve, 1983. “Rousseau on Reason, Nature, and Women,” Metaphilosophy, 14(3 & 4).
  • Makus, Ingrid, 2002. “The Politics of ‘Feminine Concealment’ and ‘Masculine Openness’ in Rousseau,” in Feminist Interpretations of Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Lynda Lange (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 187–211.
  • Manning, Rita C., 2001. “Rousseau's Other Woman: Collette in Le Devin Du Village,” in Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy, 16(2): 27–42.
  • Marso, Lori J., 2002. “Rousseau's Subversive Women,” in Feminist Interpretations of Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Lynda Lange (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 245–276.
  • Marso, Lori Jo, 2005. “(Un)Manly Citizens: Jean-Jacques Rousseau's and Germaine de Stael's Subversive Women,” in Political Theory: An International Journal of Political Philosophy, 33(2).
  • Martin, J., 1981. “Sophie and Emile: A Case Study of Sex Bias in the History of Educational Thought,” Harvard Educational Review, 51(3): 357–371.
  • Morgenstern, Mira, 2002. “Women, Power, and the Politics of Everyday Life,” in Feminist Interpretations of Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Lynda Lange (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 113–143.
  • Okin, Susan Moller, 2002. “The Fate of Rousseau's Heroines,” in Feminist Interpretations of Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Lynda Lange (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 89–112.
  • Ormiston, Alice, 2002. “Developing a Feminist Concept of the Citizen: Rousseauian Insights on Nature and Reason,” in Feminist Interpretations of Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Lynda Lange (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 144–168.
  • Pateman, Carole, 1980. “’The Disorder of Women’: Women, Love, and the Sense of Justice,” Ethics, 91: 20–31.
  • Rapaport, Elizabeth, 1973–4. “On the Future of Love: Rousseau and the Radical Feminists,” The Philosophical Forum, 5(1–2): 185–205. Reprinted in Women and Philosophy: Toward a Theory of Liberation, Carol C. Gould and Marx W. Wartofsky (eds.), New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1976.
  • Sapiro, Virginia and Penny A. Weiss, 1996. “Jean-Jacques Rousseau and Mary Wollstonecraft: Restoring the Conversation,” in Feminist Interpretations of Mary Wollstonecraft, Maria J. Falco (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 179–208.
  • Thomas, Paul, 1991. “Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Sexist?,” Feminist Studies, 17(Summer): 195–218.
  • Weiss, Penny, 1990. “Rousseau's Political Defense of the Sex-Roled Family,” Hypatia, 5(3): 90–109.
  • Weiss, Penny A., 1996. “Wollstonecraft and Rousseau: The Gendered Face of Political Theorists,” in Feminist Interpretations of Mary Wollstonecraft, Maria J. Falco (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 15–32.
  • Weiss, Penny and Anne Harper, 2002. “Rousseau's Political Defense of the Sex-Roled Family,” in Feminist Interpretations of Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Lynda Lange (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 42–64.
  • Weistad, Else, 2002. “Empowerment Inside Patriarchy: Rousseau and the Masculine Construction of Femininity,” in Feminist Interpretations of Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Lynda Lange (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 169–186.
  • Wexler, Victor, 1976. “’Made for Man's Delight’: Rousseau as Anti-Feminist,” American Historical Review, 81(2).
  • Wingrove, Elizabeth, 2002. “Republican Romance,” in Feminist Interpretations of Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Lynda Lange (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 315–345.
  • Wingrove, Elizabeth Rose, 2002. “Rousseau's Republican Romance,” in Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy, 17(2).
  • Wittig, Monique, 2002. “On the Social Contract,” in Feminist Interpretations of Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Lynda Lange (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 383–392.
  • Zerilli, Linda, 2002. “‘Une Maitresse Imperieuse’: Women in Rousseau's Semiotic Republic,” in Feminist Interpretations of Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Lynda Lange (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 277–314.

Madame de Staël (Anne Louise Germaine Necker)

Books

  • Angelica Goodden, 2008. Madame de Staël: The Dangerous Exile, Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.
  • Fairweather, Maria, 2005. Madame de Staël, New York: Carroll & Graf.
  • Herold, J. Christopher, 2002. Mistress to an Age: A Life of Madame de Staël, New York: Grove Press.
  • de Staël, M., 1970. Madame de Staël et J.-B.-A. Suard: correspondance inédite (1786–1817) (Vol. 17), Geneva: Librairie Droz.
  • Winegarten, Renee, 2008. Germaine de Staël & Benjamin Constant: a Dual Biography, New Haven: Yale University Press.
  • Winegarten, Renee, 1985. Mme. de Staël, Dover, New Hampshire: Berg.

Articles

  • Higonnet, Margaret R., 1986. “Madame de Staël and Schelling,” Comparative Literature, 38(2): 159–180.
  • Marso, Lori J., 1998. “The Stories of Citizens: Rousseau, Montesquieu, and de Staël Challenge Enlightenment Reason,” Polity, 30(3): 435–463.
  • Martin, Judith E., 2002. “Nineteenth-Century German Literary Women's Reception of Madame de Staël,” Women in German Yearbook: 133–157.
  • Sluga, Glenda, 2003. “Gender and the nation: Madame de Staël or Italy,” Women's Writing, 10(2): 241–251.
  • Takeda, C., 2007. “Apology of Liberty in Lettres sur les ouvrages et le caractère de J.-J. Rousseau: Mme de Staël's Contribution to the Discourse on Natural Sociability,” European Review of History-Revue européenne d'Histoire, 14(2): 165–193.

Mary Wollstonecraft

Books

  • Anonymous, 1960 [1790]. A Vindication of the Rights of Men, in a Letter to the Right Honourable Edmund Burke, London: Joseph Johnson, November, 1790 anonymous; December, 1790 bearing Wollstonecraft's authorship, Eleanor Louise Nicholes (ed.), Gainesville, Florida: Scholar's Fascimilies & Reprints.
  • Botting, Eileen Hunt, 2006. Family Feuds: Wollstonecraft, Burke, and Rousseau on the Transformation of the Family, Albany, NY: The State University of New York Press.
  • Gunther-Canada,Wendy, 2001. Rebel Writer: Mary Wollstonecraft and Enlightenment Politics, DeKalb, Illinois: Northern Illinois University Press.
  • Falco, Maria J. (ed.), 1996. Feminist Interpretations of Mary Wollstonecraft, University Park: Pennsylvania University Press.
  • Sabrosky, Judith A., 1979. From Rationality to Liberation, Westport: Greenwood Press.
  • Taylor, Barbara, 2003. Mary Wollstonecraft and the Feminist Imagination, Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press.
  • Wollstonecraft, Mary, 1989. The Works of Mary Wollstonecraft, 7 volumes, J. Todd and M. Butler (eds.), Bloomington/Indianapolis: Indiana University Press.
  • Wollstonecraft, Mary, 1788. Original Stories from Real Life: with Conversations Calculated to Regulate the Affections and Form the Mind to Truth and Goodness, London: Joseph Johnson (with illustrations by William Blake).
  • Wollstonecraft, Mary, 1979 [1789]. The Female Reader: or Miscellaneous Pieces, in Prose and Verse: Selected from the Best Writers, and Disposed under Proper Heads: for the Improvement of Young Women, London: Joseph Johnson; Moira Ferguson (ed.), Delmar, New York: Scholar's Facsimiles.
  • Wollstonecraft, Mary, 1972 [1792]. A Vindication of the Rights of Woman with Strictures on Political and Moral Subjects, London: Joseph Johnson; Miriam Brody Kramnick (ed.), Harmondsworth: Penguin.
  • Wollstonecraft, Mary, 1993 [1794]. An Historical and Moral View of the Origin and Progress of the French Revolution; and the Effect it has produced in Europe, London: Joseph Johnson; Janet Todd (ed.) in Political Writings: A Vindication of the Rights of Men, A vindication of the Rights of Woman, An historical and Moral View of the French Revolution, London: Pickering; Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  • Wollstonecraft, Mary, 1976 [1796]. Letters Written during a Short Residence in Sweden, Norway, and Denmark, London: Joseph Johnson; Carol H. Poston (ed.), Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press.

Articles

  • Abbey, Ruth, 1999. “Back to the Future: Marriage as Friendship in the Thought of Mary Wollstonecraft,” Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy, 14(3): 78–95.
  • Barker-Benfield, G. J., 1989. “Mary Wollstonecraft: Eighteenth-Century Commonwealthwoman,” Journal of the History of Ideas, 50: 95–115.
  • Botting, Eileen Hunt, 2006. “Mary Wollstonecraft’s Enlightened Legacy: The Modern Social Imaginary; of the Egalitarian Family,” American Behavioral Scientist, 49(5): 687–701.
  • Botting, Eileen Hunt and Christine Carey, 2004. “Wollstonecraft’s Philosophical Impact on Nineteenth-Century American Women’s Rights Advocates,” American Journal of Political Science, 48(4): 707–722.
  • Brace, Laura, 2000. “‘Not Empire, but Equality’: Mary Wollstonecraft, the Marriage State and the Sexual Contract,” Journal of Political Philosophy, 8(4): 433–455.
  • Brody, Miriam, 1983. “Mary Wollstonecraft: Sexuality and Women's Rights,” in Feminist Theories, Dale Spender (ed.), London: The Women's Press.
  • Brody, Miriam, 1996. “The Vindication of the Writes of Women: Mary Wollstonecraft and Enlightenment Rhetoric,” in Feminist Interpretations of Mary Wollstonecraft, Maria J. Falco (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.
  • Coddetta, Carolina, 1995. “The Problem of Power in the Feminist Theory,” Fronesis, 2(2): 59–95 (Spanish).
  • Disch, Lisa, 1994. “Claire Loves Julie: Reading the Story of Women's Friendship in ‘La Nouvelle Heloise,’” Hypatia, 9(3): 19–45.
  • Duhan, Laura, 1990. “Feminism and Peace Theory: Women as Nurturers versus Women as Public Citizens,” in In the Interest of Peace: A Spectrum of Philosophical Views, Wolfeboro: Longwood.
  • Falco, Maria J., 1996. “Introduction: Who Was Mary Wollstonecraft?” in Feminist Interpretations of Mary Wollstonecraft, Maria J. Falco (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.
  • Ferguson, Moira, 1996. “Mary Wollstonecraft and the Problematic of Slavery,” in Feminist Interpretations of Mary Wollstonecraft, Maria J. Falco (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.
  • Gatens, Moira, 1986. “Rousseau and Wollstonecraft: Nature vs. Reason,” Australasian Journal of Philosophy (Supplement), 64: 1–15.
  • Grimshaw, Jean, 1989. “Mary Wollstonecraft and the Tensions in Feminist Philosophy,” Radical Philosophy, 52: 11–17.
  • Gubar, Susan, 1994. “Feminist Misogyny: Mary Wollstonecraft and the Paradox of ‘It Takes One to Know One,’” Feminist Studies, 20(3): 453–473.
  • Gunther-Canada, Wendy, 1996. “Mary Wollstonecraft's ‘Wild Wish’: Confounding Sex in the Discourse on Political Rights,” in Feminist Interpretations of Mary Wollstonecraft, Maria J. Falco (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press: 61–84.
  • Gunther-Canada, Wendy, 1996. “‘The Same Subject Continued’: Two Hundred Years of Wollstonecraft Scholarship,” in Feminist Interpretations of Mary Wollstonecraft, Maria J. Falco (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press: 209–224.
  • Heyes, Cressida, 2000. “Teaching Wollstonecraft's Maria, or the Wrongs of Woman,” in Teaching Philosophy, 23(2): 111–125.
  • Howard, Carol, 2004. “Wollstonecraft’s Thoughts on Slavery and Corruption,” The Eighteenth Century, 45(1): 61–86.
  • Janes, R. M., 1978. “On the Reception of Mary Wollstonecraft's ‘A Vindication of the Rights of Women,’” Journal of the History of Ideas, 39: 293–302.
  • Juengel, Scott, 2001. “Countenancing History: Mary Wollstonecraft, Samuel Stanhope Smith, and Enlightenment Racial Science,” English Literary History, 68(4): 897–927.
  • Korsmeyer, Carolyn, 1976, “Reason and Morals in the Early Feminist Movement: Mary Wollstonecraft,” Philosophical Forum (Boston), 5(1–2) (1973–1974). Reprinted in Women and Philosophy: Toward a Theory of Liberation, Carol C. Gould and Marx W. Wartofsky (eds.), New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons.
  • Larson, Elizabeth, 1992. “Mary Wollstonecraft and Women's Rights,” Free Inquiry, 12(2): 45–48.
  • Mackenzie, Catriona, 1996. “Reason and Sensibility: The Ideal of Women's Self-Governance in the Writings of M. Wollstonecraft,” in Hypatia's Daughters: Fifteen Hundred Years of Women Philosophers, Linda Lopez McAlister (ed.), Bloomington: Indiana University Press.
  • McCrystal, John, 1993. “Revolting Women: The Use of Revolutionary Discourse in Mary Astell and Mary Wollstonecraft Compared,” History of Political Thought, 14(2): 189–203.
  • Mellor, Anne K., 1997. “Sex, Violence, and Slavery: Blake and Wollstonecraft,” Huntington Library Quarterly, 58(3): 345–370.
  • Miller, Louise Byer, 1996. “Wollstonecraft, Gender Equality, and the Supreme Court,” in Feminist Interpretations of Mary Wollstonecraft, Maria J. Falco (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.
  • Muller, Virginia L., 1996. “What Can Liberals Learn from Mary Wollstonecraft?” in Feminist Interpretations of Mary Wollstonecraft, Maria J. Falco (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.
  • Nicholson, Mervyn, 1990. “The Eleventh Commandment: Sex and Spirit in Wollstonecraft and Malthus,” Journal of the History of Ideas, 51: 401–21.
  • Perreault, Jeanne, 2001. “Mary Wollstonecraft and Harriet Jacobs: Self Possessions,” in Mary Wollstonecraft and Mary Shelley: Writing Lives, Helen M. Buss and David Lorne Macdonald (eds.), Waterloo, ON: Wilfrid Laurier University Press.
  • Poston, Carol H., 1996. “Mary Wollstonecraft and ‘The Body Politic’,” in Feminist Interpretations of Mary Wollstonecraft, Maria J. Falco (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press: 85–104.
  • Reuter, Martina, 2007. “Macaulay and Wollstonecraft on the Will,” in Virtue, Liberty and Toleration: Political Ideas of European Women, 1400–1800, Jacqueline Broad and Karen Green (eds), Dordrecht: Springer.
  • Sapiro, Virginia, 1996. “Wollstonecraft, Feminism, and Democracy: ‘Being Bastilled’,” in Feminist Interpretations of Mary Wollstonecraft, Maria J. Falco (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.
  • Sapiro, Virginia and Penny A. Weiss, 1996. “Jean-Jacques Rousseau and Mary Wollstonecraft: Restoring the Conversation,” in Feminist Interpretations of Mary Wollstonecraft, Maria J. Falco (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.
  • Stetson, Dorothy McBride, 1996. “Women's Rights and Human Rights: Intersection and Conflict,” in Feminist Interpretations of Mary Wollstonecraft, Maria J. Falco (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.
  • Taylor, Barbara, 1999. “Misogyny and Feminism: The Case of Mary Wollstonecraft,” in Constellations: An International Journal of Critical and Democratic Theory, 6(4): 499–512.
  • Weiss, Penny A., 1996. “Wollstonecraft and Rousseau: The Gendered Face of Political Theorists,” in Feminist Interpretations of Mary Wollstonecraft, Maria J. Falco (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.
  • Wexler, Alice, 1981. “Mary Wollstonecraft, Her Tragic Life and Her Passionate Struggle for Freedom,” Feminist Studies, 7: 114–133.
  • Wingrove, Elizabeth, 2005. “Getting Intimate with Wollstonecraft: In the Republic of Letters,” in Political Theory: An International Journal of Political Philosophy, 33(3): 344–369.
  • Zaw, Susan Khin, 1998. “The Reasonable Heart: Mary Wollstonecraft's View of the Relation between Reason and Feeling in Morality, Moral Psychology, and Moral Development,” in Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy, 13(1): 78–117.

Nineteenth Century Philosophy

General

Books

  • Locke, Jill, and Eileen Hunt Botting (eds.), 2010. Feminist Interpretations of Alexis de Tocqueville, Pennsylvania: Penn State Press.

Charles Darwin

Books

  • Sayers, Janet, 1982. Biological Politics, London: Tavistock.

Articles

  • Deutscher, Penelope, 2004. “The Descent of Man and the Evolution of Woman,” in Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy, 19(2): 35–55.
  • Gates, Barbara T., 1994. “Revisioning Darwin, with Sympathy,” History of European Ideas, 19(4–6): 761–768.
  • Richards, Evelleen, 1983. “Darwin and the Descent of Women,” in The Wider Domain of Evolutionary Thought, David Oldroyd (ed.), Dordrecht: Reidel.

John Dewey

Books

  • Dewey, John, 1916. Democracy and Education, London: Macmillan.
  • Seigfried, Charlene Haddock (ed.), 2002. Feminist Interpretations of John Dewey, University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.

Articles

  • Addams, Jane, 2002. “A Toast to John Dewey,” in Feminist Interpretations of John Dewey, Charlene Haddock Seigfried (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.
  • Aleman, Ana M. Martinez, 2002. “Identity, Feminist Teaching, and John Dewey,” in Feminist Interpretations of John Dewey, Charlene Haddock Seigfried (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.
  • Boisvert, Raymond D., 1994. “Heteronomous Freedom,” in Philosophy and the Reconstruction of Culture, John Stuhr (ed.), Albany: SUNY Press.
  • Capps, John, 1997. “Pragmatism, Feminism, and the Sameness-Difference Debate,” Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society, 32(1): 39–54.
  • Clark, Ann, 1993. “The Quest for Certainty in Feminist Thought,” Hypatia, 8(3): 84–93.
  • Diller, Ann, 2003. “Dewey, Gilligan, and Gosselin on Learning Responsibility,” in Philosophy of Education Yearbook, 316–318.
  • Droege, Paula, 2002. “Reclaiming a Subject, or A View from Here,” in Feminist Interpretations of John Dewey, Charlene Haddock Seigfried (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.
  • Duhan, Laura, 1990. “Feminism and Peace Theory: Women as Nurturers versus Women as Public Citizens,” in In the Interest of Peace: A Spectrum of Philosophical Views, Wolfeboro: Longwood.
  • Duran, Jane, 2001. “A Holistically Deweyan Feminism,” in Metaphilosophy, 32(3): 279–292.
  • Fischer, Marilyn, 2002. “Jane Addams's Critique of Capitalism as Patriarchal,” in Feminist Interpretations of John Dewey, Charlene Haddock Seigfried (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.
  • Gatens-Robinson, Eugenie, 1991. “Dewey and the Feminist Successor Science Project,” Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society, 417–433.
  • Gatens-Robinson, Eugenie, 2002. “The Pragmatic Ecology of the Object: John Dewey and Donna Haraway on Objectivity,” in Feminist Interpretations of John Dewey, Charlene Haddock Seigfried (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.
  • Giarelli, James M., 1993. “Dewey and the Feminist Successor Pragmatism Project,” Free Inquiry, 13(1): 30–31.
  • Gosselin, Colette, 2003. “In a Different Voice and the Transformative Experience: A Deweyan Perspective,” in Educational Theory, 53(1): 91–105.
  • Green, Judith M., 2002. “Deepening Democratic Transformation: Deweyan Individuation and Pragmatist Feminism,” in Feminist Interpretations of John Dewey, Charlene Haddock Seigfried (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.
  • Hart, Carroll Guen, 1993. “‘Power in the Service of Love’: John Dewey's ‘Logic’ and the Dream of a Common Language,” Hypatia, 8(2): 1990–214.
  • Heldke, Lisa and Stephen Kellers, 1995. “Objectivity as Responsibility,” Metaphilosophy, 26(4): 360–378.
  • Heldke, Lisa, 2002. “How Practical Is John Dewey?” in Feminist Interpretations of John Dewey, Charlene Haddock Seigfried (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.
  • Lagemann, Ellen Condliffe, 2002. “Experimenting with Education: John Dewey and Ella Flagg Young at the University of Chicago,” in Feminist Interpretations of John Dewey, Charlene Haddock Seigfried (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.
  • Leach, Mary, 1995. “(Re)searching Dewey for Feminist Imaginaries: Linguistic Continuity, Discourse, and Gossip,” Studies in Philosophy and Education, 13(3–4): 291–306.
  • McKenna, Erin, 2002. “The Need for a Pragmatist Feminist Self,” in Feminist Interpretations of John Dewey, Charlene Haddock Seigfried (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.
  • Miller, Marjorie C., 2002. “Feminism and Pragmatism: On the Arrival of a ‘Ministry of Disturbance, a Regulated Source of Annoyance; a Destroyer of Routine, an Underminer of Complacency’,” in Feminist Interpretations of John Dewey, Charlene Haddock Seigfried (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.
  • Minnich, Elizabeth Kamarck, 2002. “Philosophy, Education, and the American Tradition of Aspirational Democracy,” in Feminist Interpretations of John Dewey, Charlene Haddock Seigfried (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.
  • Pappas, Gregory Fernando, 1993. “Dewey and Feminism: The Affective and Relationships in Dewey's Ethics,” Hypatia, 8(2): 78–95.
  • Pappas, Gregory Fernando, 2001. “Dewey and Latina Lesbians on the Quest for Purity,” in Journal of Speculative Philosophy: A Quarterly Journal of History, Criticism, and Imagination, 15(2): 152–161.
  • Rethorst, John C., 1991. “Myth and Morality,” Journal of Moral Education, 329–337.
  • Seigfried, Charlene Haddock, 1998. “John Dewey's Pragmatist Feminism,” in Reading Dewey, Larry A. Hickman (ed.), Bloomington: Indiana University Press.
  • Seigfried, Charlene Haddock, 1994. “Validating Women's Experience Pragmatically,” in Philosophy and the Reconstruction of Culture, John Stuhr (ed.), Albany: SUNY Press.
  • Seigfried, Charlene Haddock, 2000. “Feminist Ethics and the Sociality of Dewey's Moral Theory,” Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society: A Quarterly Journal in American Philosophy, 36(4): 529–534.
  • Seigfried, Charlene Haddock, 2002. “John Dewey's Pragmatist Feminism,” in Feminist Interpretations of John Dewey, Charlene Haddock Seigfried (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.
  • Seigfried, Charlene Haddock, 2002. “Introduction,” in Feminist Interpretations of John Dewey, Charlene Haddock Seigfried (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.
  • Sorrell, Kory Spencer, 1999. “Feminist Ethics and Dewey's Moral Theory,” Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society, 35(1): 89–114.
  • Sorrell, Kory Spencer, 1999. “Feminist Ethics and Dewey's Moral Theory,” Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society: A Quarterly Journal in American Philosophy, 35(1): 89–114.
  • Sullivan, Shannon, 1997. “Teaching as a Pragmatist: Relating Non-Foundational Theory and Classroom Practice,” Teaching Philosophy, 20(4): 401–419.
  • Sullivan, Shannon, 2002. “The Need for Truth: Toward a Pragmatist-Feminist Standpoint Theory,” in Feminist Interpretations of John Dewey, Charlene Haddock Seigfried (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.
  • Sullivan, Shannon, 2000. “Reconfiguring Gender with John Dewey: Habit, Bodies, and Cultural Change,” in Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy, 15(1): 23–42.
  • Upin, Jane, 1993. “Charlotte Perkins Gilman: Instrumentalism Beyond Dewey,” Hypatia, 8(2): 15–37.

Friedrich Engels

Books

  • Sayers, Janet, Mary Evans, and Nenneke Redclift (eds.), 1987. Engels Revisited: New Feminist Essays, London: Travistock.
  • Vogel, Lise, 1983. Marxism and the Oppression of Women: Toward a Unitary Theory, London: Pluto.

Articles

  • Carling, Alan, 1995. “Rational Choice Marxism and Postmodern Feminism: Towards a More Meaningful Incomprehension,” in Rational Choice Marxism, Terrell Carver (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.
  • Carvel, Terrel, 1985. “Engels' Feminism,” History of Political Thought, VI(3) (winter).
  • Dunayevskaya, Raya, 1984. “Marx's ‘New Humanism’ and the Dialectics of Women's Liberation in Primitive and Modern Societies,” Praxis International, 3: 369–381.
  • Haug, Frigga, 1996. “Entweder Geschlecht oder Arbeit—eine ratselhafte Disjunktion bei Engels,” in Das Argument: Zeitschrift fuer Philosophie und Sozialwissenschaften, 214(2): 239–245.

Sophie Germain

Books

  • Bucciarelli, Louis L. and Nancy Dworsky, 1980. Sophie Germain: An Essay in the History of the Theory of Elasticity, Dordrecht: Reidel.
  • Ornes, Stephen, 2008. Sophie Germain (Profiles in Mathematics), Morgan Reynolds Publishing.
  • Osen, Lynn, 1974. Women in Mathematics, Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press. [see especially pp 83–94]

Articles

  • Cipra, Barry, 2008. “A Woman Who Counted,” Science, 319(5865): 899–899.
  • Del Centina, Andrea, 2008. “Unpublished manuscripts of Sophie Germain and a revaluation of her work on Fermat’s Last Theorem,” Archive for history of exact sciences, 62(4): 349–392.
  • Del Centina, Andrea and Alessandra Fiocca, 2012. “The correspondence between Sophie Germain and Carl Friedrich Gauss,” Archive for history of exact sciences, 66(6): 585–700.
  • Del Centina, Andrea, 2005. “Letters of Sophie Germain preserved in Florence,” Historia Mathematica, 32(1): 60–75.
  • Gray, Mary W, 2005. “Sophie Germain,” in Complexities: Women in Mathematics, Bettye Anne Case and Anne M. Leggett (eds.), United Kingdom: Princeton University Press.
  • Mackinnon, Nick, 1990. “Sophie Germain: or was Gauss a feminist?” The Mathematical Gazette, 74(470): 346–351.
  • McGill, Sara Ann, 2000. “Sophie Germain,” in History Remembers Scientists of the Past: 9.
  • Moncrief, J. William, 2002. “Germain, Sophie,” in Mathematics Vol. 2, Barry Max Brandenberger Jr. (ed.), New York: Macmillan Reference USA.
  • Petrovich, Vesna Crnjanski, 1999. “Women and the Paris Academy of Sciences,” Eighteenth-Century Studies, 32(3): 383–391.
  • Sampson, J H., 1990–91. “Sophie Germain and the Theory of Numbers,” Archive for History of Exact Science, 41: 157–161.
  • Truesdell, C, 1991. “Sophie Germain : fame earned by stubborn error,” Bolletino di Storia delle Scienze Matematiche, 11(2): 3–24.

Mary Hays

Books

  • Hays, Mary and Marilyn L. Brooks, 2000. Memoirs of Emma Courtney, (Broadview Literary Texts), Peterborough, Ontario: Broadview Press.
  • Hays, Mary, 2005. The Idea of Being Free: A Mary Hays Reader, Gina Luria Walker (ed.), Toronto, Ontario: Broadview Press.
  • Walker, Gina Luria, 2006. Mary Hays, (1759 - 1843): The growth of a woman's mind, Burlington, VT: Ashgate.

Articles

  • Purdie, Susan and Sarah Oliver, 2010. “William Frend and Mary Hays: Victims of Prejudice,” Women's Writing, 17(1): 93–110.
  • Ward, Ian, 2009. “The Prejudices of Mary Hays,” International Journal of Law in Context, 5(2): 131–146. DOI: http://dx.doi.org.proxy.lib.sfu.ca/10.1017/ S1744552309990048

William James

Articles

  • Radin, Margaret Jane, 1991. “The Pragmatist and the Feminist,” in Pragmatism in Law and Society, Michael Brint (ed.), Boulder: Westview Press.

Marx and Marxism

Books

  • Aronson, Ronald, 1994. After Marxism, New York: Guilford.
  • Barrett, Michele. 1980. Women's Oppression Today, London: Redwood Burn LTD.
  • Carver, Terrell and Paul Thomas (eds.), 1995. Rational Choice Marxism, University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.
  • Cooke, Brett, George E. Slusser, and Jaume Marti-Olivella (eds.), 1998. The Fantastic Other: An Interface of Perspectives, Amsterdam: Rodopi.
  • Dunayevskaya, Raya, 2003. Philosophy and Revolution: From Hegel to Sartre, and from Marx to Mao, Lanham MD: Lexington Books.
  • Dunayevskaya, Raya, 2002. The Power of Negativity: Selected Writings on the Dialectic in Hegel and Marx, Kevin B. Anderson and Peter Hudis (eds), New York: Lexington Books.
  • Ferguson, Kathy E., 1980. Self, Society, and Womankind: The Dialectic of Liberation, Wesport: Greenwood Press.
  • Gamble, Andrew, David Marsh, and Tony Tant (eds.), 1999. Marxism and Social Science, Urbana-Champaign: University of Illinois Press.
  • Gottlieb, Roger D. (ed.), 1989. An Anthology of Western Marxism, New York: Oxford University Press.
  • Hartsock, Nancy C. M., 1983. Money, Sex, and Power: Toward a Feminist Historical Materialism, New York: Longman.
  • Hartsock, Nancy C.M., 1998. The Feminist Standpoint Revisited and Other Essays, Boulder: Westview Press.
  • Kain, Philip J., 1993. Marx and Modern Political Theory, Lanham: Rowman and Littlefield, Chapter 7.
  • Messerschmidt, James W., 1986. Capitalism, Patriarchy, and Crime: Toward a Socialist Feminist Criminology, Totowa: Rowman & Littlefield.
  • Nordquist, Joan, 2000. Social Theory: A Bibliographic Series, No. 56—Marxism and Ecology: A Bibliography, Santa Cruz: Reference & Research.
  • Sayers, Janet, 1982. Biological Politics, London: Tavistock.
  • Stevernagel, Gertrude A., 1979. Political Philosophy as Therapy: Marcuse Reconsidered, Westport: Greenwood.
  • Vogel, Lise, 1983. Marxism and the Oppression of Women: Toward a Unitary Theory, London: Pluto.

Articles

  • Alfaro Molina, Rocio, 2002. “Algunos aportes feministas a la teoria del estado,” in Revista de Filosofia de la Universidad de Costa Rica, 40(100): 119–123.
  • Aveling, Eleanor Marx and Edward Aveling, 1886. “The Woman Question: From a Socialist Point of View,” Westminster Review, 125.
  • Bologh, Roslyn Wallach, 1987. “Marx, Weber, and Masculine Theorizing: A Feminist Analysis,” in The Marx-Weber Debate, Norbert Wiley (ed.), Newbury Park: Sage.
  • Brod, Harry, 1988. “Pornography and the Alienation of Male Sexuality,” Social Theory and Practice, 14: 265–284.
  • Cocks, Joan, 1990. “Cultural Theory Looks at Identity and Contradiction,” Quest, 38–60.
  • Dickenson, Donna L., 2001. “Property and Women's Alienation from Their Own Reproductive Labor,” in Bioethics, 15(3): 205–217.
  • Dunayevskaya, Raya, 1984. “Marx's ‘New Humanism’ and the Dialectics of Women's Liberation in Primitive and Modern Societies,” Praxis International, 3(4).
  • Garcia Estebanez, Emilio, 2002. “Etica y sociologia en Estudioes Filosoficos,” in Estudioes Filosoficos, 51(148): 479–487.
  • Gimenez, Martha E., 2000. “What's Material about Materialist Feminism?: A Marxist Feminist Critique,” in Radical Philosophy: A Journal of Socialist and Feminist Philosophy, 101(May-June): 18–28.
  • Glass, Marvin and Ernie Thompson, 1994. “Reproduction for Money: Marxist Feminism and Surrogate Motherhood,” Nature, Society, and Thought, 7(3): 281–297.
  • Golat, Kelly F., 2003. “The Question of Equality: Mainstream Feminism Misses the Marxist Point,” in Dialogue: Journal of Phi Sigma Tau, 43(2–3): 34–38.
  • Goldstein, Leslie, 1980. “Mill, Marx, and Women's Liberation,” Journal of the History of Philosophy. XVIII(3) (July).
  • Hartsock, Nancy C. M., 1995. “The Feminist Standpoint: Developing the Ground for a Specifically Feminist Historical Materialism,” in Feminism and Philosophy: Essential Readings in Theory, Reinterpretation, and Application, Boulder: Westview Press.
  • Held, Virginia, 1976. “Marx, Sex, and the Transformation of Society,” The Philosophical Forum, 5(1–2) (1973–1974), 168–184; Reprinted in Women and Philosophy: Toward a Theory of Liberation, Carol C. Gould and Marx W. Wartofsky (eds.), New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons.
  • Henderson, Janet, 1989. “An Eco-Feminist Critique of Marx,” Dialogue (PST), 31: 58–64.
  • Jackson, Stevi, 1999. “Marxism and Feminism,” in Marxism and Social Science, Andrew Gamble, David Marsh, and Tony Tant (eds.), Urbana-Champaign: University of Illinois Press.
  • Jaggar, Alison, 1984. “Human Biology in Feminist Theory: Sexual Equality Reconsidered,” in Beyond Domination, Carol C. Gould (ed.), Totowa: Rowman & Allanheld.
  • Jones, Kathleen B., 1988. “Socialist-Feminist Theories of the Family,” Praxis International, 8: 284–300.
  • Kain, Philip J., 1993. “Marx, Housework, and Alienation,” Hypatia, 8(1): 121–144.
  • Kain, Philip J., 1992. “Modern Feminism and Marx,” Studies in Soviet Thought, 44(3): 159–192. (German)
  • Knapp, Gudrun-Axeli, 1999. “Flaschenpost und Tomate: Anmerkungen zur Frage einer Kritischen Theorie der Gegenwart,” in Zeitschrift fuer Kritische Theorie, 9: 103–119.
  • Marcuse, Herbert, 1974. “Marxism and Feminism,” Women's Studies, 2(3): 279–288.
  • Nicholson, Linda, 1986. “Feminism and Marx: Integrating Kinship with the Economic,” Praxis International, 5: 367–380.
  • O'Brien, Mary, 1995. “Reproducing Marxist Man,” in Feminism and Philosophy: Essential Readings in Theory, Reinterpretation, and Application, Boulder: Westview Press.
  • Ousmanova, Almira, 2003. “On the Ruins of Orthodox Marxism: Gender and Cultural Studies in Eastern Europe,” in Studies in East European Thought, 55(1): 37–50.
  • Pasquinelli, Carla, 1984. “Beyond the Longest Revolution: The Impact of the Italian Women's Movement on Cultural and Social Change,” Praxis International, 4: 131–136.
  • Schmitt, Richard, 1988. “Alienation and Autonomy,” Praxis International, 8: 222–236.
  • Schmitt, Richard, 1988. “A New Hypothesis about the Relations of Class, Race, and Gender: Capitalism as a Dependent System,” Social Theory and Practice, 14: 345–365.
  • Wendling, Amy, 2002. “Partial Liberations: The Machine, Gender, and High-Tech Culture,” in International Studies in Philosophy, 34(2): 169–185.

James Mill

Articles

  • Ball, Terence, 1980. “Utilitarianism, Feminism and the Franchise: James Mill and His Critics,” History of Political Thought, 1: 91–115.
  • Jose, Jim, 2000. “Contesting Patrilineal Descent in Political Theory: James Mill and Nineteenth-Century Feminism,” Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy, 15(1): 151–174.

John Stuart Mill

Books

  • Himmelfarb, Gertrude, 1974. On Liberty and Liberalism: The case of John Stuart Mill, New York: Knopf.
  • Morales, Maria H., 1996. Perfect Equality: John Stuart Mill on Well-Constituted Communities, Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield.
  • Pappe, H. O., 1962. John Stuart Mill and the Harriet Taylor Myth, New York: Cambridge University Press.
  • Pyle, Andrew (ed.), 1995. ‘The Subjection of Women’: Contemporary Responses to John Stuart Mill, Bristol: Thoemmes.

Articles

  • Annas, Julia, 1977. “Mill and the Subjection of Women,” Philosophy, 52: 179–194.
  • Brecher, Bob, 1993. “Why Patronize Feminists? A reply to Stove on Mill,” Philosophy, 68(265): 397–400.
  • Brown, D.G., 1998. “Stove's Reading of Mill,” Utlitas: A Journal of Utilitarian Studies, 10(1): 122–126.
  • Burgess, Jackson Keith, 1995. “John Stuart Mill, Radical Feminist,” Social Theory and Practice, 21(3): 389–396.
  • Donner, Wendy, 1993. “John Stuart Mill's Liberal Feminism,” Philosophical Studies, 69(2–3): 155–166.
  • Dyzanhaus, David, 1992. “John Staurt Mill and the Harm of Pornography,” Ethics, 102(3): 534–551.
  • Gerson, Gal, 2004. “Gender in the Liberal Tradition: Hobhouse on the Family,” in History of Political Thought, 25(4): 700–725.
  • Goldstein, Leslie, 1980. “Mill, Marx, and Women's Liberation,” Journal of the History of Philosophy, XVIII(3) (July).
  • Hornsby, Jennifer and Rae Langton, 1998. “Free Speech and Illocution,” Legal Theory, 4(1): 21–37.
  • Howes, John, 1986. “Mill on Women and Human Development,” Australasian Journal of Philosophy, Supp. 64: 66–74.
  • Knight, Jamie K., 1984. “With Liberty and Justice for Some,” International Journal of Applied Philosophy, 2: 85–90.
  • Mahowald, Mary B., 1980. “Against Paternalism: A Developmental View,” Philosophy Research Archives, 6: 1386.
  • Mahowald, Mary, 1975. “Freedom versus Happiness, and ‘Women's Lib,’” Journal of Social Philosophy, 6: 10–13.
  • Mendus, Susan, 1994. “John Stuart Mill and Harriet Taylor on Women and Marriage,” Utilitas, 6(2): 287–299.
  • Nubiola, Jaime, 1994. “Emancipacion, magnanimidad y mujeres,” Anuario Filosofico, 27(2): 641–654 (Spanish).
  • Robson, John M., 1977. “’Feminine’ and ‘Masculine’: Mill vs. Grote,” Mill Newsletter, 12: 18–22.
  • Shanley, Mary Lyndon, 1981. “Marital Slavery and Friendship: John Stuart Mills’ ‘The Subjection of Women,” Political Theory, 9: 229–247.
  • Skipper, Robert, 1993. “Mill and Pornography,” Ethics, 103(4): 726–730.
  • Smith, G.W., 2000. “J.S. Mill on What We Don't Know about Women,” in Utilitas: A Journal of Utilitarian Studies, 12(1): 41–61.
  • Tulloch, Gail, 1989. “Mill's Epistemology in Practice in His Liberal Feminism,” Educational Philosophy and Theory, 21(2): 32–39.
  • Williams, Reginald M., 2005. “Affirmative Action, the May the Best Person Win Intuition, and Mill's The Subjection of Women,” Public Affairs Quarterly, 19(1): 65–80.

Charles Sanders Peirce

Articles

  • Ayim, Maryann, 1983. “The Implications of Sexually Stereotypic Language as Seen Through Peirce's Theory of Signs,” Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society, 19: 183–198.
  • Chopp, Rebecca S., 1995. “Feminist Queries and Metaphysical Musings,” Modern Theology, 11(1): 47–63.
  • Moen, Marcia K., 1991. “Peirce's Pragmatism as a Resource for Feminism,” Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society, 435–450.
  • Sharp, Ann Margaret, 1994. “Peirce, Feminism, and Philosophy for Children,” in Children: Thinking and Philosophy, Daniela G. Camhy (ed.), Sankt Augustin: Academia.
  • Thayer-Bacon, Barbara, 2005. “Peirce on Education: Discussion of Peirce's Definition of a University,” in Studies in Philosophy and Education, 24(3–4): 317–325.

George Santayana

Articles

  • Miller, Marjorie C., 1994. “Essence and Identity: Santayana and the Category ‘Women,’” Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society, 30(1): 33–50.

Lady Mary Shepard

Books

  • Shepard, Lady Mary, 2000. Philosophical Works of Lady Mary Shepherd, J. Mc Robert (ed.), Bristol: Thoemmes Press.

Articles

  • Atherton, Margaret, 1996. “Lady Mary Shepherd's Case Against George Berkeley,” British Journal for the History of Philosophy, 4: 347–66.
  • Atherton, Margaret, 2005. “Reading Lady Mary Shepherd,” The Harvard Review of Philosophy, 13(2): 73 -85.

Other Nineteenth Century Philosophy

Books

  • Benstock, Shari (ed.), 1987. Feminist Issues in Literary Scholarship, Bloomington: Indiana University Press.
  • Boller, Paul Jr., 1974. American Transcendentalism, 1830–1860: An Intellectual Inquiry, New York: Putnam.
  • Eisenstein, Zillah R., 1981. The Radical Future of Liberal Feminism, New York: Longman.
  • McElroy, Wendy (ed.), 1982. Freedom, Feminism, and the State, Washington DC: Cato Institute.

Articles

  • Altman, Elizabeth C., 1976. “The Philosophical Bases of Feminism: The Feminist Doctrines of the Saint-Simonians and Charles Fourier,” Philosophical Forum (Boston), 7: 277–293.
  • Bar-On, Bat Ami, 1992. “The Feminist ‘Sexuality Debates’ and the Transformation of the Political,” Hypatia, 7(4): 45–58.
  • Berry, Edmund G., 1950. “Margaret Fuller Ossoli, 1810–1850,” Dalhousie Review, 30: 369–376.
  • Brouwer, Christien, 1988. “Nature in Terms of Femininity: The Case of Nineteenth Century Plant Geography,” Communication and Cognition, 21: 129–132.
  • Bruland, Esther Byle, 1989. “Evangelical and Feminist Ethics: Complex Solidarities,” Journal of Religious Ethics, 17(2): 139–160.
  • DuBois, Ellen, 1975. “The Radicalism of the Woman Suffrage Movement: Notes Toward the Reconstruction of Nineteenth-Century Feminism,” Feminist Studies, 3: 63–71.
  • Gardner, Catherine Villanueva, 2004. “Heaven-Appointed Educators of Mind: Catharine Beecher and the Moral Power of Women,” Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy, 19(2): 1–16.
  • George, Sam, 2005. “The Cultivation of the Female Mind: Enlightened Growth, Luxuriant Decay and Botanical Analogy in Eighteenth-Century Texts,” History of European Ideas, 31(2): 209–223.
  • Goldstein, Leslie Friedman, 1990. “Early European Feminism and American Women,” in Women's Rights and the Rights of Man, A. J. Arnaud (ed.), Oxford: Aberdeen.
  • Goldstein, Leslie Friedman, 1982. “Early Feminist Theories in French Utopian Socialism: The St. Simonians and Fourier,” Journal of the History of Ideas, 43: 91–108.
  • Gordon, Linda and Ellen DuBois, 1983. “Seeking Ecstasy on the Battlefield: Danger and Pleasures in Nineteenth Century Feminist Sexual Thought,” Feminist Studies, 9: 7–26.
  • Gurtler, Sabine, 2005. “The Ethical Dimension of Work: A Feminist Perspective,” Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy, Andrew F. Smith (trans.), 20(2): 119–134.
  • Harvey, Joy, 2004. “Almost a Man of Genius: Clemence Royer, Feminism, and Nineteenth-Century Science,” American Journal of Theology and Philosophy, 25(2) (May).
  • Jose, Jim, 2004. “No More Like Pallas Athena: Displacing Patrilineal Accounts of Modern Feminist Political Theory,” Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy, 19(4): 1–22.
  • Li, Shang-Jen, 2004. “The Nurse of Parasites: Gender Concepts in Patrick Manson's Parasitological Research,” Journal of the History of Biology, 37(1): 103–130.
  • McLaren, Angus, 1976. “Sex and Socialism: The Opposition of the French Lefts to Birth Control in the Nineteenth Century,” Journal of the History of Ideas, 37: 475–492.
  • Morantz-Sanchez-Regina, 2000. “Negotiating Power at the Bedside: Historical Perspectives on Nineteenth-Century Patients and Their Gynecologists,” Feminist Studies, 26(2): 287–309.
  • Palmer, L. M., 1994. “The End of the End of Ideology,” History of European Ideas, 49(4–6): 709–713.
  • Pedersen, Joyce Senders, 1987. “Education, gender, and Social Change in Victorian Liberal Feminist Theory,” History of European Ideas, 8: 503–519.
  • Pettit, Clare, 2002. “An Everyday Story: Wives, Daughters and Nineteenth-Century Natural Science,” Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences, 33C(2): 325–335.
  • Polyakov, L. V., 1992. “Women's Emancipation and the Theology of Sex in Nineteenth Century Russia,” Philosophy East and West, 42(2): 297–308.
  • Pratt, Scott L., 2004. “Rebuilding Babylon: The Pluralism of Lydia Maria Child,” Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy, 19(2): 92–104.
  • Raymond, Camille, 2003. “L'utopie feminine americaine au 19e siecle: Victoria Woodhull et Tennessee Claflin,” Horizons Philosophiques, 14(1): 56–76.
  • Riot-Sarcey, Michele and Eleni Varikas, 1986. “Feminist Consciousness in the Nineteenth Century: The Consciousness of a Pariah?” Praxis International, 5: 443–465.
  • Rogers, Dorothy G., 2004. “Before Care: Marietta Kies, Lucia Ames Mead, and Feminist Political Theory,” Hypatia: A Feminist Journal of Philosophy, 19(2): 105–117.
  • Schafer, Sylvia, 1992. “When the Child is the Father of the Man: Work, Sexual Difference, and the Guardian-State in Third Republic France,” History and Theory, 31(4): 98–115.
  • Sears, W. P., 1947. “The Educational Theories of Louisa May Alcott,” Dalhousie Review, 27: 327–334.
  • Walhout, Donald, 2001. “Julia Gulliver as Philosopher,” Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy, 16(1): 72–89.
  • Wenzel, Catherina, 2000. “Wenn aus Drachen Prinzessinnen werden: Liselotte Richter als Universitatsprofessorin und leidenschaftlich religiose Denkerin,” Theologie und Philosophie: vierteljahresschrift, 75(2): 250–261 (German).
  • Wosk, Julie, 1993. “The ‘Electric Eve’: Galvanizing Women in Nineteenth and Twentieth Century Art and Technology,” Research in Philosophy and Technology, 13: 43–56.

Topics — Utilitarianism

Articles

  • Boralevi, Lea Campos, 1987. “Utilitarianism and Feminism,” in Women in Western Political Philosophy, Ellen Kennedy and Susan Mendus (eds.), Brighton: Wheatsheaf Books.
  • De Miguel Alvarez, Ana, 2001. “Aportiaciones a una reconstruccion del debate sobre la igualdad sexual en la tradicion utilitarista,” Telos: Revista Iberoamerica de Estudios Utilitaristas, 10(2): 21–36.
  • Schultz, Bart, 2000. “Sidgwick's Feminism,” Utilitas: A Journal of Utilitarian Studies, 12(3): 379–401.

Nineteenth Century Continental Philosophy

Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel

Books

  • Dunayevskaya, Raya, 2003. Philosophy and Revolution: From Hegel to Sartre, and from Marx to Mao, Lanham Maryland: Lexington Books.
  • Dunayevskaya, Raya, 2002. The Power of Negativity: Selected Writings on the Dialetic in Hegel and Marx, Kevin B. Anderson and Peter Hudis (eds.), New York: Lexington Books.
  • Gauthier, Jeffrey A., 1997. Hegel and Feminist Social Criticism: Justice, Recognition, and the Feminine, Albany: SUNY Press.
  • Hegel, G.W.F., 1973. The Philosophy of Right, T.M. Knox (trans), Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  • Mills, Patricia Jagentowicz, 1996. Feminist Interpretations of G. W. F. Hegel, University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.
  • Mills, Patricia Jagentowicz, 1987. Woman, Nature, and Psyche, New Haven: Yale University Press.

Articles

  • Armstrong, Susan, 1997. “A Feminist Reading of Hegel and Kierkegaard,” in Hegel, History, and Interpretation, Shaun Gallagher (ed.), Albany: SUNY Press.
  • Arthur, Chris, 1988. “Hegel as Lord and Master,” Radical Philosophy, 50: 19–25.
  • Assiter, Alison, 1988. “Autonomy and Pornography,” in Feminist Perspectives in Philosophy, Morwenna Griffiths (ed.), Bloomington: Indiana University Press.
  • Bauer, Nancy, 2001. “Being-with as Being-Against: Heidegger Meets Hegel in the Second Sex,” Continental Philosophy Review, 34(2): 129–149.
  • Benhabib, Seyla, 1996. “On Hegel, Women, and Irony,” in Feminist Interpretations of G.W.F. Hegel, Patricia Jagentowicz Mills (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.
  • Blum, Lawrence, 1982. “Kant's and Hegel's Moral Rationalism: A Feminist Perspective,” Canadian Journal of Philosophy, 12(2): 287–302.
  • Brace, Laura, 2002. “The Tragedy of the Freelance Hustler: Hegel, Gender and Civil Society,” Contemporary Political Theory, 1(3): 329–347.
  • Brod, Harry, 1988. “Pornography and the Alienation of Male Sexuality,” Social Theory and Practice, 14: 265–284.
  • Brown, Alison L., 1996. “Hegelian Silences and the Politics of Communication: A Feminist Appropriation,” in Feminist Interpretations of G.W.F. Hegel, Patricia Jagentowicz Mills (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.
  • Burke, Victoria I., 2002. “On Development: World, Limit, Translation,” Clio: A Journal of Literature, History, and the Philosophy of History, 31(2): 115–128.
  • Changfoot, Nadine, 2004. “Feminist Standpoint Theory, Hegel and the Dialectical Self: Shifting the Foundations,” Philosophy and Social Criticism, 30(4): 477–502.
  • Changfoot, Nadine, 2002.“Hegel's Antigone: A Response to the Feminist Critique,” Owl of Minerva, 33(2): 179–204.
  • Clarke, Eric O., 1996. “Fetal Attraction: Hegel's An-aesthics of Gender,” in Feminist Interpretations of G.W.F. Hegel, Patricia Jagentowicz Mills (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.
  • Cutrofello, Andrew, 1994. “Hegel's Confessions; or, Why We Need a Sequel to the ‘Phenomenology of Spirit,’” Owl of Minerva, 26(1): 21–28.
  • DeBoer, Karin, 2003. “Hegel's Antigone and the Dialectics of Sexual Difference,” Philosophy Today, 47: 140–146.
  • DeBoer, Karin, 2003. “Het onderbroken werk van de natuur: Hegels begrip van de seksuele differentie,” Algemeen Nederlands Tijdschrift voor wijsbegeerte, 95(4): 237–249.
  • Deranty, Jean-Philippe, 2000. “The Son of Civil Society: Tensions in Hegel's Account of Womanhood,” Philosophical Forum, 31(2): 145–162.
  • During, Lisabeth, 2000. “Catherine Malabou and the Currency of Hegelianism,” Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy, 15(4): 190–195.
  • Easton, Susan, 1984. “Hegel and Feminism,” Radical Philosophy, 38.
  • Easton, Susan, 1985. “Slavery and Freedom: A Feminist Reading of Hegel,” Politics, 5(2): 22–28.
  • Fuchs, Jo Ann Pilardi, 1986. “On the War Path and Beyond: Hegel, Freud, and Feminist Theory,” Hypatia, WSIF 1: 565–572.
  • Gould, Timothy, 1982. “Intensity and its Audiences: Notes Towards a Feminist Perspective,” Canadian Journal of Philosophy, 12: 287–302.
  • Harrington, Thea, 1998. “The Speaking Abject in Kristeva's ‘Powers of Horror,’” Hypatia, 13(1): 138–157.
  • Hayim, Gila J., 1990. “Hegel's Critical Theory and Feminist Concerns,” Philosophy and Social Criticism, 1–21.
  • Hodge, Joanna, 1987. “Women and the Hegelian State,” in Women in Western Political Philosophy, Ellen Kennedy and Susan Mendus (eds.), Brighton: Wheatsheaf Books.
  • Holland, Nancy J., 1995. “Convergence on Whose Truth?: Feminist Philosophy and the ‘Masculine Intellect’ of Pragmatism,” Journal of Social Philosophy, 26(2): 170–183.
  • Huntington, Patricia, 2002. “The Couple Must Become Spiritualized: A Response to Changfoot,” Owl of Minerva, 33(2): 233–249.
  • Hutchings, Kimberly, 2000. “Antigone: Toward a Hegelian Feminist Philosophy,” Bulletin of the Hegel Society of Great Britain, 41–42: 120–131.
  • Hutchings, Kimberly, 2003. “Hegel and Feminist Philosophy,” Res Publica: A Journal of Legal and Social Philosophy, 10:3.
  • Irigaray, Luce, 1996. “The Eternal Irony of the Community,” in Feminist Interpretations of G.W.F. Hegel, Patricia Jagentowicz Mills (ed.), Gillian C. Gill (trans.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.
  • James, Christine, 1997. “Hegel, Harding, and Objectivity,” Southwest Philosophy Review, 14(1): 111–122.
  • Kain, Philip J., 2002. “Hegel, Antigone, and Women,” Owl of Minerva, 33(2): 157–177.
  • Krell, David Farrell, 1996. “Lucinde's Shame: Hegel, Sensuous Woman, and the Law,” in Feminist Interpretations of G.W.F. Hegel, Patricia Jagentowicz Mills (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.
  • LaMothe, Kimerer L., 2005. “Reason, Religion, and Sexual Difference: Resources for a Feminist Philosophy of Religion in Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit,” Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy, 20(1): 120–149.
  • Lonzi, Carla, 1996. “Let's Split on Hegel,” in Feminist Interpretations of G.W.F. Hegel, Patricia Jagentowicz Mills (ed.), Giovanna Bellesia and Elaine Maclachlan (trans.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.
  • Malabou, Catherine, 2000. “The Future of Hegel: Plasticity, Temporality, Dialectic,” Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy, 15(4): 196–220.
  • Malabou, Catherine, 2001. “History and the Process of Mourning in Hegel and Freud,” Radical Philosophy: A Journal of Socialist and Feminist Philosophy, 106(March-April): 15–20.
  • Mills, Patricia Jagentowicz, 1992. “’Feminist’ Sympathy and Other Serious Crimes: A Reply to Swindle,” Owl of Minerva, 24(1): 55–62.
  • Mills, Patricia Jagentowicz, 1979. “Hegel and ‘the Woman Question’: Recognition and Intersubjectivity,” in The Sexism of Social and Political Theory. L. Clark and L. Lange (eds.), Toronto: University of Toronto Press.
  • Mills, Patricia Jagentowicz, 1986. “Hegel's ‘Antigone,’” Owl of Minerva, 17: 131–152.
  • Mills, Patricia Jagentowicz, 1991. “Woman's Experience: Re the Dialectic of Desire and Recognition,” in Writing the Politics of Difference, Albany: SUNY Press.
  • Mills, Patricia Jagentowicz, 1996. “Hegel's Antigone,” in Feminist Interpretations of G.W.F. Hegel, Patricia Jagentowicz Mills (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.
  • Mills, Patricia Jagentowicz, 2002. “Hegel's Anitgone Redux: Woman in Four Parts,” Owl of Minerva, 33(2): 205–221.
  • O'Brien, Mary, 1996. “Hegel: Man, Physiology, and Fate,” in Feminist Interpretations of G.W.F. Hegel, Patricia Jagentowicz Mills (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.
  • Oliver, Kelly, 1996. “Antigone's Ghost: Undoing Hegel's ‘Phenomenology of Spirit,’” Hypatia, 11(1): 67–90.
  • Olsen, Frances, 1996. “Hegel, Sexual Ethics, and the Oppression of Women: Comments on Krell's ‘Lucinde's Shame’,” in Feminist Interpretations of G.W.F. Hegel, Patricia Jagentowicz Mills (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.
  • Parente, Alfredo, 1982. “Una Feminista che Esortava a Sputare su Hegel,” Riv. Stud. Croce, 19: 204–205. (Italian)
  • Pateman, Carole, 1996. “Hegel, Marriage, and the Standpoint of Contract,” in Feminist Interpretations of G.W.F. Hegel, Patricia Jagentowicz Mills (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.
  • Perez Estevez, Antonio, 1991. “Lo Femenino en la Filosofia del Derecho de Hegel,” Revista de Filosofio (Venezuela), 15: 11–20. (Spanish)
  • Ravven, Heidi M., 1988. “Has Hegel Anything to Say to Feminists?,” Owl of Minerva, 19: 149–168.
  • Ravven, Heidi M., 1992. “A Response to ‘Why Feminists Should Take the ‘Phenomenology of Spirit’ Seriously,” Owl of Minerva, 24(1): 63–68.
  • Ravven, Heidi Miriam, 2002. “Further Thoughts on Hegel and Feminism: A Response to Philip J. Kain and Nadine Changfoot,” in Owl and Minerva, 33(2): 223–231.
  • Rogers, Dorothy G., 1999. “Hegel, Women, and Hegelian Women on Matters of Public and Private,” Studies in Philosophy and Education, 18(4): 235–255.
  • Rosenthal, Abigail, 1973. “Feminism Without Contradictions,” Monist, 57: 28–42.
  • Schor, Naomi, 1996. “Reading in Detail: Hegel's Aesthetics and the Feminine,” in Feminist Interpretations of G.W.F. Hegel, Patricia Jagentowicz Mills (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.
  • Sembou, Evangelia, 2003. “Antigone and Lysistrata in G.W.F. Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit,” Jahrbuch fuer Hegelforschung, 8–9: 31–52.
  • Starrett, Shari Neller, 1996. “Critical Relations in Hegel: Woman, Family, and the Divine,” in Feminist Interpretations of G.W.F. Hegel, Patricia Jagentowicz Mills (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.
  • Stone, Alison, 2002. “Feminist Criticisms and Reinterpretations of Hegel,” Bulletin of the Hegel Society of Great Britain, 45–46: 93–109.
  • Stone, Alison, 2003. “Hegel's Dialectic and the Recognition of Feminine Difference,” Philosophy Today, 47: 132–139.
  • Swindle, Stuart, 1992. “Why Feminists Should Take the ‘Phenomenology of Spirit’ Seriously,” Owl of Minerva, 24(1): 41–54.

Søren Kierkegaard

Books

  • Leon, Celine and Sylvia Walsh (eds.), 1997. Feminist Interpretations of Soren Kierkegaard, University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.

Articles

  • Agacinski, Sylviane, 1997. “An Aparte on Repetition,” in Feminist Interpretations of Soren Kierkegaard, Celine Leon and Sylvia Walsh (eds.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.
  • Agacinski, Sylviane, 2002. “We Are Not Sublime: Love and Sacrifice, Abraham and Ourselves,” in Feminism and History of Philosophy, Genevieve Lloyd (ed.), New York: Oxford University Press.
  • Armstrong, Susan, 1997. “A Feminist Reading of Hegel and Kierkegaard,” in Hegel, History, and Interpretation, Shaun Gallagher (ed.), Albany: SUNY Press.
  • Berry, Wanda Warren, 1995. “Kierkegaard and Feminism: Apologetic, Repetition, and Dialogue in Kierkegaard,” in Post/Modernity, Martin J. Matustik (ed.), Bloomington: Indiana University Press.
  • Berry, Wanda Warren, 1997. “The Heterosexual Imagination and Aesthetic Existence in Kierkegaard's Either/Or, Part I,” in Feminist Interpretations of Soren Kierkegaard, Celine Leon and Sylvia Walsh (eds.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.
  • Berry, Wanda Warren, 1997. “The Silent Woman in Kierkegaard's Later Religious Writings,” in Feminist Interpretations of Soren Kierkegaard, Celine Leon and Sylvia Walsh (eds.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.
  • Bertung, Birgit, 1997. “Yes, a Woman Can Exist,” in Feminist Interpretations of Soren Kierkegaard, Celine Leon and Sylvia Walsh (eds.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.
  • Cahoy, William J., 1995. “One Species or Two: Kierkegaard's Anthropology and the Feminist Critique of the Concept of Sin,” Modern Theology, 11(4): 429–454.
  • De Lacoste, Guillermine, 2002. “A Feminist Interpretation of the Leaps in Kierkegaard's Fear and Trembling,” in Philosophy Today, 46(1): 3–15.
  • Duran, Jane, 1997. “The Kierkegaardian Feminist,” in Feminist Interpretations of Soren Kierkegaard, Celine Leon and Sylvia Walsh (eds.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.
  • Howe, Leslie A., 1994. “Kierkegaard and the Feminine Self,” Hypatia, 9(4): 131–157.
  • Kruks, Sonia, 1998. “Existentialism and Phenomenology,” in A Companion to Feminist Philosophy, Alison M. Jaggar (ed.), Cambridge: Blackwell.
  • Leon, Celine, 1997. “(A) Woman's Place Within the Ethical,” in Feminist Interpretations of Soren Kierkegaard, Celine Leon and Sylvia Walsh (eds.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.
  • Leon, Celine, 2000. “Can a Woman Be Kept? The Meaning of Repetition's Repetitions,” in Kierkegaard Studies: Yearbook, 61–77.
  • Leon, Celine, 2000. “The (In-)Appropriateness of Using the Feminine as Paradigm: The Case of Kierkegaard,” in Philosophy Today, 44(4): 339–346.
  • Leon, Celine, 1997. “The No Woman's Land of Kierkegaardian Exceptions,” in Feminist Interpretations of Soren Kierkegaard, Celine Leon and Sylvia Walsh (eds.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.
  • Lorraine, Tamsin, 1997. “Amatory Cures for Material Dis-ease: A Kristevian Reading of The Sickness Unto Death,” in Feminist Interpretations of Soren Kierkegaard, Celine Leon and Sylvia Walsh (eds.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.
  • Makarushka, Irena, 1992. “Reflections on the ‘Other’ in Dineson, Kierkegaard, and Nietzsche,” in Kierkegaard on Art and Communication, George Pattison (ed.), New York: St. Martin's Press.
  • McBride, William L., 1995. “Sartre's Debts to Kierkegaard: A Partial Reckoning,” in Post/Modernity, Martin J. Matustik (ed.), Bloomington: Indiana University Press.
  • Perkins, Robert L., 1997. “Woman-Bashing in Kierkegaard's ‘In Vino Veritas’: A Reinscription of Plato's Symposium,” in Feminist Interpretations of Soren Kierkegaard, Celine Leon and Sylvia Walsh (eds.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.
  • Taylor, Mark Lloyd, 1997. “Almost Earnestness? Autobiographical Reading, Feminist Re-Reading, and Kierkegaard's Concluding Unscientific Postscript,” in Feminist Interpretations of Soren Kierkegaard, Celine Leon and Sylvia Walsh (eds.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.
  • Walsh, Sylvia I., 1987. “On ‘Feminine’ and ‘Masculine’ Forms of Despair,” in The Sickness Unto Death, Robert L. Perkins (ed.), Macon: Mercer University Press.
  • Walsh, Sylvia I., 1997. “Subjectivity versus Objectivity: Kierkegaard's ‘Postscript’ and Feminist Epistemology,” in International Kierkegaard Commentary, Robert L. Perkins (ed.), Macon: Mercer University Press.
  • Walsh, Sylvia, 1998. “Feminine Devotion and Self-Abandonment: Simone de Beauvoir and Soren Kierkegaard on the Woman in Love,” in Philosophy Today, 42(suppl.): 35–40.
  • Walsh, Sylvia, 2000. “When That Single Individual Is a Woman,” Kierkegaard Studies: Yearbook, 1–18.
  • Watkin, Julia, 1997. “The Logic of Soren Kierkegaard's Misogyny, 1854–1855,” in Feminist Interpretations of Soren Kierkegaard, Celine Leon and Sylvia Walsh (eds.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.

Friedrich Nietzsche

Books

  • Graybeal, Jean, 1990. Language and ‘The Feminine,’ in Nietzsche and Heidegger, Bloomington: Indiana University Press.
  • Oliver, Kelly and Marilyn Pearsall (eds.), 1998. Feminist Interpretations of Friedrich Nietzsche, University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.
  • Perez Estevez, Antonio, 1989. El individuo y la feminidad, Zulia: University of Zulia (Portugese).
  • Schutte, Ofelia, 1984. Beyond Nihilism: Nietzsche Without Masks, Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Articles

  • Ainley, Alison, 1988. “Ideal Selfishness: Nietzsche's Metaphor of Maternity,” in Exceedingly Nietzsche, David Farrell Krell (ed.), London: Routledge and K. Paul.
  • Addelson, Kathryn Pyne, 1983. “Awakening,” Hypatia, WSIF 1: 583–595.
  • Alcoff, Linda Martin, 2004. “Schutte's Nietzschean Postcolonial Politics,” Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy, 19(3): 144–156.
  • Armour, Ellen T., 1997. “Questions of Proximity: ‘Woman's Place’ in Derrida and Irigaray,” Hypatia, 12(1): 63–78.
  • Babich, Babette E., 2000. “Nietzsche and Eros between the Devil and God's Deep Blue Sea: The Problem of the Artist As Actor-Jew-Woman,” Continental Philosophy Review, 33(2): 159–188.
  • Bach, Craig N., 2001. “Nietzsche and the Big Sleep: Style, Women and Truth,” Film and Philosophy, 5–6: 45–59.
  • Behler, Diana, 1993. “Nietzsche and Postfeminism,” Nietzsche Studien, 22: 355–370.
  • Bergoffen, Debra B., 1989. “On the Advantage and Disadvantage of Nietzsche for Women,” in The Question of the Other, Arleen B. Dallery (ed.), Albany: SUNY Press.
  • Bergoffen, Debra B., 1994. “Nietzsche Was No Feminist...” International Studies in Philosophy, 26(3): 23–31.
  • Bergoffen, Debra B., 2004. “Engaging Nietzsche's Women: Ofelia Schutte and the Madres de la Plaza de Mayo,” Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy, 19(3): 157–168.
  • Bergoffen, Debra B., 2002. “Nietzsche's Existential Signatures,” International Studies in Philosophy, 34(3): 83–93.
  • Bertram, Maryanne J., 1981. “’God's ‘Second’ Blunder’ – Serpent Woman and the ‘Gestalt’ in Nietzsche's Thought,” Southern Journal of Philosophy, 19: 259–278.
  • Booth, David, 1991. “Nietzsche's ‘Woman’ Rhetoric,” History of Philosophy Quarterly, 8(3): 311–325.
  • Brown, Kristen, 1999. “Possible and Questionable: Opening Nietzsche's Genealogy to Feminine Body,” Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy, 14(3): 39–58.
  • Burney Davis, Terri, 1989. “The Vita Femina and Truth,” History of European Ideas, 841–847.
  • Card, Claudia, 1996. “Genealogies and Perspectives: Feminist and Lesbian Reflections,” International Studies in Philosophy, 28(3): 99–111.
  • Carley, Craig, 1999. “Nietzsche's Misogyny: A Class Action Suit,” Proceedings of the Heraclitean Society: A Report on Philosophy and Criticism of the Arts and Sciences, 19: 18–30.
  • Clark, Maudemarie, 1994. “Nietzsche's Misogyny,” International Studies in Philosophy, 26(3): 3–12.
  • Conway, Daniel W., 1998. “The Slave Revolt in Epistemology,” in Feminist Interpretations of Nietzsche, Kelly Oliver and Marilyn Pearsall (eds.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.
  • Derrida, Jacques, 1998. “The Question of Style” in Feminist Interpretations of Nietzsche, Kelly Oliver and Marilyn Pearsall (eds.), Ruben Berezdivin (trans.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.
  • Deutscher, Penelope, 2002. “‘Is It Not Remarkable that Nietzsche…Should Have Hated Rousseau?’ Woman, Femininity: Distancing Nietzsche from Rousseau,” in Feminism and History of Philosophy, Genevieve Lloyd (ed.), New York: Oxford University Press.
  • Diethe, Carol, 1989. “Nietzsche and the Woman Question,” History of European Ideas, 865–875.
  • Diethe, Carol, 1998. “Nietzsche's Women: Beyond the Whip,” New Nietzsche Studies: The Journal of the Nietzsche Studies, 2(3–4) (Summer).
  • Diprose, Rosalyn, 1989. “Nietzsche, Ethics, and Sexual Difference,” Radical Philosophy, 52: 27–33.
  • Froese, Katrin, 2005. “Woman's Eclipse: The Silenced Feminine in Nietzsche and Heidegger,” in Philosophy and Social Criticism, 31(2): 165–184.
  • Garcia, del Pozo, Rosario, 2003. “Subjetividad femenina y genealogia del humanismo,” Themata: Revista de Filosofia, 31: 77–87.
  • Graybeal, Jean, 1998. “Ecce Homo: Abjection and ‘the Feminine’,” in Feminist Interpretations of Nietzsche, Kelly Oliver and Marilyn Pearsall (eds.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.
  • Grenke, Michael W., 2002. “Man in the Middle,” in International Studies in Philosophy, 34(3): 153–169.
  • Helm, Barbara, 2004. “Combating Misogyny? Responses to Nietzsche by Turn-of-the-Century German Feminists,” in Journal of Nietzsche Studies, 27(Spring): 64–84.
  • Freyelberg, Bernard D., 1989. “Nietzsche in Derrida's Spurs: Deconstruction as Deracination,” History of European Ideas, 685–692.
  • Higgins, Kathleen Marie, 1995. “Gender in ‘The Gay Science,’” Philosophy and Literature, 19(2): 227–247.
  • Holm, Elly and Paul Cilliers, 1998. “Beyond the Politics of Positionality: Deconstruction and Feminism,” South African Journal of Philosophy, 17(4): 377–394.
  • Irigaray, Luce, 1991. Marine Lover of Friedrich Nietzsche, Gillian C. Gill (trans.), New York: Columbia University Press.
  • Irigaray, Luce, 1998. “Veiled Lips,” in Feminist Interpretations of Nietzsche, Kelly Oliver and Marilyn Pearsall (eds.), Sara Speidel (trans.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.
  • Kofman, Sarah, 1998. “Baubo: Theological Perversion and Fetishism,” in Feminist Interpretations of Nietzsche, Kelly Oliver and Marilyn Pearsall (eds.), Tracy B. Strong (trans.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.
  • Johnson, Pauline, 1996. “Nietzsche Reception Today,” Radical Philosophy, 80: 24–33.
  • Joos, Ernest, 1985. “Nietzsche et les Femmes,” Laval Theol. Phil, 41: 305–315 (French).
  • Kaufman, Cynthia, 1998. “Knowledge as Masculine Heroism or Embodied Perception: Knowledge, Will, and Desire in Nietzsche,” Hypatia, 13(4): 63–87.
  • Lorraine, Tamsin, 1994. “Nietzsche and Feminism: Transvaluing Women in ‘Thus Spoke Zarathustra,” International Studies in Philosophy, 26(3): 13–21.
  • Makarushka, Irena, 1992. “Reflections on the ‘Other’ in Dineson, Kierkegaard, and Nietzsche,” in Kierkegaard on Art and Communication, George Pattison (ed.), New York: St. Martin's Press.
  • Malet, N., 1977. “L'Homme et la Femme dans la Philosophie de Nietzsche,” Rev. Metaph. Morale, 82: 38–63.
  • Marion, Jean Luc, 1993. “The Exactitude of the ‘Ego,’” American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly, 67(4): 561–568.
  • Menck, Christoph, 1993. “Schwerpunkt: Nietzsche und die Praktische Philosophie,” Deutsche Zeitschrift fur Philosophie, 41(5): 828–830 (German).
  • Mortensen, Ellen, 1993. “Irigaray and Nietzsche: Echo and Narcissus Revisited?,” in The Fate of the New Nietzsche, Keith Ansell-Pearson (ed.), Brookfield: Avebury.
  • Munnich, Susana, 1996. “En torno a la frase de Nietzsche ‘Le verdad es mujar,’” Convivium, 9: 77–91 (Spanish).
  • Oliver, Kelly, 1993. “The Plaint of Ariadne: Luce Irigaray's ‘Amante Marine de Friedrich Nietzsche,” in The Fate of the New Nietzsche, Keith Ansell-Pearson (ed.), Brookfield: Avebury.
  • Oliver, Kelly, 1998. “Woman as Truth in Nietzsche's Writing,” in Feminist Interpretations of Nietzsche, Kelly Oliver and Marilyn Pearsall (eds.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.
  • Oliver, Kelly and Marilyn Pearsall, 1998. “Introduction: Why Feminists Read Nietzsche,” in Feminist Interpretations of Nietzsche, Kelly Oliver and Marilyn Pearsall (eds.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.
  • Orniston, Gayle, 1984. “Traces of Derrida: Nietzsche's Image of Woman,” Philosophy Today, 28: 178–188.
  • Owen, David, 1993. “Nietzsche's Squandered Seductions: Feminism, the Body, and the Politics of Genealogy,” in The Fate of the New Nietzsche, Keith Ansell-Pearson (ed.), Brookfield: Avebury.
  • Parens, Erik, 1989. “Derrida, ‘Woman,’ and Politics: A Reading of ‘Spurs,’” Philosophy Today, 33(4): 291–301.
  • Pasons, Katherine Pyne, 1974. “Nietzsche and Moral Change,” Feminist Studies, 2: 57–76.
  • Patton, Paul (ed.), 1999. “Nietzsche, Feminism, and Political Theory,” New Nietzsche Studies: The Journal of the Nietzsche Society, 3(3–4) (Summer-Fall).
  • Picart, Carline Joan S., 2002. “Resentment and the ‘Feminine’ in Nietzsche's Politico-Aesthetics,” Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy, 17(3) (Summer).
  • Reguera, Isidoro, 1996. “El Nietzsche practico de Nolte: Nietzsche, profeta tragico de la guerra y organizador politico de la aniquilacion,” Revista de Filosofia (Spain), 8(14): 127–157 (Spanish).
  • Riser, John, 2001. “Two Types of Nihilism and Their Contemporary Relevance,” in International Studies in Philosophy, 33(4): 77–98.
  • Schrift, Alan D., 1994. “On the Gift-Giving Virtue: Nietzsche's Unacknowledged Feminine Economy,” International Studies in Philosophy, 26(3): 33–44.
  • Schutte, Ofelia, 1998. “Nietzsche's Politics,” in Feminist Interpretations of Nietzsche, Kelly Oliver and Marilyn Pearsall (eds.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.
  • Scott, Jacqueline, 1999. “Nietzsche and the Problem of Women's Bodies,” International Studies in Philosophy, 31(3): 65–75.
  • Singer, Linda, 1998. “Nietzschean Mythologies: The Inversion of Value and the War Against Women,” in Feminist Interpretations of Nietzsche, Kelly Oliver and Marilyn Pearsall (eds.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press).
  • Thompson, J. L., 1990. “Nietzsche on Woman,” International Journal of Moral and Social Studies, 207–220.
  • Tirrell, Lynne, 1998. “Sexual Dualism and Women's Self-Creation: On the Advantages and Disadvantages of Reading Nietzsche for Feminists,” in Feminist Interpretations of Nietzsche, Kelly Oliver and Marilyn Pearsall (eds.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.
  • Wininger, Kathleen J., 1998. “Nietzsche's Women and Women's Nietzsche,” in Feminist Interpretations of Nietzsche, Kelly Oliver and Marilyn Pearsall (eds.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press).
  • Wischke, Mirko, 1995. “The Conflict of Morality with Basic Life Instincts,” Filozofska Istrazivanja, 15(4): 673–681 (Serbo-Croatian).
  • Wischke, Mirko, 1996. “The Conflict of Morality with Basic Life Instincts,” Synthesis Philosophica, 11(1): 39–48.
  • Wolfenstein, Eugene Victor, 2002. “Inside/Outside Nietzsche: Psychoanalytic Explorations,” Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy, 17(1).

Twentieth Century Philosophy

Sigmund Freud

Books

  • Cooke, Brett, George E. Slusser, and Jaume Marti-Olivella (eds.), 1998. The Fantastic Other: An Interface of Perspectives, Amsterdam: Rodopi.
  • Flax, Jane, 1989. Thinking Fragments: Psychoanalysis, Feminism, and Postmodernism in the Contemporary West, Berkeley: University of California Press.
  • Mills, Patricia Jagentowicz, 1987. Woman, Nature, and Psyche, New Haven: Yale University Press.
  • Nordquist, Joan, 2001. Social Theory: A Bibliographic Series, No. 64—Feminism and Psychoanalysis: A Bibliography, Santa Cruz: Reference & Research Services.
  • O'Neill, John (ed.), 1996. Freud and the Passions, University Park: Pennsylvania University Press.
  • Sayers, Janet, 1982. Biological Politics, London: Tavistock.

Articles

  • Beardsworth, Sara, 2005. “Freud's Oedipus and Kristeva's Narcissus: Three Heterogeneities,” in Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy, 20(1): 54–77.
  • Benjamin, Jessica, 1994. “The Shadow of the Other (Subject): Intersubjectivity and Feminist Theory,” Constellations, 1(2): 231–254.
  • Brennan, Teresa, 1996. “Essence Against Identity,” Metaphilosophy, 27(1–2): 92–103.
  • Davis, Karen Elizabeth, 1990. “I Love Myself When I am Laughing: A New Paradigm for Sex,” Journal of Social Philosophy, 5–24.
  • Ferguson, Ann, 1986. “Motherhood and Sexuality: Some Feminist Questions,” Hypatia, 1: 3–22.
  • Fuchs, Jo Ann Pilardi, 1983. “On the War Path and Beyond: Hegel, Freud, and Feminist Theory,” Women Studies International Forum, 6: 565–572.
  • Harrington, Thea, 1998. “The Speaking Abject in Kristeva's ‘Powers of Horror,’” Hypatia, 13(1): 138–157.
  • Hasan, Rafeeq, 2001. “Micropolitics: Leo Bersani and Conflicts in Contemporary Feminism,” in Radical Philosophy: A Journal of Socialist and Feminist Philosophy, 110(November-December): 20–30.
  • Hengehold, Laura, 1993. “Rape and Communicative Agency: Reflections in the Lake at L-,” Hypatia, 8(4): 56–71.
  • Keiser, R. Melvin, 1990. “Postcritical Religion and the Latent Freud,” Zygon, 433–447.
  • Kittay, Eva Feder, 1894. “Rereading Freud on ‘Femininity,’ or Why Not ‘Womb’ Envy,” Women Studies International Forum, 2: 385–391.
  • Malabou, Catherine, 2001. “History and the Process of Mourning in Hegel and Freud” in Radical Philosophy: A Journal of Socialist and Feminist Philosophy, 106 (March-April). 15–20.
  • Metcalf, Robert, 2000. “The Truth of Shame-Consciousness in Freud and Phenomenology,” in Journal of Phenomenological Psychology, 31(1): 1–18.
  • Mothersill, Mary, 1973. “Notes on Feminism,” Monist, 57: 105–114.
  • Nissim Sabat, Marilyn, 1985. “Freud, feminism, and faith,” Listening, 20: 208–220.
  • Oliver, Kelly, 1993. “Fleshy Memory,” Radical Philosophy, 65: 30–32.
  • Oliver, Kelly, 2001. “The Look of Love,” in Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy, 16(3): 56–78.
  • Pawlowski, Pawel Maciej, 1998. “On Some Philosophical Problems of Sigmund Freud's Psychoanalytic Theory,” Kwartalnik Filozoficzny, 26(2): 101–114. (Polish)
  • Walsh, Mary, 2004. “Narratives of the Unsaid: Reading Sexual Difference in a Post Foundational Millenium,” in Philosophy in the Contemporary World, 11(1): 95–104.
  • Whitbeck, Caroline, 1976. “Theories of Sex Difference,” in Women and Philosophy: Toward a Theory of Liberation, Carol C. Gould and Marx W. Wartofsky (eds.), New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons.

Carl Gustav Jung

Books

  • Cooke, Brett, George E. Slusser, and Jaume Marti-Olivella (eds.), 1998. The Fantastic Other: An Interface of Perspectives, Amsterdam: Rodopi.
  • Stevernagel, Gertrude A., 1979. Political Philosophy as Therapy: Marcuse Reconsidered, Westport: Greenwood.

Articles

  • Keller, Catherine, 1990. “Reconnecting: A Reply to Robert Moore,” in Archetypal Process: Self and Divine in Whitehead, Jung, and Hillman, Evanston: Northwestern University Press.
  • Valle, Valerie A. and Elizabeth L. Kruger, 1981. “The Nature and Expression of Feminine Consciousness,” in The Metaphors of Consciousness, Rolf von Eckartsberg (ed.), New York: Plenum Press.
  • Whitbeck, Caroline, 1976. “Theories of Sex Difference,” in Women and Philosophy: Toward a Theory of Liberation, Carol C. Gould and Marx W. Wartofsky (eds.), New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons.

George Edward Moore

Articles

  • Martin, Bill, 1989. “ 'To the Lighthouse' and the Feminist Path to Posmodernity,” Philosophy and Literature, 13: 307–315.

Ayn Rand

Books

  • Goldstein, Mimi Reisel and Chris Matthews Sciabarra (eds.), 1991. Feminist Interpretations of Ayn Rand, University Park: Pennsylvania University Press.
  • Merrill, Ronald E., 1991. The Ideas of Ayn Rand, Peru: Open Court.

Articles

  • Branden, Barbara, 1999. “Ayn Rand: The Reluctant Feminist,” in Feminist Interpretations of Ayn Rand, Mimi Reisel Gladstein and Chris Matthew Sciabarra (eds.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 25–46.
  • Branden, Nathaniel, 1999. “Was Ayn Rand a Feminist?” in Feminist Interpretations of Ayn Rand, Mimi Reisel Gladstein and Chris Matthew Sciabarra (eds.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 223–230.
  • Brickell, Diana Mertz, 1999. “Sex and Gender Through an Egoist Lens: Masculinity and Femininity in the Philosophy of Ayn Rand,” in Feminist Interpretations of Ayn Rand, Mimi Reisel Gladstein and Chris Matthew Sciabarra (eds.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 319–332.
  • Brown, Susan Love, 1999. “Ayn Rand: The Woman Who Would Not Be President,” in Feminist Interpretations of Ayn Rand, Mimi Reisel Gladstein and Chris Matthew Sciabarra (eds.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 275–298.
  • Brownmiller, Susan, 1999. “Ayn Rand: A Traitor to Her Own Sex,” in Feminist Interpretations of Ayn Rand, Mimi Reisel Gladstein and Chris Matthew Sciabarra (eds.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 63–66.
  • Gladstein, Mimi Reisel, 1999. “Ayn Rand and Feminism: An Unlikely Alliance,” in Feminist Interpretations of Ayn Rand, Mimi Reisel Gladstein and Chris Matthew Sciabarra (eds.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 47–56.
  • Gramstad, Thomas, 1999. “The Female Hero: A Randian-Feminist Synthesis,” in Feminist Interpretations of Ayn Rand, Mimi Reisel Gladstein and Chris Matthew Sciabarra (eds.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 333–362.
  • Hardie, Melissa Jane, 1999. “Fluff and Granite: Rereading Rand's Camp Feminist Aesthetics,” in Feminist Interpretations of Ayn Rand, Mimi Reisel Gladstein and Chris Matthew Sciabarra (eds.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 363–389.
  • Harrison, Barbara Grizzuti, 1999. “Psyching Out Ayn Rand,” in Feminist Interpretations of Ayn Rand, Mimi Reisel Gladstein and Chris Matthew Sciabarra (eds.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 67–76.
  • Loiret-Prunet, Valerie, 1999. “Ayn Rand and Feminist Synthesis: Rereading We the Living,” in Feminist Interpretations of Ayn Rand, Mimi Reisel Gladstein and Chris Matthew Sciabarra (eds.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 83–114.
  • McElroy, Wendy, 1999. “Looking Through a Paradigm Darkly,” in Feminist Interpretations of Ayn Rand, Mimi Reisel Gladstein and Chris Matthew Sciabarra (eds.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 157–172.
  • Michalson, Karen, 1999. “Who is Dagny Taggart? The Epic Hero/ine in Disguise,” in Feminist Interpretations of Ayn Rand, Mimi Reisel Gladstein and Chris Matthew Sciabarra (eds.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 199–219.
  • Paglia, Camille, 1999. “Reflections on Ayn Rand,” in Feminist Interpretations of Ayn Rand, Mimi Reisel Gladstein and Chris Matthew Sciabarra (eds.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 77–79.
  • Presley, Sharon, 1999. “Ayn Rand's Philosophy of Individualism: A Feminist Psychologist's Perspective,” in Feminist Interpretations of Ayn Rand, Mimi Reisel Gladstein and Chris Matthew Sciabarra (eds.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 251–274.
  • Sheaffer, Robert, 1999. “Rereading Rand on Gender in the Light of Paglia,” in Feminist Interpretations of Ayn Rand, Mimi Reisel Gladstein and Chris Matthew Sciabarra (eds.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 299–318.
  • Taylor, Joan Kennedy, 1999. “Ayn Rand and the Concept of Feminism: A Reclamation,” in Feminist Interpretations of Ayn Rand, Mimi Reisel Gladstein and Chris Matthew Sciabarra (eds.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 231–250.
  • Wilt, Judith, 1999. “On Atlas Shrugged,” in Feminist Interpretations of Ayn Rand, Mimi Reisel Gladstein and Chris Matthew Sciabarra (eds.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 57–62.
  • Wilt, Judith, 1999. “The Romances of Ayn Rand,” in Feminist Interpretations of Ayn Rand, Mimi Reisel Gladstein and Chris Matthew Sciabarra (eds.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 173–198.

John Rawls

Books

  • Richards, Janet Radcliffe, 1980. The Sceptical Feminist: A Philosophical Inquiry, Boston: Routledge and K. Paul.

Articles

  • Agra, Maria Xose, 1994. “Justicia y Genero: Algunas cuestiones relevantes en torno a la teoria de la justicia de J. Rawls,” Anales de la Catedra Francisco Suarez, 31: 123–145 (Spanish).
  • Anderson, David, 1992. “False Stability in Rawlsian Liberalism,” Contemporary Philosophy, 14(5): 11–16.
  • Baehr, Amy R., 1996. “Toward a New Feminist Liberalism: Okin, Rawls, and Habermas,” Hypatia, 11(1): 49–66.
  • Brake, Elizabeth, 2004. “Rawls and Feminism: What Should Feminists Make of Liberal Neutrality?” in Journal of Moral Philosophy: An International Journal of Moral, Political and Legal Philosophy, 1(3): 293–309.
  • Card, Claudia, 2002. “Responsibility Ethics, Shared Understandings, and Moral Communities,” in Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy, 17(1): 141–155.
  • Cornell, Drucilla, 1995. “Response to Thomas McCarthy: The Political Alliance Between Ethical Feminism and Rawls's Kantian Constructivism,” Constellations, 2(2): 189–206.
  • Follesdal, Andreas, 2005. “Exit, Choice, and Loyalty: Religious Liberty versus Gender Equality,” in Journal of Social Philosophy, 36(4): 407–420.
  • Gaughran, Laurie, 1998. “Gender Reflection: Reconciling Feminism and Equality,” in Philosophy and Social Criticism, 24(50): 37–51.
  • Gatens, Moira, 1995. “Between the Sexes: Care or Justice?” in Introducing Applied Ethics, Brenda Almond (ed.), Cambridge: Blackwell.
  • Graham, Kevin M., 2000. “The Political Significance of Social Identity: A Critique of Rawls's Theory of Agency,” in Social Theory and Practice: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal of Social Philosophy, 26(2): 201–222.
  • Green, Karen, 1986. “Rawls, Women, and the Priority of Liberty,” Australasian Journal of Philosophy, Supp. 64: 26–36.
  • Green, Karen, 2006. “Parity and Procedural Justice,” in Essays in Philosophy, 7(1): 1–18.
  • Hedman, Carl, 1987. “Ethics and Group Conflict: Between Marxism and Liberalism,” Radical Philosophy, 46: 8–15.
  • Laden, Anthony Simon, 2003. “Radical Liberals, Reasonable Feminists: Reason, Power and Objectivity in MacKinnon and Rawls,” in Journal of Political Philosophy, 11(2): 133–152.
  • Meyers, Diana Tietjens, 1993. “Moral Reflections: Beyond Impartial Reason,” Hypatia, 8(3): 21–47.
  • Mills, Charles W., 2005. “Ideal Theory as Ideology,” in Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy, 20(3): 165–184.
  • Nussbaum, Martha, 2003. “Langfristige Fursorge und soziale Gerechtigkeit. Eine Herausforderung der konventionelle Ideen des Gesellschaftsvertrages,” in Deutsche Zeitschrift fuer Philosophie, 51(2): 179–198.
  • Nussbaum, Martha, 2003. “Political Liberalism and Respect: A Response to Linda Barclay,” in SATS: Nordic Journal of Philosophy, 4(2): 25–44.
  • Okin, Susan Moller, 1987. “Justice and Gender,” Philosophy and Public Affairs, 16: 42–72.
  • Okin, Susan Moller, 1994. “’Political Liberalism,’ Justice, and Gender,” Ethics, 105(1): 23–43.
  • Okin, Susan Moller, 1989. “Reason and Feeling in Thinking about Justice,” Ethics, 99: 229–249.
  • Pateman, Carole, 1980. “’The Disorder of Women’: Women, Love, and the Sense of Justice,” Ethics, 91: 20–31.
  • Putnam, Ruth Anna, 2000. “Warum keine feministische Theorie der Gerechtigkeit?” Veit Friemert (trans.), in Deutsche Zeitschrift fuer Philosophie, 48(2): 171–206.
  • Russell, J. S., 1995. “Okin's Rawlsian Feminism? Justice in the Family and Another Liberalism,” Social Theory and Practice, 21(3): 397–426.
  • Sehon, Scott, 1996. “Okin on Feminism and Rawls,” Philosophical Forum, 27(4): 321–332.
  • Shaw, Beverly, 1984. “Sexual Justice and the Sceptical Feminist,” Journal of Applied Philosophy, 1: 115–122.
  • Smith, Andrew F., 2004. “Closer but Still No Cigar: On the Inadequacy of Rawls's Reply to Okin's Political Liberalism, Justice, and Gender,” in Social Theory and Practice: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal of Social Philosophy, 30(1): 59–71.
  • Thompson, Janna, 1993. “What Do Women Want? Rewriting the Social Contract,” International Journal of Moral and Social Studies, 8(3): 257–272.

Richard Rorty

Books

  • Fraser, Nancy, 1989. Unruly Practices: Power, Discourse, and Gender in Contemporary Social Theory, Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.
  • Olthius, James H. (ed.), 1997. Knowing Other-Wise: Philosophy at the Threshold of Spirituality, New York: Fordham University Press.
  • Rothleder, Dianne, 1999. The Work of Friendship: Rorty, His Critics, and the Project of Solidarity, Albany: SUNY Press.

Articles

  • Amoros, Celia, 1997. “Richard Rorty and the ‘Tricoteuses,’” Constellations, 3(3): 364–376.
  • Amoros, Celia, 2002. “Movimentos feministas y resignificaciones linguisticas,” in Quaderns de Filosofia i Ciencia, 30–31: 7–21.
  • Fraser, Nancy, 1988. “Solidarity or Singularity? Richard Rorty Between Romanticism and Technocracy,” Praxis International, 8: 257–272.
  • Fritzman, J. M., 1993. “Thinking With Fraser About Rorty, Feminism, and Pragmatism,” Praxis International, 13(2): 113–125.
  • Kaufman-Osborn, Timothy W., 1993. “Teasing Feminist Sense From Experience,” Hypatia, 8(2): 124–144.
  • Leland, Dorothy, 1988. “Rorty on the Moral Concern Philosophy: A Critique Froma Feminist Point of View,” Praxis International, 8: 273–283.
  • Putnam, Ruth Anna, 2000. “Democracy without Foundations,” in Ethics: An International Journal of Social, Political, and Legal Philosophy, 110(2): 388–404.
  • Renegard, Valerie R. and Stacey K. Sowards, 2003. “Liberal Irony, Rhetoric, and Feminist Thought: A Unifying Third Wave Feminist Theory,” in Philosophy and Rhetoric, 36(4): 330–352.
  • Rorty, Richard, 1991. “Feminism and Pragmatism,” Michigan Quarterly Review, 30(2): 231–58
  • Schultz, Bart, 1999. “Comment: The Private and Its Problems--Pragmatism, Pragmatic Feminism, and Homophobia,” Philosophy of the Social Sciences, 29(2): 281–305
  • Skillen, Tony, 1992. “Reply to Richard Rorty's ‘Feminism and Pragmatism’: Richard Rorty--Knight Errant,” Radical Philosophy, 62: 24–26.
  • Wilson, Catherine, 1992. “Reply to Richard Rorty's ‘Feminism and Pragmatism’: How Did the Dinosaurs Die Out? How Did the Poets Survive?” Radical Philosophy, 62: 20–23.

Bertrand Russell

Articles

  • Harrison, Brian, 1984. “Bertrand Russell: The False Consciousness of a Feminist,” Russell, 4: 157–206.
  • Martin, Bill, 1989. “’To the Lighthouse’ and the Feminist Path to Posmodernity,” Philosophy and Literature, 13: 307–315.
  • Tait, Katharine, 1978. “Russell and Feminism,” Russell, 29: 5–16.

Alfred North Whitehead

Books

  • Davaney, Sheila Greeve (ed.), 1981. Feminism and Process Thought, New York: Mellen Press.

Articles

  • Cobb, John Jr., 1991. “Whiteheadian Thought,” Dialogue and Humanism, 1(2): 79–91.
  • Havell, Nancy R., 1988. “The Promise of a Process Feminist Theory of Relations,” Process Studies, 17: 78–87.
  • Morgan, Kathryn Pauly, 2002. “Desperately Seeking Evelyn, or, Alternatively, Exploring Pedagogies of the Personal in Alfred North Whitehead and Feminist Theory,” in Philosophy of Education, 369–377.
  • Stengel, Barbara S., 2002. “Why Whitehead? Toward a Pedagogy of the Truly Personal,” in Philosophy of Education, 378–381.
  • Thie, Marilyn, 1978. “Feminist Concerns and Whitehead's Theory of Perception,” Process Studies, 8: 186–191.
  • Ulshofer, Gotlind B., 2000. “A Whiteheadian Business Ethics and the Western Hemisphere,” in Journal of Business Ethics, 23(1): 67–71.
  • Wang, Zhihe, 2002. “What Can Whitehead's Philosophy Contribute to Feminism?” in Process Studies, 31(2): 125–137.

Ludwig Wittgenstein

Books

  • Scheman, Naomi and Peg O'Connor (eds.), 2002. Feminist Interpretations of Ludwig Wittgenstein, University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.

Articles

  • Baker, Nancy E., 2002. “Wittgenstein, Feminism, and the Exclusions of Philosophy,” in Feminist Interpretations of Ludwig Wittgenstein, Naomi Scheman and Peg O'Connor (eds.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 48–64.
  • Bhushan, Nalini, 2002. “Eleanor Rosch and the Development of Successive Wittgensteinian Paradigms for Cognitive Science,” in Feminist Interpretations of Ludwig Wittgenstein, Naomi Scheman and Peg O'Connor (eds.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 259–283.
  • Braaten, Jane, 2002. “The Short Life of Meaning: Feminism and Nonliteralism,” in Feminist Interpretations of Ludwig Wittgenstein, Naomi Scheman and Peg O'Connor (eds.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 176–192.
  • Bradford, Judith, 2002. “Words and Worlds: Some Thoughts on the Significance of Wittgenstein for Moral and Political Philosophy,” in Feminist Interpretations of Ludwig Wittgenstein, Naomi Scheman and Peg O'Connor (eds.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 287–304.
  • Caraway, Carol, 2002. “Kritika, kontekst I zajednica: Veze izmedu Wittgensteinova spisa o izvjesnosti I feministicke epistemologije,” Kristijan Krkac (trans.), in Prolegomena: Casopis za filozofiju, 1(2): 155–162.
  • Cavell, Stanley, 2000. “Beginning to Read Barbara Cassin,” in Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy, 15(40): 99–101.
  • Churchill, Sandra W., 2002. “Big Dogs, Little Dogs, Universal Dogs: Ludwig Wittgenstein and Patricia Williams Talk About the Logic of Conceptual Rearing,” in Feminist Interpretations of Ludwig Wittgenstein, Naomi Scheman and Peg O'Connor (eds.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 305–321.
  • Cohen, Daniel, 2002. “Tractatio Logico-Philosophica: Engendering Wittgenstein's Tractatus” in Feminist Interpretations of Ludwig Wittgenstein, Naomi Scheman and Peg O'Connor (eds.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 138–158.
  • Craker, Tim, 2002. “Speaking Philosophy in the Voice of Another: Wittgenstein, Irigaray, and the Inheritance of Mimesis,” in Feminist Interpretations of Ludwig Wittgenstein, Naomi Scheman and Peg O'Connor (eds.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 65–94.
  • Crary, Alice, 2002. “What Do Feminists Want in an Epistemology?” in Feminist Interpretations of Ludwig Wittgenstein, Naomi Scheman and Peg O'Connor (eds.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 97–118.
  • Davidson, Joyce and Mick Smith, 1999. “Wittgenstein and Irigaray: Gender and Philosophy in a Language (Game) of Difference,” in Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy, 14(20): 72–96.
  • Duran, Jane, 2002. “Wittgenstein, Feminism and Theory,” in Philosophy and Social Criticism, 28(3): 321–336.
  • Garavaso, Pieranna, 1999. “The Quine/Wittgenstein Controversy: Any Role for Feminist Empiricism in It?” in Epistemologia: Rivista Italiana di Filosofia della Scienza, 22(1): 63–90.
  • Hekman, Susan, 2002. “The Moral Language Game,” in Feminist Interpretations of Ludwig Wittgenstein, Naomi Scheman and Peg O'Connor (eds.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 159–175.
  • Heyes, Cressida J., 2002. “‘Back to the Rough Ground’: Wittgenstein, Essentialism, and Feminist Methods,” in Feminist Interpretations of Ludwig Wittgenstein, Naomi Scheman and Peg O'Connor (eds.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 195–212.
  • Hoagland, Sarah Lucia, 2002. “Making Mistakes, Rendering Nonsence, and Moving Toward Uncertainty,” in Feminist Interpretations of Ludwig Wittgenstein, Naomi Scheman and Peg O'Connor (eds.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 119–137.
  • Hekman, Susan J., 1999. “Backgrounds and Riverbeds: Feminist Reflections,” in Feminist Studies, 25(2): 427–448.
  • Koggel, Christine M., 2002. “Using Wittgensteinian Methodology to Elucidate the Meaning of ‘Equality,’” in Feminist Interpretations of Ludwig Wittgenstein, Naomi Scheman and Peg O'Connor (eds.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 235–258.
  • Krajewski, Bruce, 2002. “Wittgenstein's Remarks on Colour as Remarks on Racism,” in Feminist Interpretations of Ludwig Wittgenstein, Naomi Scheman and Peg O'Connor (eds.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 389–407.
  • Lampshire, Wendy Lee, 1995. “Decisions of Identity: Feminist Subjects and Grammars of Sexuality,” Hypatia, 10(4): 32–45.
  • Lampshire, Wendy Lee, 1991. “History as Genealogy: Wittgenstein and the Feminist Deconstruction of Objectivity,” Philosophy and Theology, 313–331.
  • Lampshire, Wendy Lee, 1995. “Women--Animals--Machines: A Grammar for a Wittgensteinian Ecofeminism,” Journal of Value Inquiry, 29(1): 89–101.
  • Lee, Wendy Lynne, 2002. “Wittgensteinian Vision(s) and ‘Passionate Detachments’: A Queer Context for a Situated Episteme,” in Feminist Interpretations of Ludwig Wittgenstein, Naomi Scheman and Peg O'Connor (eds.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 367–388.
  • Lee-Lampshire, Wendy, 1999. “The Sound of Little Hummingbird Wings: A Wittgensteinian Investigation of Forms of Life as Forms of Power,” in Feminist Studies, 25(2): 409–426.
  • Lee-Lampshire, Wendy, 1999. “Spilling All Over the Wide Fields of Our Passions: Frye, Butler, Wittgenstein and the Context(s) of Attention, Intention and Identity (Or: From Arm Wrestling Duck to Abject Being to Lesbian Feminist),” in Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy, 14(3): 1–16.
  • Martin, Bill, 1989. “’To the Lighthouse’ and the Feminist Path to Postmodernity,” Philosophy and Literature, 13: 307–315.
  • McMahon, Melissa, 2000. “Antonia Soulez: An Introduction” in Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy, 15(4) (Fall). 121–126.
  • Medina, Josa, 2005. “The Meanings of Silence: Wittgensteinian Contextualism and Polyphony,” in Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy, 47(6): 562–579.
  • Nelson, Hilde Lindemann, 2002. “Wittgenstein Meets ‘Woman’ in the Language-Game of Theorizing Feminism,” in Feminist Interpretations of Ludwig Wittgenstein, Naomi Scheman and Peg O'Connor (eds.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 213–234.
  • O'Connor, Peg, 2002. “Moving to New Boroughs: Transforming the World by Inventing Language Games,” in Feminist Interpretations of Ludwig Wittgenstein, Naomi Scheman and Peg O'Connor (eds.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 432–449.
  • Orr, Deborah, 1995. “On Logic and Moral Voice,” Informal Logic, 17(3): 347–363.
  • Orr, Deborah, 2002. “Developing Wittgenstein's Picture of the Soul: Toward a Feminist Spiritual Erotics,” in Feminist Interpretations of Ludwig Wittgenstein, Naomi Scheman and Peg O'Connor (eds.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 322–343.
  • Read, Rupert, 2002. “Culture, Nature, Ecosystem (or Why Nature Can't Be Naturalized),” in Feminist Interpretations of Ludwig Wittgenstein, Naomi Scheman and Peg O'Connor (eds.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 408–431.
  • Rooney, Phyllis, 2002. “Philosophy, Language, and Wizardry,” in Feminist Interpretations of Ludwig Wittgenstein, Naomi Scheman and Peg O'Connor (eds.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 25–47.
  • Scheman, Naomi, 2002. “Introduction,” in Feminist Interpretations of Ludwig Wittgenstein, Naomi Scheman and Peg O'Connor (eds.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 1–21.
  • Smith, Janet Farrell, 2002. “‘No Master, Outside or In’: Wittgenstein's Critique of the Proprietary Subject,” in Feminist Interpretations of Ludwig Wittgenstein, Naomi Scheman and Peg O'Connor (eds.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 344–364.
  • Soulez, Antonia, 2000. “Conversion on Philosophy: Wittgenstein's Saving Word,” in Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy, 15(4): 127–150.
  • Tanesini, Alessandro, 2005. “Wittgenstein: A Feminist Interpretation,” in Radical Philosophy: A Journal of Socialist and Feminist Philosophy, 130(March-April).
  • Zerilli, Linda M.G., 1998. “Doing without Knowing: Feminism's Politics of the Ordinary,” in Political Theory: An International Journal of Political Philosophy, 26(4): 435–458.

Other Twentieth Century Philosophy

Books

  • Benstock, Shari (ed.), 1987. Feminist Issues in Literary Scholarship, Bloomington: Indiana University Press.

Articles

  • Cocks, Joan, 1990. “Cultural Theory Looks at Identity and Contradiction,” Quest, 38–60.
  • Hall, Diana Long, 1976. “Biology, Sex Hormones, and Sexism in the 1920s,” in Women and Philosophy: Toward a Theory of Liberation, Carol C. Gould and Marx W. Wartofsky (eds.), New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons.
  • Melander, Ellinor, 1992. “Toward the Sexual and Economic Emancipation of Women: The Philosophy of Grete Meisel-Hess,” History of European Ideas, 14(5): 695–713.
  • Pakszys, Elzbieta, 1998. “Women, Women's Issues, and Feminism in Polish Philosophy,” in Philosophy in Post-Communist Europe, Dane R. Gordon (ed.), Amsterdam: Rodopi.
  • Sarvasy, Wendy, 1997. “Social Citizenship From a Feminist Perspective,” Hypatia, 12(4): 54–73.
  • Wosk, Julie, 1993. “The ‘Electric Eve’: Galvanizing Women in Nineteenth and Twentieth Century Art and Technology,” Research in Philosophy and Technology, 13: 43–56.

Topics — Pragmatism

Books

  • Seigfried, Charlene Haddock, 1996. Pragmatism and Feminism: Reweaving the Social Fabric, Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
  • Sullivan, Shannon, 2001. Living Across and Through Skins: Transactional Bodies, Pragmatism, and Feminism, Bloomington: Indiana University Press.

Articles

  • Code, Lorraine, 1998. “Feminists and Pragmatists: A Radical Future?” in Radical Philosophy: A Journal of Socialist and Feminist Philosophy, 87(January-February): 22–30.
  • Colapietro, Vincent, 2002. “Love and Death—and Other Somatic Transactions,” in Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy, 17(4): 163–172.
  • Deegan, Mary Jo, 2001. “The Ecofeminist Pragmatism of Charlotte Perkins Gilman,” in Environmental Ethics: An Interdisciplinary Journal Dedicated to the Philosophical Aspects of Environmental Problems, 23(1): 16–36.
  • Doak, Mary, 2003. “Feminism, Pragmatism, and Utopia: A Catholic Theological Response,” in American Journal of Theology and Philosophy, 24(1): 22–39.
  • Keith, Heather E., 1999. “Feminism and Pragmatism: George Herbert Mead's Ethics of Care,” in Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society: A Quarterly Journal in American Philosophy, 35(2): 328–344.
  • Keith, Heather E., 2001. “Pornography Contextualized: A Test Case for a Feminist-Pragmatist Ethics,” in Journal of Speculative Philosophy: A Quarterly Journal of History, Criticism, and Imagination, 15(2): 122–136.
  • Knight Abowitz, Kathleen, 1999. “Reclaiming Community,” in Educational Theory, 49(2): 143–159.
  • MacMullan, Terrance, 2001. “On War as Waste: Jane Addams' Pragmatic Pacifism,” in Journal of Speculative Philosophy: A Quarterly Journal of History, Criticism, and Imagination, 15(2): 86–104.
  • Mahowald, Mary Briody, 1997. “What Classical American Philosophers Missed: Jane Addams, Critical Pragmatism, and Cultural Feminism,” Journal of Value Inquiry, 31(1): 39–54.
  • McKenna, Erin, 2003. “Pragmatism and Feminism: Engaged Philosophy,” in American Journal of Theology and Philosophy, 24(1): 3–21.
  • McReynolds, Phillip, 2002. “Nussbaum's Capabilities Approach: A Pragmatist Critique,” in Journal of Speculative Philosophy: A Quarterly Journal of History, Criticism, and Imagination, 16(2): 142–150.
  • Mesle, Barbara Hiles and C. Robert Mesle, 2003. “Tangled, Muddy, Painful, and Perplexed: Pragmatism, Feminism, and Life,” in American Journal of Theology and Philosophy, 24(1): 80–99.
  • Miller, Marjorie C., 1992. “Feminism and Pragmatism,” Monist, 75(4): 445–457
  • Miller, Marjorie C., 1991. “Response to Eugenie Gatens-Robinson, Marcia K. Moen, and Felicia E. Kruse,” Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society, 465–474.
  • Nelson, Julie A., 2001. “Value as Rationality: Feminist, Pragmatist, and Process Thought Meet Economics,” in Journal of Speculative Philosophy: A Quarterly Journal of History, Criticism, and Imagination, 15(20): 137–151.
  • Rooney, Phyllis, 1993. “Feminist-Pragmatist Revisionings of Reason, Knowledge, and Philosophy,” Hypatia, 8(2): 15–37.
  • Schultz, Bart, 1999. “Comment: The Private and Its Problems—Pragmatism, Pragmatist Feminism, and Homophobia,” in Philosophy of the Social Sciences, 29(2): 281–305.
  • Seigfried, Charlene Haddock, 1991. “The Missing Perspective: Feminist Pragmatism,” Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society, 329–337.
  • Seigfried, Charlene Haddock, 1998. “Pragmatism,” in A Companion to Feminist Philosophy, Alison M. Jaggar (ed.), Cambridge: Blackwell.
  • Seigfried, Charlene Haddock, 2001. “Can a Man-Hating Feminist Also Be a Pragmatist?: On Charlotte Perkins Gilman,” in Journal of Speculative Philosophy: A Quarterly Journal of History, Criticism, and Imagination, 15(2): 74–85.
  • Siegfried, Charlene Haddock, 1998. “Perspectives on Pragmatism: A Reply to Lorraine Code,” in Radical Philosophy: A Journal of Socialist and Feminist Philosophy, 92(November-December): 25–27.
  • Seigfried, Charlene Haddock, 2002. “Shedding Skins,” in Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy, 17(4): 173–186.
  • Seigfried, Charlene Haddock, 1999. “Socializing Democracy: Jane Addams and John Dewey,” in Philosophy of the Social Sciences, 29(2): 207–230.
  • Stone, Lynda, 1999. “Experience and Performance: Contrasting ‘Identity’ in Feminist Theorizings,” in Studies in Philosophy and Education, 18(5): 327–337.
  • Sullivan, Shannon, 2002. “Pragmatist Feminism As Ecological Ontology: Reflections on Living Across and Through Skins,” in Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy, 17(4): 201–217.
  • Sullivan, Shannon, 2003. “Reciprocal Relations between Races: Jane Addams' Ambiguous Legacy,” in Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society: A Quarterly Journal in American Philosophy, 39(1): 43–60.
  • Thayer-Bacon, Barbara, 2003. “Pragmatism and Feminism as Qualified Relativism,” Studies in Philosophy and Education, 22(6): 417–438.
  • Wagoner, Zandra, 2003. “A Pragmatic Feminist Ethic of Conflict,” in American Journal of Theology and Philosophy, 24(1): 61–79.
  • Whipps, Judy D., 2004. “Jane Addams' Social Thought as a Model for a Pragmatist-Feminist Communitarianism,” in Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy, 19(2): 118–133.

Twentieth Century Contintental Philosophy

Hannah Arendt

Books

  • Bar On, Bat-Ami, 2002. The Subject of Violence: Arendtian Exercises in Understanding, Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield.
  • Bickford, Susan, 1996. The Dissonance of Democracy: Listening, Conflict, and Citizenship, Ithaca: Cornell University Press.
  • Disch, Lisa J., 1994. Hannah Arendt and the Limits of Philosophy: With a New Preface, Ithaca: Cornell University Press.
  • Honig, Bonnie (ed.), 1995. Feminist Interpretations of Hannah Arendt, University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.
  • Hutchings, Kimberly, 1996. Kant, Critique, and Politics, New York: Routledge.

Articles

  • Adams, Katherine, 2002. “At the Table with Arendt: Toward a Self-Interested Practice of Coalition Discourse,” in Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy, 17(1): 1–33.
  • Allen, Amy, 1999. “Solidarity After Identity Politics: Hannah Arendt and the Power of Feminist Theory,” Philosophy and Social Criticism, 25(1): 97–118.
  • Benhabib, Seyla, 1993. “Feminist Theory and Hannah Arendt's Concept of Public Space,” History of the Human Sciences, 6(2): 97–114.
  • Benhabib, Seyla, 1995. “The Pariah and Her Shadow: Hannah Arendt's Biography of Biography of Rahel Varnhagen,” in Feminist Interpretations of Hannah Arendt, Bonnie Honig (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 83–104.
  • Bickford, Susan, 1995. “In the Presence of Others: Arendt and Anzaldua on the Paradox of Public Appearance,” in Feminist Interpretations of Hannah Arendt, Bonnie Honig (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 313–336.
  • Birmingham, Peg, 2003. “Holes of Oblivion: The Banality of Radical Evil,” in Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy, 18(1): 80–103.
  • Blattner, Sidonia and Irene M. Marti, 2005. “Rosa Luxemburg and Hannah Arendt: Against the Destruction of Political Spheres of Freedom,” Senem Saner (trans.), in Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy, 20(2): 88–101.
  • Cavarero, Adriana, 2003. “Review of Dietz and Bar On,” in Political Theory: An International Journal of Political Philosophy, 31(6): 852–858.
  • Cocks, Joan, 1995. “On Nationalism: Frantz Fanon, 1925–1961; Rosa Luxemburg, 1871–1919; and Hannah Arendt, 1906–1975,” in Feminist Interpretations of Hannah Arendt, Bonnie Honig (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 221–246.
  • Comesana-Santalices, Gloria M., 2001. “Lectura feminista de alguna textos de Hannah Arendt,” in Anales del Seminario de Historia de la Filosofia, 18: 125–142.
  • Cutting Gray, Joanne, 1996. “Hannah Arendt, Feminism, and the Politics of Alterity: ‘What Will We Lose if We Win,’” in Hypatia's Daughters: Fifteen Hundred Years of Women Philosophers, Linda Lopez McAlister (ed.), Bloomington: Indiana University Press.
  • Dietz, Mary G., 1995. “Feminist Receptions of Hannah Arendt,” in Feminist Interpretations of Hannah Arendt, Bonnie Honig (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 17–50.
  • Dietz, Mary G., 2003. “Turning Operations: Feminism, Arendt and Politics,” in Political Theory: An International Journal of Political Philosophy, 31(6).
  • Disch, Lisa J., 1995. “On Friendship in ‘Dark Times,’” in Feminist Interpretations of Hannah Arendt, Bonnie Honig (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 285–312.
  • Duhan, Laura, 1990. “Feminism and Peace Theory: Women as Nurturers versus Women as Public Citizens,” in In the Interest of Peace: A Spectrum of Philosophical Views, Wolfeboro: Longwood.
  • Elshtain, Jean Bethke, 1995. “Political Children,” in Feminist Interpretations of Hannah Arendt, Bonnie Honig (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 263–284.
  • Franco, Vittoria, 1995. “Agnes Heller, una vita per l'autonomia e la liberta,” Iride, 8(16): 544–602 (Italian).
  • Geddes, Jennifer L., 2003. “Banal Evil and Useless Knowledge: Hannah Arendt and Charlotte Delbo on Evil after the Holocaust,” in Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy, 18(1): 104–115.
  • Guerra Palmero, Maria Jose, 1999. “Mujer, identidad y espacio publico,” in Contrastes: Revista Interdisciplinar de Filosofia, 4: 45–64.
  • Honig, Bonnie, 1995. “Introduction: The Arendt Question in Feminism,” in Feminist Interpretations of Hannah Arendt, Bonnie Honig (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 1–16.
  • Honig, Bonnie, 1995. “Toward an Agonistic Feminism: Hannah Arendt and the Politics of Identity,” in Feminist Interpretations of Hannah Arendt, Bonnie Honig (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 135–166.
  • Kaplan, Morris B., 1995. “Refiguring the Jewish Question: Arendt, Proust, and the Politics of Sexuality,” in Feminist Interpretations of Hannah Arendt, Bonnie Honig (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 105–134.
  • Klawiter, Maren, 1990. “Using Arendt and Heidegger to Consider Feminist Thinking on Women and Reproductive/Infertility Technologies,” Hypatia, 65–89.
  • Landes, Joan B., 1995. “Novus Ordo Saeclorum: Gender and Public Space in Arendt's Revolutionary France,” in Feminist Interpretations of Hannah Arendt, Bonnie Honig (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 195–220.
  • Lenz, Claudia, 2005. “The End or the Apotheosis of Labor? Hannah Arendt's Contribution to the Question of the Good Life in Times of Global Superfluity of Human Labor Power,” Gertrude Postl (trans.), in  Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy, 20(2): 135–154.
  • Long, Christopher Philip, 1998. “A Fissure in the Distinction: Hannah Arendt, the Family, and the Public/Private Dichotomy,” Philosophy and Social Criticism, 24(5): 85–104.
  • MacCannell, Juliet Flower, 1993. “Facing Fascism: A Feminine Politics of Jouissance,” Topoi, 12(2): 137–151.
  • Mann, Patricia S., 1998. “Toward a Postpatriarchal Society,” in Norms and Values: Essays on the Work of Virginia Held, Joram Graf Haber (ed.), Lanham: Rowman and Littlefield.
  • Maso, Anna, 2002. “La fugitive de Egipto y Palestina,” in Daimon, Revista de Filosofia, 26(May-August): 43–56.
  • McAfee, Noelle, 2004. “The Ends of Arendtian Politics: A Review of Hannah Arendt by Julia Kristeva; Speaking through the Mask: Hannah Arendt and the Politics of Social Identity by Norma Claire Moruzzi; and Our Sense of the Real: Aesthetic Experience and Arendtian Politics by Kimberly Curtis,” in Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy, 19(4): 223–231.
  • Meehan, Johanna, 2004. “Review Essay: Feminism, Critical Theory, and Power,” in Philosophy and Social Criticism, 30(3): 375–382.
  • Minnich, Elizabeth Kamarck, 2003. “Thinking Friends, Moral Taste, Public Concerns: For Sara Ruddick,” in Newsletter on Feminism and Philosophy (American Philosophical Association Newsletters), Sally Scholz (ed.), 03(1): 94–97.
  • Moynagh, Patricia, 1997. “A Politics of Enlarged Mentality: Hannah Arendt, Citizenship Responsibility, and Feminism,” Hypatia, 12(4): 27–53.
  • Norton, Anne, 1995. “Heart of Darkness: African and African Americans in the Writings of Hannah Arendt,” in Feminist Interpretations of Hannah Arendt, Bonnie Honig (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 247–262.
  • Nye, Andrea, 1996. “Friendship Across Generations,” Hypatia, 11(3): 154–160.
  • O'Byrne, Anne, 2004. “Symbol, Exchange and Birth: Towards a Theory of Labour and Relation,” in Philosophy and Social Criticism, 30(3): 355–373.
  • Orlie, Melissa A., 1995. “Forgiving Trespasses, Promising Futures,” in Feminist Interpretations of Hannah Arendt, Bonnie Honig (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 337–356.
  • Phillips, Anne, 2000. “Feminism and Republicanism: Is This a Plausible Alliance?” in Journal of Political Philosophy, 8(2): 279–293.
  • Pitkin, Hanna Fenichel, 1995. “Conformism, Housekeeping, and the Attack of the Blob: The Origins of Hannah Arendt's Concept of the Social,” in Feminist Interpretations of Hannah Arendt, Bonnie Honig (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 51–82.
  • Winant, Terry, 1987. “The Feminist Standpoint: A Matter of Language,” Hypatia, 2: 123–148.
  • Young-Bruehl, Elisabeth, 1996. “Hannah Arendt Among Feminists,” in Hannah Arendt: Twenty Years Later, Larry May (ed.), Cambridge: MIT Press.
  • Zerilli, Linda M.G., 1995. “The Arendtian Body,” in Feminist Interpretations of Hannah Arendt, Bonnie Honig (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 167–194.

Simone de Beauvoir

Books

  • Ascher, Carole, 1981. Simone de Beauvoir: A Life of Freedom, Brighton: Harvester Press.
  • Bauer, Nancy, 2001. Simone de Beauvoir, Philosophy and Feminism, New York: Columbia University Press.
  • Bergoffen, Debra B., 1997. The Philosophy of Simone de Beauvoir: Gendered Phenomenologies, Erotic Generosities, Albany: SUNY Press.
  • Bieber, Konrad, 1979. Simone de Beauvoir, Boston: Hall.
  • Card, Claudia (ed.), 2003. The Cambridge Companion to Simone de Beauvoir, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Easlea, B., 1981. Science and Sexual Oppression, London: Weidenfeld & Nicholson.
  • Fallaize, Elizabeth (ed.), 1998. Simone de Beauvoir: A Critical Reader, New York: Routledge.
  • Fullbrook, Edward and Kate Fullbrook, 1998. Simone de Beauvoir: A Critical Introduction, Cambridge: Polity Press and Malden MA: Blackwell.
  • Keefe, Terry, 1983. Simone de Beauvoir: A Study of Her Writings, Totowa: Barnes and Noble.
  • Moi, Toril, 1994. Simone de Beauvoir: The Making of an Intellectual Woman, Cambridge: Blackwell.
  • Nordquist, Joan, 1991. Social Theory: A Bibliographic Series, No. 23--Simone de Beauvoir: A Bibliography, Santa Cruz: Reference and Research.
  • O'Brien, Wendy and Lester Embree (eds.), 2001. The Existential Phenomenology of Simone de Beauvoir, Dordrecht and Boston: Kluwer Academic Publishers.
  • Okely, Judith, 1986. Simone de Beauvoir, New York: Pantheon.
  • Pilardi, Jo-Ann, 1999. Simone de Beauvoir Writing the Self: Philosophy Becomes Autobiography, Westport CT: Greenwood Press.
  • Richards, Janet Radcliffe, 1980. The Sceptical Feminist: A Philosophical Inquiry, Boston: Routledge and K. Paul.
  • Sabrosky, Judith A., 1979. From Rationality to Liberation, Westport: Greenwood Press.
  • Savage Brosman, Catharine, 1991. Simone de Beauvoir Revisited, Boston: Twayne.
  • Simons, Margaret A. (ed.), 1995. Feminist Interpretations of Simone de Beauvoir, University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.
  • Simons, Margaret A., 1999. Beauvoir and The Second Sex: Feminism, Race, and the Origins of Existentialism, Lanham MD: Rowman and Littlefield.
  • Wenzel, Helene Vivienne (ed.), 1986. Simone de Beauvoir: Witness to a Century, New Haven: Yale University Press.

Articles

  • Adan, Carme, 1999. “Entre a modernidade e a posmodernidade: Simone de Beauvoir,” in Agora: Papeles de Filosofia, 18(2): 65–82.
  • Alexander, Anna, 1997. “The Eclipse of Gender: Simone de Beauvoir and the ‘Differance’ of Translation,” Philosophy Today, 41(1–4): 112–120.
  • Alexander, Anna, 2003. “Outside The Second Dex: Beauvoir's pensee du dehors,” in Bulletin de la Societe Americaine de Philosophie de Langue Francaise, 13(1): 94–127.
  • Allen, Jeffner, 1995. “A Response to a Letter from Peg Simons, December 1993,” in Feminist Interpretations of Simone de Beauvoir, Margaret A. Simons (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.
  • Amoros, Celia, 1999. “Politica del reconocimiento y colectivos bi-valentes,” in Logos: Anales del Seminario de Metafisica, 1–2: 39–56.
  • Andrew, Barbara S., 1998. “Care, Freedom, and Reciprocity in the Ethics of Simone de Beauvoir,” in Philosophy Today, 42(3): 290–300.
  • Arp, Kristana, 1995. “Beauvoir's Concept of Bodily Alienation,” in Feminist Interpretations of Simone de Beauvoir, Margaret A. Simons (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.
  • Arp, Kristana, 1999. “Conceptions of Freedom in Beauvoir's The Ethics of Ambiguity,” in International Studies in Philosophy, 31(2): 25–34.
  • Barber, Michael D., 1998. “Autobiography: Precarious Totality,” in Alfred Schutz's ‘Sociological Aspect of Literature, Lester Embree (ed.), Dordrecht: Kluwer.
  • Barnes, Hazel, 1998. “Self-Encounter in She Came to Stay,” in Simone de Beauvoir: A Critical Reader, Elizabeth Fallaize (ed.), New York: Routledge, 157–170.
  • Bauer, Nancy, 2001. “Being-with As Being-Against: Heidegger Meets Hegel in The Second Sex,” in Continental Philosophy Review, 34(2): 129–149.
  • Bergoffen, Debra B., 1996. “From Husserl to de Beauvoir: Gendering the Perceived Subject,” Metaphilosophy, 27(1–2): 53–62.
  • Bergoffen, Debra B., 1992. “The Look as Bad Faith,” Philosophy Today, 36(3): 221–227.
  • Bergoffen, Debra B., 1995. “Out From Under: Beauvoir's Philosophy of the Erotic,” in Feminist Interpretations of Simone de Beauvoir, Margaret A. Simons (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.
  • Bergoffen, Debra B., 1999. “Marriage, Autonomy, and the Feminine Protest,” in Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy, 14(4): 18–35.
  • Bergoffen, Debra B., 2001. “Menage a trois: Freud, Beauvoir, and the Marquis de Sade,” in Continental Philosophy Review, 34(2): 151–163.
  • Bergoffen, Debra B., 2002. “Simone de Beauvoir and Jean-Paul Sartre: Woman, Man, and the Desire to Be God,” in Constellations: An International Journal of Critical and Democratic Theory, 9(3): 409–418.
  • Bordo, Susan, 1996. “The Feminist as Other,” Metaphilosophy, 27(1–2): 10–27.
  • Butler, Judith, 1984. “Gendering the Body: Beauvoir's Philosophical Contribution,” in Beyond Domination: New Perspectives on Women and Philosophy, Carol Gould (ed.), Totowa NJ: Rowman & Allanheld.
  • Butler, Judith, 1998. “Sex and Gender in Simone de Beauvoir's Second Sex,” in Simone de Beauvoir: A Critical Reader, Elizabeth Fallaize (ed.), New York: Routledge, 29–42.
  • Cataldi, Sue L., 1999. “Sexuality Situated: Beauvoir on Frigidity,” in Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy, 14(4): 70–82.
  • Chanter, Tina, 2000. “Abjection and Ambiguity: Simone de Beauvoir's Legacy,” in Journal of Speculative Philosophy: A Quarterly Journal of History, Criticism, and Imagination, 14(2): 138–155.
  • Coddetta, Carolina, 1995. “The Problem of Power in the Feminist Theory,” Fronesis, 2(2): 59–95 (Spanish).
  • Comesana Santalices, Gloria M., 1989. “’El segundo sexo,’ vigentia y proyeccion,” Revista de Filosofia (Venezuela), 45–72 (Spanish).
  • Comesana-Santalices, Gloria M., 1999. “The Second Sex: Up-to-Dateness and Pertinence,” in Utopia y Praxis Latinoamerica: Revista Internacional de Filosofia Iberoamericana y teoria Social, 4(8): 27–38 (Spanish).
  • Dallery, Arleen B., 1985. “Sexual Embodiment: Beauvoir and French Feminist (‘Ecriture Feminine’),” Hypatia, WSIF 3: 197–202.
  • De Lacoste, Guillermine, 1999. “The Beauvoir and Levy Interviews: Toward a Feminine Economy,” in Feminist Interpretations of Jean-Paul Sartre, Julien S. Murphy (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 272–299.
  • Deutscher, Penelope, 1999. “Bodies, Lost and Found: Simone de Beauvoir from The Second Sex to Old Age,” in Radical Philosophy: A Journal of Socialist and Feminist Philosophy, 96(July-August): 6–16.
  • Dijkstra, Sandra, 1980. “Simone de Beauvoir and Betty Friedan,” Feminist Studies, 6: 290–303.
  • Diprose, Rosalyn, 1998. “Generosity: Between Love and Desire,” in Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy, 13(1): 1–20.
  • Duran, Jane, 2000. “The Two Simones,” in Ratio: An International Journal of Analytic Philosophy, 13(3): 201–212.
  • Dykeman, Therese B., 2001. “Simone de Beauvoir: Facilitator for Feminist Ethics,” in International Journal for Field-Being, 1 (pt. 1)/1, 13/1–6.
  • Engel, Sabine, 2003. “Reprendre Le deuxieme sexe,” in Bulletin de la Societe Americaine de Philosophie de Langue Francaise, 13(1): 1–15.
  • Fallaize, Elizabeth, 1998. “Narrative Strategies and Sexual Politics in Beauvoir's Fiction,” in Simone de Beauvoir: A Critical Reader, Elizabeth Fallaize (ed.), New York: Routledge, 193–202.
  • Fallaize, Elizabeth, 2001. “A Saraband of Imagery: The Uses of Biological Science in Le deuxieme sexe,” in The Existential Phenomenology of Simone de Beauvoir, Wendy O'Brien and Lester Embree (eds.), Dordrecht and Boston: Kluwer Academic Publishers, 67–84.
  • Farrell Smith, Janet, 1986. “Possessive Power,” Hypatia, 1: 103–120.
  • Fraser, Mariam, 2001. “Identity without Selfhood: Bisexuality and Simone de Beauvoir,” in Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy, 16(3).
  • Felstiner, Mary Lowenthal, 1980. “Seeing ‘The Second Sex’ Through the Second Wave,” Feminist Studies, 6: 247–276.
  • Ferguson, Ann, 1985. “Lesbian Identity: Beauvoir and History,” Hypatia, WSIF 3: 203–208.
  • Fraser, Miriam, 1997. “Feminism, Foucault, and Deleuze,” Theory, Culture, and Society, 14(2): 23–37.
  • Fullbrook, Kate and Edward Fullbrook, 1995. “Sartre's Secret Key,” in Feminist Interpretations of Simone de Beauvoir, Margaret A. Simons (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.
  • Fullbrook, Edward, 1999. “She Came to Stay and Being and Nothingness,” in Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy, 14(4): 50–69.
  • Fullbrook, Edward and Kate Fullbrook, 1999. “The Absence of Beauvoir,” in Feminist Interpretations of Jean-Paul Sartre, Julien S. Murphy (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 45–63.
  • Godard, Linda, 1985. “Pour une nouvelle lecture de la question de la femme: essai a partir de la pensee de Jacques Derrida,” Philosophiques, 12: 147–165 (French).
  • Gothlin, Eva, 1999. “Simone de Beauvoir's Notions of Appeal, Desire, and Ambiguity and Their Relationship to Jean-Paul Sartre's Notions of Appeal and Desire,” in Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy, 14(4): 83–95.
  • Green, Karen, 2002. “The Other As Another Other,” in Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy, 17(4): 1–15.
  • Green, Karen, 1999. “Sartre and de Beauvoir on Freedom and Oppression,” in Feminist Interpretations of Jean-Paul Sartre, Julien S. Murphy (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 175–199.
  • Hatcher, Donald L., 1989. “Existential Ethics and Why It's Immoral to be a Housewife,” Journal of Values Inquiry, 23: 59–68.
  • Heath, Jane, 1998. “She Came to Stay: The Phallus Strikes Back,” in Simone de Beauvoir: A Critical Reader, Elizabeth Fallaize (ed.), New York: Routledge, 171–182.
  • Heinamaa, Sara, 1999. “Simone de Beauvoir's Phenomenology of Sexual Difference,” in Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy, 14(4): 114–132.
  • Hengehold, Laura, 2002. “Anonymity Would Have Suited Me Perfectly: Simone Beauvoir on Writing as a Practice of Intimacy,” in Philosophical Forum, 33(2): 195–211.
  • Holveck, Eleanore, 1999. “The Blood of Others: A Novel Approach to The Ethics of Ambiguity,” in Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy, 14(4): 3–17.
  • Hughes, Alex, 1998. “Murdering the Mother I Memoirs of a Dutiful Daughter,” in Simone de Beauvoir: A Critical Reader, Elizabeth Fallaize (ed.), New York: Routledge, 120–131.
  • Hutchings, Kimberly, 2001. “De Beauvoir's Hegelianism: Rethinking the Second Sex,” in Radical Philosophy: A Journal of Socialist and Feminist Philosophy, 107(May-June): 21–31.
  • Hollywood, Amy M., 1994. “Beauvoir, Irigaray, and the Mystical,” Hypatia, 9,(4): 158–185.
  • Holveck, Eleanore, 1995. “Can a Woman Be a Philosopher? Reflections of a Beauvoirian Housemaid,” in Feminist Interpretations of Simone de Beauvoir, Margaret A. Simons (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.
  • Idt, Genevieve, 1991. “Simone de Beauvoir's Adieux: A Funeral Rite and a Literary Challenge,” in Sartre Alive Ronald Aronson (ed.), Detroit: Wayne State University Press.
  • Jeanson, Francis, 1998. “The Father in Memoirs of a Dutiful Daughter,” in Simone de Beauvoir: A Critical Reader, Elizabeth Fallaize (ed.), New York: Routledge, 111–119.
  • Klaw, Barbara, 1995. “Sexuality in Beauvoir's ‘Les Mandarins,’” in Feminist Interpretations of Simone de Beauvoir, Margaret A. Simons (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.
  • Krause, Sharon, 2000. “Lady Liberty's Allure: Political Agency, Citizenship and The Second Sex,” in Philosophy and Social Criticism, 26(1): 1–24.
  • Kruks, Sonia, 1998. “Existentialism and Phenomenology,” in A Companion to Feminist Philosophy, Alison M. Jaggar (ed.), Cambridge: Blackwell.
  • Kruks, Sonia, 1995. “Simone de Beauvoir: Teaching Sartre About Freedom,” in Feminist Interpretations of Simone de Beauvoir, Margaret A. Simons (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.
  • Kruks, Sonia, 1998. “Beauvoir: The Weight of Situation,” in Simone de Beauvoir: A Critical Reader, Elizabeth Fallaize (ed.), New York: Routledge, 43–71.
  • Kruks, Sonia, 2005. “Beauvoir's Time/Our Time: The Renaissance in Simone de Beauvoir Studies,” in Feminist Studies, 31(2): 286–309.
  • Kruks, Sonia, 2005. “Simone de Beauvoir and the Politics of Privilege,” in Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy, 20(1): 178–205.
  • Kvigne, Kari and Marit Kirkevold, 2002. “A Feminist Perspective on Stroke Rehabilitation: The Relevance of de Beauvoir's Theory,” in Nursing Philosophy: A International Journal for Healthcare Professionals, 3(2): 79–89.
  • Langer, Monika, 1994. “A Philosophical retrieval of Simone de Beauvoir's ‘Pour Une Morale de l'amiguite,’” Philosophy Today, 38(2): 181–190.
  • Lazaro, Reyes, 1996. “Feminism and Motherhood: O'Brien vs. Beauvoir,” Hypatia, 1: 87–102.
  • Le Doeuff, Michele, 1979. “Operative Philosophy: Simone de Beauvoir and Existentialism,” Ideology and Consciousness, 6(Autumn): 47–58.
  • Le Doeuff, Michele, 1995. “Simone de Beauvoir: Falling into (Ambiguous) Line,” in Feminist Interpretations of Simone de Beauvoir, Margaret A. Simons (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.
  • Leon, Celine T., 1995. “Beauvoir's Woman: Eunuch or Male?” in Feminist Interpretations of Simone de Beauvoir, Margaret A. Simons (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 137–160.
  • Levaux, Michele, 1984. “Simone de Beauvoir, une feministe exceptionnelle,” Etudes, 360: 493–498 (French).
  • Linsenbard, Gail E., 1999. “Beauvoir, Ontology, and Women's Human Rights,” in Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy, 14(4): 145–162.
  • Lundgren Gothlin, Eva, 1997. “Ethics, Feminism, and Postmodernism: Seyla Benhabib and Simone de Beauvoir,” in The Postmodern Critique of the Project of the Enlightenment, Sven Eric Liedman (ed.), Amsterdam: Rodopi.
  • Lundgren Gothlin, Eva, 1994. “Simone de Beauvoir and Ethics,” History of European Ideas, 19(4–6): 899–903.
  • Lundgren-Gothlin, Eva, 1998. “The Master-Slave Dialectic in The Second Sex,” in Simone de Beauvoir: A Critical Reader, Elizabeth Fallaize (ed.), New York: Routledge, 93–108.
  • Mahowald, Mary Briody, 1992. “To be or Not to Be a Woman: Anorexia Nervosa, Normative Gender Roles, and Feminism,” Journal of Medicine and Philosophy, 17(2): 233–251.
  • Malion, Joseph, 1993. “Existentialism, Feminism, and Simone de Beauvoir,” History of European Ideas, 17(5): 651–658.
  • Marks, Elaine, 1998. “Encounters with Death in A Very Easy Death and The Body in Decline in Adieux: A Farewell to Sartre,” in Simone de Beauvoir: A Critical Reader, Elizabeth Fallaize (ed.), New York: Routledge, 132–154.
  • McCall, D. Kaufman, 1979. “Simone de Beauvoir, The Second Sex and Jean-Paul Sartre,” Signs, 5(2): 209–223.
  • Miller, Elaine P., 2000. “The Paradoxical Displacement: Beauvoir and Irigaray on Hegel's Antigone,” in Journal of Speculative Philosophy: A Quarterly Journal of History, Criticism, and Imagination, 14(2): 121–137.
  • Moi, Toril, 1998. “‘Independent Women’ and ‘Narratives of Liberation,’” in Simone de Beauvoir: A Critical Reader, Elizabeth Fallaize (ed.), New York: Routledge, 72–92.
  • Morgan, Kathryn Pauly, 1986. “Romantic Love, Altrusim, and Self-Repsect,” Hypatia, 1: 117–148.
  • Murphy, Julien, 1995. “Beauvoir and the Algerian War: Toward a Postcolonial Ethics,” in Feminist Interpretations of Simone de Beauvoir, Margaret A. Simons (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.
  • Nye, Andrea, 1986. “Preparing the Way for a Feminist Praxis,” Hypatia, 1: 101–116.
  • Okely, Judith, 1998. “Rereading The Second Sex,” in Simone de Beauvoir: A Critical Reader, Elizabeth Fallaize (ed.), New York: Routledge, 19–28.
  • Opara, Chioma, 2001. “African Feminist Thought and Beauvoirism Paradigm,” in Philosophy and Social Action, 27(3): 39–52.
  • Opher, Anne, 1998. “Mythical Discourse in ‘The Woman Destroyed,’” in Simone de Beauvoir: A Critical Reader, Elizabeth Fallaize (ed.), New York: Routledge, 183–192.
  • Pilardi, Jo Ann, 1993. “The Changing Critical Fortunes of ‘The Second Sex,’” History and Theory, 32: 51–73.
  • Pilardi, Jo-Ann, 1995. “Feminists Read The Second Sex,” in Feminist Interpretations of Simone de Beauvoir, Margaret A. Simons (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 29–44.
  • Purvis, Jennifer, 2003. “Hegelian Dimensions of The Second Sex: A Feminist Consideration,” in Bulletin de la Societe Americaine de Philosophie de Langue Francaise, 13(1): 128–156.
  • Sandford, Stella, 1999. “Contingent Ontologies: Sex, Gender and ‘Woman’ in Simone de Beauvoir and Judith Butler,”  inRadical Philosophy: A Journal of Socialist and Feminist Philosophy, 97(September-October): 18–29.
  • Scholz, Sally J., 2000. “Simone de Beauvoir on Language,” in Philosophy Today, 44(3): 211–223.
  • Scholz, Sally J., 2001. “Writing for Liberation: Simone de Beauvoir and Woman's Writing,” in Philosophy Today, 45(4): 335–348.
  • Schusterman, Richard, 2003. “Somaesthetics and The Second Sex: A Pragmatist Reading of a Feminist Classic,” in Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy, 18(4): 106–136.
  • Schutte, Ofelia,1997. “A Critique of Normative Heterosexuality: Identity, Embodiment, and Sexual Difference in Beauvoir and Irigaray,” Hypatia, 12(1): 40–62.
  • Secomb, Linnell, 1999. “Beauvoir's Minoritarian Philosophy,” in Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy, 14(4): 96–113.
  • Seigfried, Charlene Haddock, 1985. “’Second Sex’: Second Thoughts,” Hypatia, WSIF 3: 219–229.
  • Simons, Margaret A., 1998. “Beauvoir and the Roots of Radical feminism,” in Reinterpreting the Politics: Continental Philosophy and Political Theory, Lenore Langsdorf (ed.), Albany: SUNY Press.
  • Simons, Margaret A. and Jessica Benjamin, 1979. “Simone de Beauvoir: An Interview,” Feminist Studies, 5: 330–345.
  • Simons, Margaret A., 1995. “The Second Sex: From Marxism to Radical Feminism,” in Feminist Interpretations of Simone de Beauvoir, Margaret A. Simons (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.
  • Simons, Margaret A., 1990. “Sexism and the Philosophical Canon: On Reading Beauvoir's ‘The Second Sex,’” Journal of the History of Ideas, 51(3): 487–504.
  • Simons, Margaret A., 1989. “Two Interviews With Simone de Beauvoir,” Hypatia, 3: 11–27.
  • Simons, Margaret A., 2000. “Beauvoir's Philosophical Independence in a Dialogue with Sartre,” in Journal of Speculative Philosophy: A Quarterly Journal of History, Criticism, and Imagination, 14(2): 87–103.
  • Singer, Linda, 1985. “Interpretation and Retrieval: Rereading Beauvoir,” Hypatia, WSIF 3: 231–238.
  • Slattery, Patrick and Marla Morris, 1999. “Simone de Beauvoir's Ethics and Postmodern Ambiguity: The Assertion of Freedom in the Face of the Absurd,” Educational Theory, 49(1): 21–36.
  • Spelman, Elizabeth, 1982. “Women as Body: Ancient and Contemporary Views,” Feminist Studies, 8(1): 109–131.
  • Tidd, Ursula, 1999. “The Self-Other Relation in Beauvoir's Ethics and Autobiography,” in Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy, 14(4): 163–174.
  • Tirrell, Lynne, 1993. “Definition and Power: Toward Authority Without Privilege,” Hypatia, 8(4): 1–34.
  • Varikas, Eleni, 2005. “Lo que no somos: Historicidad del genero y estrategias de desidentificacion,” in Revista Internacional de Filosofia Politica, 25(July): 77–88.
  • Veltman, Andrea, 2004. “The Sisyphean Torture of Housework; Simone de Beauvoir and Inequitable Divisions of Domestic Work in Marriage,” in Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy, 19(3): 121–143.
  • Vintges, Karen, 1995. “The Second Sex and Philosophy,” in Feminist Interpretations of Simone de Beauvoir, Margaret A. Simons (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.
  • Vintges, Karen, 1995. “The Second Sex and Philosophy,” in Feminist Interpretations of Simone de Beauvoir, Margaret A. Simons (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 45–58.
  • Vintges, Karen, 1999. “Simone de Beauvoir: A Feminist Thinker for Our Times,” in Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy, 14(4): 133–144.
  • Walzer, Michael, 2002. “Simone de Beauvoir and the Adapted Woman,” in Filosoficky Casopis, 50(6): 943–961 (Czech).
  • Walsh, Sylvia, 1998. “Feminine Devotion and Self-Abandonment: Simone de Beauvoir and Soren Kierkegaard on the Woman in Love,” in Philosophy Today, 42(suppl.): 35–40.
  • Ward, Julie K., 1995. “Beauvoir's Two Sense of Body in ‘The Second Sex,’” in Feminist Interpretations of Simone de Beauvoir, Margaret A. Simons (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.
  • Ward, Julie K., 1999. “Reciprocity and Friendship in Beauvoir's Thought,” in Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy, 14(4): 36–49.
  • Young, Iris Marion, 1980. “Throwing Like a Girl: A Phenomenology of Feminine Body Comportments, Motility, and Spatiality,” Human Studies, 3: 137–156.
  • Zakin, Emily, 2000. “Differences in Equality: Beauvoir's Unsettling of the Universal,” in Journal of Speculative Philosophy: A Quarterly Journal of History, Criticism, and Imagination, 14(2): 104–120.
  • Zephyr, Jacques J., 1984. “Simone de Beauvoir et la femme,” Rev. Univ. Ottowa, 54: 37–53 (French).
  • Zerilli, Linda M. G., 1998. “Doing Without Knowing: Feminism's Politics of the Ordinary,” Political Theory, 26(4): 435–458.
  • Zerilli, Linda M.G., 1998. “Doing without Knowing: Feminism's Politics of the Ordinary,” in Political Theory: An International Journal of Political Philosophy, 26(4): 435–458.

Judith Butler

Books

  • Butler, Judith, 1990. Gender Trouble, London: Routledge 1990.

Albert Camus

Books

  • Allen, Jeffner and Iris Marion Young (eds.), 1989. The Thinking Muse: Feminism and Modern French Philosophy, Bloomington: Indiana University Press.

Articles

  • Bartlett, Elizabeth Ann, 1992. “Beyond Either/Or: Justice and Care in the Ethics of Albert Camus,” in Explorations in Feminist Ethics, Eve Browning (ed.), Bloomington: Indiana University Press.
  • Kruks, Sonia, 1998. “Existentialism and Phenomenology,” in A Companion to Feminist Philosophy, Alison M. Jaggar (ed.), Cambridge: Blackwell.

Frankfurt School (Adorno, Horkheimer, Marcuse)

Books

  • Alway, Joan, 1995. Critical Theory and Political Possibilities: Conceptions of Emancipatory Politics in the Works of Horkheimer, Adorno, Marcuse, and Habermas, Westport: Greenwood Press.
  • Holub, Renate, 1992. Antonio Gramsci: Beyond Marxism and Postmodernism, New York: Routledge.
  • Ingram, David, 1990. Critical Theory and Philosophy, New York: Paragon House.
  • Mills, Patricia Jagentoowicz, 1987. Woman, Nature, and Psyche, New Haven: Yale University Press.

Articles

  • Ryle, Martin, 1996. “Histories of Cultural Populism,” Radical Philosophy, 78: 27–33.

Theodor Adorno

Books

  • Heberle, Renee (ed.), 2006. Feminist Interpretations of Theodor Adorno, University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.

Articles

  • Apostolidis, Paul, 2006. “Negative Dialectics and Inclusive Communication,” in Feminist Interpretations of Theodor Adorno, Renee Heberle (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 233–256.
  • Caputi, Mary, 2006. “Unmarked and Unrehearsed: Theodor Adorno and the Performance Art of Cindy Sherman,” in Feminist Interpretations of Theodor Adorno, Renee Heberle (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 301–320.
  • Comay, Rebecca, 2006. “Adorno's Siren Song,” in Feminist Interpretations of Theodor Adorno, Renee Heberle (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 41–68.
  • Donovan, Josephine, 1993. “Everyday Use and Moments of Being: Toward a Nondominative Aesthetic,” in Aesthetics in Feminist Perspective, Hilde Hein (ed.), Bloomington: Indiana University Press.
  • Eagan, Jennifer L., 2006. “Unfreedom, Suffering, and the Culture Industry: What Adorno Can Contribute to a Feminist Ethics,” in Feminist Interpretations of Theodor Adorno, Renee Heberle (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 277–300.
  • Franks, Mary Anne, 2006. “An-aesthetic Theory: Adorno, Sexuality, and Memory,” in Feminist Interpretations of Theodor Adorno, Renee Heberle (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 193–216.
  • Geulen, Eva, 2006. “‘No Happiness Without Fetishism’: Minima Moralia as Ars Amandi,” in Feminist Interpretations of Theodor Adorno, Renee Heberle (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 97–112.
  • Han, Sora Y., 2006. “Intersectional Sensibility and the Shudder,” in Feminist Interpretations of Theodor Adorno, Renee Heberle (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 173–192.
  • Heberle, Renee, 2006. “Introduction: Feminism and Negative Dialectics,” in Feminist Interpretations of Theodor Adorno, Renee Heberle (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 1–20.
  • Heberle, Renee, 2006. “Living with Negative Dialectics: Feminism and the Politics of Suffering,” in Feminist Interpretations of Theodor Adorno, Renee Heberle (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 217–232.
  • Hewitt, Andrew, 2006. “A Feminine Dialectic of Enlightenment? Horkheimer and Adorno Revisited,” in Feminist Interpretations of Theodor Adorno, Renee Heberle (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 69–96.
  • Howie, Gillian, 2006. “The Economy of the Same: Identity, Equivalence, and Exploitation,” in Feminist Interpretations of Theodor Adorno, Renee Heberle (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 321–341.
  • Lee, Lisa Yun, 2006. “The Bared-Breasts Incident,” in Feminist Interpretations of Theodor Adorno, Renee Heberle (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 113–140.
  • Martin, D. Bruce, 2006. “Mimetic Moments: Adorno and Ecofeminism,” in Feminist Interpretations of Theodor Adorno, Renee Heberle (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 141–172.
  • Mullin, Amy, 2000. “Adorno, Art Theory, and Feminist Practice,” in Philosophy Today, 44(1): 16–30.
  • Phelan, Shane, 1990. “The Jargon of Authenticity: Adorno and Feminist Essentialism,” Philosophy and Social Criticism, 39–54.
  • Wilke, Sabine and Heidi Schlipphacke, 1997. “Construction of Gendered Subject: A Feminist Reading of Adorno's ‘Aesthetic Reading,’” in The Semblance of Subjectivity, Tom Huhn (ed.), Cambridge: MIT Press.
  • Zuidervaart, Lambert, 2006. “Feminist Politics and the Culture Industry: Adorno's Critique Revisited,” in Feminist Interpretations of Theodor Adorno, Renee Heberle (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 257–276.

Max Horkheimer

Articles

  • Rumpf, Mechthild, 1993. “ 'Mystical Aura': Imagination and the Reality of Maternal in Horkheimer's Writings,” in On Max Horkheimer, Seyla Benhabib (ed.), Cambridge: MIT Press.

Herbert Marcuse

Books

  • Perez Estevez, Antonio, 1989. El individuo y la feminidad, Zulia: University of Zulia, (Portugese).
  • Stevernagel, Gertrude A., 1979. Political Philosophy as Therapy: Marcuse Reconsidered, Westport: Greenwood.

Articles

  • Farganis, Sondra, 1977. “Liberty: Two Perspectives on the Women's Movement,” Ethics, 88: 62–73.

Jürgen Habermas

Books

  • Fraser, Nancy, 1989. Unruly Practices: Power, Discourse, and Gender in Contemporary Social Theory, Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.
  • Hutchings, Kimberly, 1996. Kant, Critique, and Politics, New York: Routledge.
  • Kelly, Michael (ed.), 1994. Critique and Power, Cambridge: MIT Press.

Articles

  • Allen, Amy, 2000. “Reconstruction or Deconstruction? A Reply to Johanna Meehan,” in Philosophy and Social Criticism, 26(3): 53–60.
  • Baehr, Amy R., 1996. “Toward a New Feminist Liberalism: Okin, Rawls, and Habermas,” Hypatia, 11(1): 49–66.
  • Couture, Tony, 1995. “Feminist Criticisms of Habermas' Ethics and Politics,” Dialogue, 34(2): 259–279.
  • Crocker, Nancy, 1992. “The Problem of Community,” Southwest Philosophical Studies, 19: 50–62.
  • Fleming, Marie, 1993. “Women and the ‘Public Use of Reason,’” Social Theory and Practice, 19(1): 27–50.
  • Fraser, Nancy, 1985. “Michel Foucault: A ‘Young Conservative’?” Ethics, 96: 165–184.
  • Guerra Palmero, Maria Jose, 1999. “Mujer, identidad y espacio publico,” in Contrastes: Revista Interdisciplinar de Filosofia, 4: 45–64.
  • Herrera, Maria, 1992. “Equal Respect Among Unequal Partners: Gender Difference and the Constitution of Moral Subjects,” Philosophy East and West, 42(2): 263–275.
  • Johnson, Pauline, 2001. “Distorted Communications: Feminism's Dispute with Habermas,” in Philosophy and Social Criticism, 27(1): 39–62.
  • Landes, Joan B., 1992. “Jurgen Habermas's ‘The Structural Transformation of the Public Sphere’: A Feminist Inquiry,” Praxis International, 12(1): 106–127.
  • Mahadevan, Kanchana, 2001. “Capabilities and Universality in Feminist Politics,” in Journal of Indian Council of Philosophical Research, 18(4): 75–105.
  • McNay, Lois, 2003. “Having it Both Ways: The Incompatibility of Narrative Identity and Communicative Ethics in Feminist Thought,” in Theory, Culture and Society, 20(6): 1–20.
  • Meehan, Johanna, 2000. “Feminism and Habermas' Discourse Ethics,” in Philosophy and Social Criticism, 26(3): 39–52.
  • Pamerleau, William C., 1996. “Can Habermas' Discourse Ethics Accommodate the Feminist Perspective?” in Rending and Renewing the Social Order, Yeager Hudson (ed.), Lewiston: Mellen Press.
  • Still, Judith, 1994. “What Foucault Fails to Acknowledge...: Feminism and ‘The History of Sexuality,’” History of Human Sciences, 7(2): 150–157.
  • Warnke, Georgia, 2000. “Feminism and Democratic Deliberation,” in Philosophy and Social Criticism, 26(3): 61–74.
  • Wright, Charles, 2004. “Particularity and Perspective Taking: On Feminism and Habermas's Discourse Theory of Morality,” in Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy, 19(4): 49–76.
  • Young, Iris Marion, 1986. “Impartiality and the Civic Public: Some Implications of Feminist Critiques of Moral and Political Theory,” Praxis International, 5: 381–401.

Martin Heidegger

Books

  • Graybeal, Jean, 1990. Language and “The Feminine” in Nietzsche and Heidegger, Bloomington: Indiana University Press.
  • Holland, Nancy, 1998. The Madwoman's Dream: The Concept of the Appropriate in Ethical Thought, University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.
  • Holland, Nancy J. and Patricia Huntington (eds.), 2001. Feminist Interpretations of Martin Heidegger, University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.
  • Huntington, Patricia J., 1998. Ecstatic Subjects, Utopia, and Recognition: Kristeva, Heidegger, Irigaray, Albany: SUNY Press.

Articles

  • Armour, Ellen T., 2001. “‘Through Flame or Ashes’: Traces of Difference in Geist's Return,” in Feminist Interpretations of Martin Heidegger, Nancy J. Holland and Patricia Huntington (eds.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 316–333.
  • Bauer, Nancy, 2001. “Being-with as Being-Against: Heidegger Meets Hegel in the Second Sex,” in Continental Philosophy Review, 34(2): 129–149.
  • Bigwood, Carol, 2001. “Sappho: The She-Greek Heidegger Forgot,” in Feminist Interpretations of Martin Heidegger, Nancy J. Holland and Patricia Huntington (eds.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 165–195.
  • Caputo, John D., 2001. “The Absence of Monica: Heidegger, Derrida, and Augustine's Confessions,” in Feminist Interpretations of Martin Heidegger, Nancy J. Holland and Patricia Huntington (eds.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 149–164.
  • Chanter, Tina, 2001. “The Problematic Normative Assumptions of Heidegger's Ontology,” in Feminist Interpretations of Martin Heidegger, Nancy J. Holland and Patricia Huntington (eds.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 73–108.
  • Dastur, Francoise, 2000. “Phenomenology of the Event: Waiting and Surprise,” in Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy, 15(4): 178–189.
  • Derrida, Jacques, 2001. “Geschlecht: Sexual Difference, Ontological Difference,” in Feminist Interpretations of Martin Heidegger, Nancy J. Holland and Patricia Huntington (eds.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 53–72.
  • Froese, Katrin, 2005. “Woman's Eclipse: The Silenced Feminine in Nietzsche and Heidegger,” in Philosophy and Social Criticism, 31(2): 165–184.
  • Glazebrook, Trish, 2001. “Heidegger and Ecofeminism,” in Feminist Interpretations of Martin Heidegger, Nancy J. Holland and Patricia Huntington (eds.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 221–251.
  • Gosetti, Jennifer Anna, 2001. “Feminine Figures in Heidegger's Theory of Poetic Language,” in Feminist Interpretations of Martin Heidegger, Nancy J. Holland and Patricia Huntington (eds.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 196–218.
  • Holland, Nancy J., 1985. “Heidegger and Derrida Redux: A Close Reading,” in Hermeneutics and Deconstruction, Hugh J. Silverman (ed.), Albany: SUNY Press.
  • Holland, Nancy J., 2001. “Introduction II—Specific Contributions: Feminists Read Heidegger,” in Feminist Interpretations of Martin Heidegger, Nancy J. Holland and Patricia Huntington (eds.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 43–50.
  • Holland, Nancy J., 2001. “‘The Universe Is Made of Stories, Not of Atoms’: Heidegger and the Feminine They-Self,” in Feminist Interpretations of Martin Heidegger, Nancy J. Holland and Patricia Huntington (eds.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 128–145.
  • Huntington, Patricia, 2001. “Introduction I—General Background: History of the Feminist Reception of Heidegger and a Guide to Heidegger's Thought,” in Feminist Interpretations of Martin Heidegger, Nancy J. Holland and Patricia Huntington (eds.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 1–42.
  • Huntington, Patricia, 2001. “Stealing the Fire of Creativity: Heidegger's Challenge to Intellectuals,” in Feminist Interpretations of Martin Heidegger, Nancy J. Holland and Patricia Huntington (eds.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 351–376.
  • Irigaray, Luce, 2001. “From The Forgetting of Air to To Be Two,” Heidi Bostic and Stephen Pluhacek (trans.), in Feminist Interpretations of Martin Heidegger, Nancy J. Holland and Patricia Huntington (eds.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 309–315.
  • Keltner, Stacy, 2003. “The Politics of Traumatic Temporality: Review of Time, Death, and the Feminine: Levinas with Heidegger by Tina Chanter,” in Research in Phenomenology, 33: 306–315.
  • Klawiter, Maren, 1990. “Using Arendt and Heidegger to Consider Feminist Thinking on Women and Reproductive/Infertility Technologies,” Hypatia, 65–89.
  • Kruks, Sonia, 1998. “Existentialism and Phenomenology,” in A Companion to Feminist Philosophy, Alison M. Jaggar (ed.), Cambridge: Blackwell.
  • Leland, Dorothy, 2001. “Conflictual Culture and Authenticity: Deepening Heidegger's Account of the Social,” in Feminist Interpretations of Martin Heidegger, Nancy J. Holland and Patricia Huntington (eds.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 109–127.
  • Mansbach, Abraham, 1998. “Martin Heidegger: Political Enemy/Philosophical Enemy?” in Iyyun: The Jerusalem Philosophical Quarterly, 47(October): 418–426.
  • Nagel, Mechthild, 2001. “Thrownness, Playing-in-the-World, and the Question of Authenticity,” in Feminist Interpretations of Martin Heidegger, Nancy J. Holland and Patricia Huntington (eds.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 289–306.
  • Ortega, Mariana, 2001. “New Mestizas, ‘World’-Travelers, and Dasein: Phenomenology and the Multi-Voiced, Multi-Cultural Self,” in Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy, 16(3): 1–29.
  • Paley, John, 2000. “Heidegger and the Ethics of Care,” in Nursing Philosophy: An International Journal for Healthcare Professionals, 1(1): 64–75.
  • Sofia, Zoe, 2000. “Container Technologies,” in Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy, 15(2): 181–201.
  • Standish, Paul, 1999. “Only Connect: Computer Literacy from Heidegger to Cyberfeminism,” in Educational Theory, 49(4): 417–435.
  • Stenstad, Gail, 2001. “Revolutionary Thinking,” in Feminist Interpretations of Martin Heidegger, Nancy J. Holland and Patricia Huntington (eds.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 334–350.
  • Vasey, Craig R., 1992. “Faceless Women and Serious Others,” in Ethics and Danger, Arleen B. Dallery (ed.), Albany: SUNY Press.
  • Young, Iris Marion, 2001. “House and Home: Feminist Variations on a Theme,” in Feminist Interpretations of Martin Heidegger, Nancy J. Holland and Patricia Huntington (eds.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 252–288.

Edmund Husserl

Books

  • Casebien, Allan, 1992. Film and Phenomenology: Toward a Realist Theory of Cinematic Representation, New York: Cambridge University Press.

Articles

  • Bergoffen, Debra B., 1996. “From Husserl to de Beauvoir: Gendering the Perceived Subject,” Metaphilosophy, 27(1–2): 53–62.
  • Dastur, Francoise, 2000. “Phenomenology of the Event: Waiting and Surprise,” in Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy, 15(4): 178–189.
  • Nissim Sabat, Marilyn, 1991. “The Crisis in Psychoanalysis: Resolution Through Husserlian Phenomenology and Feminism,” Human Studies, 33–66.
  • Oksala, Johanna, 2004. “What is Feminist Phenomenology? Thinking Birth Philosophically,” in Radical Philosophy: A Journal of Socialist and Feminist Philosophy, 126(July-August): 16–22.
  • Willis, Clyde E., 1997. “The Phenomenology of Pornography: A Comment on Catharine MacKinnon's ‘Only Words,’” Law and Philosophy, 16(2): 177–199.

Maurice Merleau-Ponty

Books

  • Allen, Jeffner and Iris Marion Young (eds.), 1989. The Thinking Muse: Feminism and Modern French Philosophy, Bloomington: Indiana University Press.
  • Evans, Fred and Leonard Lawlor (eds.), 2000. Chiasms: Merleau-Ponty's Notion of Flesh, Albany: State University Press.
  • Mazis, Glen, 1993. Emotion and Embodiment: Fragile Ontology, New York: Lang.
  • Olkowski, Dorothea and Gail Weiss (eds.), 2006. Feminist Interpretations of Maurice Merleau-Ponty, University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.
  • Perez Estevez, Antonio, 1989. El individuo y la feminidad, Zulia: University of Zulia, (Portugese).

Articles

  • Andrews, Jorella, 2006. “Vision, Violence, and the Other: A Merleau-Pontean Ethics,” in Feminist Interpretations of Maurice Merleau-Ponty, Dorothea Olkowski and Gail Weiss (eds.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 167–182.
  • Antonio, Diane, 2001. “The Flesh of All That Is: Merleau-Ponty, Irigaray, and Julian's ‘Showings,’” in Sophia: International Journal for Philosophy of Religion, Metaphysical Theology and Ethics, 40(2): 47–65.
  • Bigwood, Carol, 1991. “Renaturalizing the Body (With a Little Help from Merleau-Ponty),” Hypatia, 54–73.
  • Brubaker, David, 2006. “Care for the Flesh: Gilligan, Merleau-Ponty, and Corporeal Styles,” in Feminist Interpretations of Maurice Merleau-Ponty, Dorothea Olkowski and Gail Weiss (eds.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 229–256.
  • Butler, Judith, 2006. “Sexual Difference as a Question of Ethics: Alterities of the Flesh in Irigaray and Merleau-Ponty,” in Feminist Interpretations of Maurice Merleau-Ponty, Dorothea Olkowski and Gail Weiss (eds.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 107–126.
  • Cataldi, Suzanne Laba, 2004. “The Philosopher and Her Shadow: Irigaray's Reading of Merleau-Ponty,” in Philosophy Today, 48(4): 343–354.
  • Coole, Diana, 2001. “Thinking Politically with Merleau-Ponty,” in Radical Philosophy: A Journal of Socialist and Feminist Philosophy, 108(July-August): 17–28.
  • Dastur, Francoise, 2000. “Phenomenology of the Event: Waiting and Surprise,” in Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy, 15(4): 178–189.
  • Diprose, Rosalyn, 1998. “Generosity: Between Love and Desire,” in Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy, 13(1): 1–20.
  • Doyle, Laura, 2006. “Bodies Inside/Out: Violation and Resistance from the Prison Cell to The Bluest Eye,” in Feminist Interpretations of Maurice Merleau-Ponty, Dorothea Olkowski and Gail Weiss (eds.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 183–208.
  • Fielding, Helen, 1996. “Grounding Agency in Depth: The Implications of Merleau-Ponty's Thought for the Politics of Feminism,” Human Studies, 19(2): 175–184.
  • Fielding, Helen A., 2006. “White Logic and the Constancy of Color,” in Feminist Interpretations of Maurice Merleau-Ponty, Dorothea Olkowski and Gail Weiss (eds.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 71–90.
  • Hough, Sheridan, 2003. “Phenomenology, Pomo Baskets and the Work of Mabel McKay,” in Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy, 18(2): 103–113.
  • Kirby, Vicki, 2006. “Culpability and the Double Cross: Irigaray with Merleau-Ponty,” in Feminist Interpretations of Maurice Merleau-Ponty, Dorothea Olkowski and Gail Weiss (eds.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 127–146.
  • Kozel, Susan, 1996. “The Diabolical Strategy of Mimesis: Luce Irigaray's Reading of Maurice Merleau-Ponty,” Hypatia, 11(3): 114–129.
  • Kruks, Sonia, 2006. “Merleau-Ponty and the Problem of Difference in Feminism,” in Feminist Interpretations of Maurice Merleau-Ponty, Dorothea Olkowski and Gail Weiss (eds.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 25–48.
  • Lee, Emily, 2003. “The Meaning of the Visible Differences of the Body,” in Newsletter on Asian and Asian-American Philosophers and Philosophies (American Philosophical Association Newsletters), David H. Kim (ed.), 02(2): 34–37.
  • Lopez Saenz, Maria Carmen, 2003. “Feminismo y racionalidad ampliada,” in Contrastes: Revista Interdisciplinar de Filosofia, 8: 93–107.
  • Lopez Saenz, Maria Carmen, 2004. “Interpretacion feminista de la corporalidad: Merleau-Ponty revistado,” in Estudios Filosoficos, 53(152): 45–58.
  • Murphy, Ann V., 2006. “Language in the Flesh: The Politics of Discourse in Merleau-Ponty, Levinas, and Irigaray,” in Feminist Interpretations of Maurice Merleau-Ponty, Dorothea Olkowski and Gail Weiss (eds.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 257–271.
  • Oksala, Johanna, 2006. “Female Freedom: Can the Lived Body Be Emancipated?” in Feminist Interpretations of Maurice Merleau-Ponty, Dorothea Olkowski and Gail Weiss (eds.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 209–228.
  • Olkowski, Dorothea, 2006. “Introduction: The Situated Subject,” in Feminist Interpretations of Maurice Merleau-Ponty, Dorothea Olkowski and Gail Weiss (eds.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 1–23.
  • Olkowski, Dorothea, 2006. “Only Nature Is Mother to the Child,” in Feminist Interpretations of Maurice Merleau-Ponty, Dorothea Olkowski and Gail Weiss (eds.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 49–70.
  • O'Loughlin, Marjorie, 1995. “Intelligent Bodies and Ecological Subjectivists: Merleau-Ponty's Corrective to Postmodernism's ‘Subjects’ of Education,” in Philosophy of Education, Alven Neiman (ed.), Urbana: Philosophy of Education and Society.
  • O'Loughlin, Marjorie, 1998. “Overcoming the Problems of ‘Difference’ in Education: Empathy as ‘Intercorporeality,’” in Studies in Philosophy of Education, 17(4): 283–293.
  • Popen, Shari, 1995. “Merleau-Ponty Confronts Postmodernism: A Reply to O'Loughlin,” in Philosophy of Education, Alven Neiman (ed.), Urbana: Philosophy of Education and Society.
  • Preston, Beth, 1996. “Merleau-Ponty and the Feminine Embodied Eixstence,” Man and World, 29(2): 167–186.
  • Reineke, Martha J., 1987. “Lacan, Merleau-Ponty, and Irigaray: Reflections on a Specular Drama,” Auslegung, 14: 67–85.
  • Sjoholm, Cecilia, 2000. “Crossing Lovers: Luce Irigaray's Elemental Passions,” in Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy, 15(3): 92–112.
  • Stawarska, Beata, 2006. “From the Body Proper to Flesh: Merleau-Ponty on Intersubjectivity,” in Feminist Interpretations of Maurice Merleau-Ponty, Dorothea Olkowski and Gail Weiss (eds.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 91–106.
  • Stoller, Silvia, 2005. “Asymmetrical Genders: Phenomenological Reflections on Sexual Difference,” Camilla R. Nielsen (trans.), in Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy, 20(2): 7–26.
  • Stoller, Silvia, 2000. “Reflections on Feminist Merleau-Ponty Skepticism,” in Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy, 15(1): 175–182.
  • Stoller, Silvia, 2001. “The Sexual Difference from the Perspective of Merleau-Ponty,” Alfred Leskovec (trans.) in Phainomena: Journal of the Phenomenological Society of Mlubljana, 10(37–38): 199–210.
  • Sullivan, Shannon, 1997. “Domination and Dialogue in Merleau-Ponty's ‘Phenomenology of Perception,’” Hypatia, 12(1): 1–19.
  • Sullivan, Shannon, 2000. “Feminism and Phenomenology: A Reply to Silvia Stoller,” in Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy, 15(1): 183–188.
  • Vasseleu, Cathryn, 2001. “Textures of Light: Vision and Touch in Irigaray, Levinas, and Merleau-Ponty,” in Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy, 16(1).
  • Weiss, Gail, 2002. “The Anonymous Intentions of Transactional Bodies,” in Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy, 17(4): 187–200.
  • Welsh, Talia, 2001. “The Logic of the Observed: Merleau-Ponty's Conception of Women As Outlined in His 1951–1952 Sorbonne Lecture The Question of Method in Child Psychology,” in Symposium: Journal of the Canadian Society for Hermeneutics and Postmodern Thought, 5(1): 83–94.
  • Young, Iris Marion, 1980. “Throwing Like a Girl: A Phenomenology of Feminine Body Comportments, Motility, and Spatiality,” Human Studies, 3: 137–156.

Jean-Paul Sartre

Books

  • Allen, Jeffner and Iris Marion Young (eds.), 1989. The Thinking Muse: Feminism and Modern French Philosophy, Bloomington: Indiana University Press.
  • Barrett, W., 1962. Irrational Man, New York: Doubleday Anchor.
  • Murphy, Julien S. (ed.), 1999. Feminist Interpretations of Jean-Paul Sartre, University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.

Articles

  • Barnes, Hazel E., 1990. “Sartre and Sexism,” Philosophy and Literature, 340–347.
  • Barnes, Hazel, 1999. “Sartre and Feminism: Aside from The Second Sex and All That,” in Feminist Interpretations of Jean-Paul Sartre, Julien S. Murphy (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 22–44.
  • Bell, Linda Ann, 1999. “Different Oppressions: A Feminist Exploration of Sartre's Anti-Semite and Jew,” in Feminist Interpretations of Jean-Paul Sartre, Julien S. Murphy (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 123–148.
  • Bergoffen, Debra B., 1992. “The Look as Bad Faith,” Philosophy Today, 36(3): 221–227.
  • Bergoffen, Debra B., 2002. “Simone de Beauvoir and Jean-Paul Sartre: Woman, Man, and the Desire to Be God,” in Constellations: An International Journal of Critical and Democratic Theory, 9(3): 409–418.
  • Charme, Stuart Z., 2000. “Revisiting Sartre on the Question of Religion,” in Continental Philosophy Review, 33(1): 1–26.
  • Charme, Stuart Z., 1999. “Sartre and the Links between Patriarchal Atheism and Feminist Theology,” in Feminist Interpretations of Jean-Paul Sartre, Julien S. Murphy (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 300–324.
  • Collins, Margery and Christine Pierce, 1976. “Holes and Slime: Sexism in Sartre's Psychoanalysis,” in Women and Philosophy: Toward a Theory of Liberation, Carol Gould and Marx X. Wartofsky (eds.), New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons.
  • Comesana, Gloria M., 1986. “Analisis de las figuras femeninas en el teatro de Sartre,” Revista de Filosofia (Venezuela), 9: 103–133 (Spanish).
  • Comesana Santalices, Gloria, 1996. “’Behind Closed Doors’: Analysis of the Feminine Figures in Sartrean Theater,” Revista de Filosofia (Venezuela), 24(2): 53–79 (Spanish).
  • Comesana Santalices, Gloria M., 1998. “Jean Paul Sartre: Filosofo de la Disidencia,” in Utopia y Praxis Latinoamericana: Revista Internacional de Filosofia Iberoamericana y Teoria Social, 3(5): 119–128.
  • De Lacoste, Guillermine, 1999. “The Beauvoir and Levy Interviews: Toward a Feminine Economy,” in Feminist Interpretations of Jean-Paul Sartre, Julien S. Murphy (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 272–299.
  • Diers, Peter, 1999. “Friendship and Feminist Praxis: Insights from Sartre's Critique of Dialectical Reason,” in Feminist Interpretations of Jean-Paul Sartre, Julien S. Murphy (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 253–271.
  • Duran, Jane, 2004. “Sartre, Gender Theory and the Possibility of Transcendence,” in Philosophy and Social Criticism, 30(3): 265–281.
  • Fullbrook, Kate and Edward Fullbrook, 1995. “Sartre's Secret Key,” in Feminist Interpretations of Simone de Beauvoir, Margaret A. Simons (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.
  • Fullbrook, Edward, 1999. “She Came to Stay and Being and Nothingness,” in Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy, 14(4): 50–69.
  • Fullbrook, Edward and Kate Fullbrook, 1999. “The Absence of Beauvoir,” in Feminist Interpretations of Jean-Paul Sartre, Julien S. Murphy (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 45–63.
  • Gothlin, Eva, 1999. “Simone de Beauvoir's Notions of Appeal, Desire, and Ambiguity and Their Relationship to Jean-Paul Sartre's Notions of Appeal and Desire,” in Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy, 14(4): 83–95.
  • Green, Karen, 1999. “Sartre and de Beauvoir on Freedom and Oppression,” in Feminist Interpretations of Jean-Paul Sartre, Julien S. Murphy (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 175–199.
  • Grell, Isabelle, 2004. “The Invention of Two Women in Les Chemins de la liberte,” in Sartre Studies International: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Existentialism and Contemporary Culture, 10(2): 161–181.
  • Hoagland, Sarah Lucia, 1999. “Existential Freedom and Political Change,” in Feminist Interpretations of Jean-Paul Sartre, Julien S. Murphy (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 149–174.
  • Keat, R., 1983. “Masculinity in Philosophy,” Radical Philosophy, 34(Summer): 15–20.
  • Kruks, Sonia, 1998. “Existentialism and Phenomenology,” in A Companion to Feminist Philosophy, Alison M. Jaggar (ed.), Cambridge: Blackwell.
  • Kruks, Sonia, 1995. “Simone de Beauvoir: Teaching Sartre About Freedom,” in Feminist Interpretations of Simone de Beauvoir, Margaret A. Simons (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.
  • Kruks, Sonia, 1999. “Identity Politics and Dialectical Reason: Beyond an Epistemology of Provenance,” in Feminist Interpretations of Jean-Paul Sartre, Julien S. Murphy (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 229–252.
  • Kruks, Sonia, 2001. “Retrieving Experience: Subjectivity and Recognition in Feminist Politics,” in Sartre Studies International: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Existentialism and Contemporary Culture, 8(2).
  • Lancaster, Natascha H., 2000. “Women and Minorities vs. Sartre: Win, Win…Win!” in Sartre Studies International: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Existentialism and Contemporary Culture, 6(2): 12–25.
  • Martin, Thomas, 1999. “Sartre, Sadism, and Female Beauty Ideals,” in Feminist Interpretations of Jean-Paul Sartre, Julien S. Murphy (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 90–104.
  • Morris, Phyllis Sutton, 1999. “Sartre on Objectification: A Feminist Perspective,” in Feminist Interpretations of Jean-Paul Sartre, Julien S. Murphy (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 64–89.
  • Mui, Constance, 1990. “Sartre's Sexism Reconsidered,” Auslegung, 16(1): 31–41.
  • Mui, Constance L., 1999. “Sartre and Marcel on Embodiment: Reevaluating Traditional and Gynocentric Feminisms,” in Feminist Interpretations of Jean-Paul Sartre, Julien S. Murphy (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 105–122.
  • Murphy, Julien S., 1987. “The Look in Sartre and Rich,” Hypatia, 2: 113–124.
  • Oliver, Kelly, 2001. “The Look of Love,” in Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy, 16(3): 56–78.
  • Skakoon, Walter, 2000. “A Commentary: Natascha H. Lancaster's Minorities versus Sartre's Saint Genet and Loren Ringer's L'homosexuel imaginaire: Sartre's Interpretive Grid in Saint Genet,” in Sartre Studies International: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Existentialism and Contemporary Culture, 6(2): 36–45.
  • Young, Iris Marion, 1999. “Gender as Seriality: Thinking About Women as a Social Collective,” in Feminist Interpretations of Jean-Paul Sartre, Julien S. Murphy (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 200–228.

Other Twentieth Century French Philosophy

Books

  • Allen, Jeffner and Iris Marion Young (eds.), 1989. The Thinking Muse: Feminism and Modern French Philosophy, Bloomington: Indiana University Press.
  • French, Patrick and Roland Francois Lack (eds.), 1998. The Tel Quel Reader, New York: Routledge.
  • Hekman, Susan (ed.), 1996. Feminist Interpretations of Michel Foucault, University Park, PA: The Pennsylvania State University Press.
  • Holland, Nancy J. (ed.), 1997 Feminist Interpretations of Jacques Derrida, University Park, PA: The Pennsylvania University State Press.
  • Le Doeuff, Michele, 1990. The Philosophical Imaginary, Colin Gordon (trans.), Stanford: Stanford University Press.
  • Mathy, Jean Philippe, 1993. Extreme--Occident: French Intellectuals and America, Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
  • Matthews, Eric, 1996. Twentieth-Century French Philosophy, New York: Oxford University Press.
  • Mortley, Raoul, 1991. French Philosophies in Conversation: Levinas, Schneider, Serres, Irigaray, Le Doeuff, Derrida, New York: Routledge.
  • Oliver, Kelly (ed.), 2000. French Feminism Reader, Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield.

Articles

  • Ettinger, Bracha L., 2004. “Weaving a Woman Artist with-in the Matrixial Encounter-Event,” in Theory, Culture, and Society, 21(1): 69–93.
  • Oliver, Kelly, 2001. “The Look of Love,” in Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy, 16(3): 56–78.

Return to Feminist History of Philosophy

[Note that this bibliography has been compiled and is maintained by Abigail Gosselin.]

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Charlotte Witt <cewitt@cisunix.unh.edu>
Lisa Shapiro <lshapiro@sfu.ca>

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